Obituary and Will of Samuel Eggleston

I learned interesting things from the Obituary and Will of Samuel Eggleston.

Samuel Eggleston died May 26, 1884 in Ogden, Utah. A Notice of his death was printed in the Monday edition of the Ogden Daily Herald.

Newspaper Account of Samuel Eggleston’s Funeral:

Ogden Daily Herald
Obituary Saturday 31, 1884
Samuel Eggleston

A large concourse of relatives and friends assembled in the Second Ward meetinghouse, on the afternoon of May 27th, 1884, to participate in the funeral services over the remains of Elder Samuel Eggleston who departed this life, on the morning of the 26th inst. The services were Conducted by Bishop Robert McQuarrie. The services were opened by the choir singing: “We have met, dear friends and brethren, Our respects to pay to one Who has left this world of sorrow And to glory now has gone.”

Prayer was offered by President C. F. Middleton. The choir sang: “Thou doest not weep to weep alone,” etc. The Bishop then stated that previous to the death of the deceased he had requested that Elders Lorin Farr, and L.J. Herrick, and Apostle F. D. Richards act as speakers at his funeral. Those brethren are all present and would address the meeting.

Elder Lorin Farr was the first speaker. He said that we are reminded by the circumstances that have called us together that this earth and this state of existence are not our permanent condition and abiding-place, but that all must undergo a change. We have been called upon today, to pay our last respects to the mortal remains of our brother, but not our last respects to him, for he still lives and we shall meet him again in another sphere and better condition than we now experience. He then spoke of the object of man coming to the earth, namely to work out a more exceeding weight of glory and exaltation than we otherwise could and said this is the most important age of the world in which the Lord has ever spoken to man on the earth, as it is the dispensation of the fullness of times, when God will gather all things into one and the restitution of all things spoken by the Prophets. The speaker next contrasted the religion of the world with that of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and showed that the latter was the only true order of the Kingdom of God which He has established upon the earth in the last days. This is the Gospel which our brother, whose remains lie before us, had embraced and to which he remained faithful while he lived in this state of existence, he spoke of the great events that are transpiring and of the opposition of mankind to this great work, but it will triumph and God will give the victory to all who maintain their integrity. Our brother was such an one, he held the high Melchisedek Priesthood and magnified it to the end of his life. He has kept his covenants that entitle him to go into the presence of God and to associate with Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Joseph, Hyrum, and others in the spirit world, and can also labor there and preach to the spirits in prison, for he carries with him the keys and the watchword authorizing him to do these things and entitle him to the blessings of associating with his former wife and friends who have gone before him. His mind, in this life, was always engaged in, and contemplating this great work of God. For these reasons his family and friends have little cause to mourn his departure from this life. He will, ere long, return again and if faithful will have the privilege to live and enjoy society here again.

Elder Lester J. Herrick was the next speaker. His failing health prevented him from speaking so loud, or as much as he otherwise could desire. He could endorse all that had been said by Elder Farr upon this subject. He, like many men, believed that if, when we depart, this is the end of man he would be in a miserable condition. But this is not true, for he looked forward to the time when he should again meet and hold converse with Father Eggleston in the future, as he has done in the past; for death is the passport to eternal life. Hence, when he can no longer enjoy life and be no longer useful to his fellow-man here, he does not desire to linger in pain and suffering, but he desires to have his lamp trimmed and burning and ready, when the time of his departure comes for he expects to meet his father, mother, and other friends, and enjoy a good and happy time with them. He had known the deceased from the time he first came here, and spoke of him in the highest term of commendation, both as a man, a citizen, and a servant of God. His place was made with him, he was reconciled to Him, and he died with a feeling of peace towards God and his brethren and sisters, for he has fought the good fight, kept the faith, and has overcome the world, death and the grave, and has entered into eternal life. Elder Herrick reminded the people that it was necessary to observe the things of the present life, to prepare for full enjoyment of the life to come.

Apostle F. D. Richards next addressed the meeting. He had visited the deceased, a short time before his death, and found that, although his voice was weak, his spirit was strong, bright and lively and he could converse on the things of God as freshly and intelligently as he ever did, and thus his faculties remained bright to the last. He then said to the friends of the deceased that there lies before us a rich man; for he is rich in the things of the Kingdom of God. He felt that it was possible that Brother Eggleston could have been kept alive a short time longer, yet his system was worn out and it seemed wisdom in the Lord to take him. He said that the deceased had fought the good fight and kept the faith, and had entered into life. He exhorted the widow and the children to observe the counsels of their husband and father, for this was his special desire before he died. He has gone to prepare a place for you, and if you are faithful you will inherit it with him. The speaker then read a part of the 20th Chapter of Luke, in relation to the question of the Sadducees concerning the woman who had seven husbands in this life but died without issue. “Whose wife shall she be?” The speaker then explained the nature of the resurrection in which it is said there is “neither marrying nor giving in marriage” etc. and showed that this referred to those who heard the Gospel, but refused to obey it here in the flesh, who persecuted the servants and Saints of God and put them to death, that it applied to those who attain to the Telestial glory. They are cut off from marrying or giving in marriage in their resurrection. But there is nothing said in the revelations of God that will debar the righteous from the enjoyment of all these blessings either here, in this life or in the resurrection of the just. Brother Eggleston is one of those who are entitled to the highest glories to which the righteous attain, for he has honored every law of God that has come to his knowledge, as far as he has been able to do so; and if his widow, sons, daughters and other posterity are faithful they will enjoy these blessings and honors with him at the coming of the Son of God and will still go forward, increasing in the knowledge of the things of the Celestial Kingdom of God. He referred to the abundance of heavenly blessings bestowed upon the Church in our day, the existence of two Temples in which the people may labor for their eternal interests of the living and of their dead, with another nearing completion. How lavishly the Lord bestows his favor upon his people in multiplying his great blessings upon us, in giving us as many of the ordinances which tend to our exaltation if rightly appreciated and to our increase of knowledge and understanding in all His statutes, ordinances and judgements. He closed by exhorting the Saints to be faithful in all things, that they may be partakers of these great blessings.

Bishop Robert McQuarrie said we had just parted with a good, kind and faithful man. He was blessed of the Lord, was spiritually-minded, and blessed with the visions of the Lord to a great degree. He was a good counselor, while united with the speaker and the other counselor. There were never any jars or discords between them, but they always labored together in harmony and in peace for the building up of the Kingdom of God in the Ward over which they had the watchcare.

The choir sang a funeral hymn: “Brother, thou art gone before us.”The services closed by benediction by President L. W. Shurtliff, after which the remains were conveyed to the cemetery and consigned to rest.

Obituary

The deceased, Samuel Eggleston, was the son of Samuel and Elizabeth H. Eggleston. He was born at Marcellus, New York, March 30th, 1801. [1804] In 1817, he moved with his father, and family to Springwater, in the same State. When 19 years old, he left home and went to Sempronius and took up his abode with Thomas Marsh, his brother-in-law, with whom he remained four years. On the 23rd of August, 1827, he was married to Miss Lurania P. Burgess by Mr. Gordon, a Baptist minister, to whose church he then belonged. He had previously belonged to the Close Communion Baptists. He subsequently joined the Freewill Baptists. He became dissatisfied with them and held himself aloof from Christian institutions for a long time. On the 6th of June,1841 he was baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints by Elder Pelatiah Brown. On the 18th day of July following, he was ordained a Teacher by Dr. Willard Richards. In July, 1842, he removed with his family to Nauvoo. In October, 1844, he was ordained a member of the 9th Quorum of Seventies. Brother Eggleston and family remained at Nauvoo till the year 1846, when he shared in the exodus from that city. He went to Winter Quarters and stayed there till 1848 when he moved back to the east side of the Missouri River. In the spring of 1851, he went to Council Bluffs, Iowa. While in the latter State he was Justice of the Peace for ten years, Notary Public for nine years, and Deputy Postmaster for five years. In 1862, he came to Utah, settling in Ogden. In 1863, he was ordained a high Priest by F. A. Hammond and others. On May 30, 1877, he was set apart as First Counselor to Robert McQuarrie, Bishop of the Second Ward of this city, which position he held until he died. On the 24th of October, 1882, he was ordained a Patriarch under the hands of President George Q. Cannon and others. The deceased Patriarch leaves four children, living (four having died); and twenty-seven grandchildren, (eleven more being dead) to build up his house and perpetuate his name in Israel. Peace to his ashes.

Will of Samuel Eggleston

Samuel left a will written April 27, 1884, just a month before his death (Transcribed below):

In the Name of God Amen
I Samuel Eggleston of Ogden City in the County of Weber and the Territory of Utah, of the age of eighty six years and being of sound and disposing mind and memory, and not acting under duress, [ ] fraudulent misrepresentation or undue influence of any person whatever, do make publish and declare this my Last Will and Testament, in manner following
That is to Say
First, I give and bequeath to my son, Edwin Eggleston who resides at Council Bluffs, in the State of Iowa the sum of ten (10) Dollars to be paid from the sale of any estate.
Secondly, I give and bequeath to my daughter Mary Elizabeth Farr, wife of Enoch Farr, the feather bed now used by me, and which was used by her mother during her lifetime.
Thirdly, I give and bequeath to my wife Katherine Eggleston, absolutely, all the personal property of every kind and nature, owned by me at the time of my death.
Fourthly, wishing to provide for the support and maintenance of my beloved wife Katherine Eggleston as long as she may live, and in a suitable a manner as the condition of my estate will provide. I give and devise to my said wife for her separate sole use and benefit so long as she may live, the use occupancy and control of all of my real estate of every name and nature whatsoever, owned by me at the time of my death and all rents, issues and profits, which may arise therefrom during her lifetime.
Fiftly, At the death of my said wife, Katherine Eggleston, I give and devise to my sons Reuben B. Eggleston, Orson H. Eggleston and to my daughter Mary Elizabeth Farr, wife of Enoch Farr, all the real estate of every name and nature whatsoever, owned by me at the time of my death, to be divided equally between them, share and share alike.
Lastly, I hereby enumerate and appoint my wife, Katherine Eggleston, of Ogden City aforesaid, the Executrix of this my Last Will and Testament, and hereby revoke all former Wills by me made.
In Witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal, this Twenty Seventh day of April in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and eighty four.
Samuel Eggleston

The foregoing instrument, consisting of one page, besides this, was at the date hereof by the said Samuel Eggleston signed and sealed and published as, and declared to be his last Will and Testament, in presence of us, who at his request, and in his presence, in the presence of each other, have subscribed and signed as witnesses thereto.
Robert McQuarrie
Residing at Ogden City, in Weber County, Utah Territory
John Harris
Residing at Ogden City in Weber County, Utah Territory

The Official Probate Packet is rather large, containing several documents. It lists heirs as Samuel’s widow, Katherine Eggleston, children Edwin Eggleston, age 50 of Council Bluffs, Iowa, Mary Farr, age 35, wife of Enoch Farr, of Ogden, Utah, Reuben B. Eggleston, age 52 of Ogden, Utah and Orson H. Eggleston, age 43 of Eden, Utah. Katherine was 49 years old and the petitioner.

Samuel’s Estate

The Probate Record describes Samuel’s property as:

A part of Lot 3 in Block 20 in Plat A of Ogden city Survey in said Weber County, bounded as bollows: Beginning at a point 40 feet West of the South East corner of said Lot, and running thence West 52 feet, thence North 20 rods, thence East 52 feet, thence South 20 rods to the place of beginning – the homestead of the deceased, with house and improvements hereon, valued at about $1000.00. Sundry household goods and effects valued at about $50.00.

The property was later appraised and valued at $800, plus the $50 personal property. A Notice to Creditors which was published after Samuel’s death placed this property on the north side of Sixth Street (now 26th St.), between Franklin and Wall Streets. Franklin is now Lincoln Ave., so his home would have been on the north side of 26th St. between Lincoln and Wall Ave.

Catherine was executrix of Samuel’s will and the provisions in the will were for her to remain in their home as long as she lived. Upon her death in 1888, Reuben petitioned the Court to administer the estate. The property was appraised again and  valued at $2000 on June 27, 1889.

The household goods which were given to Catherine after Samuel’s death became part of her estate. Edwin received his $10 and Mary Farr the feather bed. The real estate was divided equally between Reuben, Orson and Mary.

Samuel Eggleston Utah Pioneer

Samuel Eggleston

Early Life of Samuel Eggleston in New York

Samuel Eggleston, son of Samuel & Elizabeth Hill Eggleston was born March 30, 1804 in Marcellus, Onondaga County, New York. He wrote a brief autobiography which states:

“I lived in the town of Marcellus until I was 13 years old, then my father, with his family, then moved into the town of Springwater, Livingston County, state of New York. My brothers and sisters numbered ten in family. I lived with my father until I was 19 years old, then I went to live with my brother-in-law to learn the tanner’s trade. I lived with them until I was 23 years old . . .”

Samuel’s father came to Marcellus in the early 1800’s with his parents and other family members. He bought a piece of land bordering Skaneateles Lake. He sold this land in 1817 which was the time that the family moved to Springwater.

Samuel’s mother, Elizabeth Hill Eggleston, also known as Betsy, died in 1823 in Springwater. Some of the children were still quite young at the time of her death. Samuel was about 19 years old. It was around this time that Samuel went back to the area where he had grown up. His older sister Lucy had married Thomas Marsh and they were living in Sempronius, across the lake from Marcellus. Samuel’s obituary indicates that it was Thomas Marsh with whom he lived for 4 years, from age 19 to 23. He learned the tanner’s trade from Thomas Marsh.

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Constant Ann Stephens Eggleston McBride

Constant Ann Stephens Eggleston McBride

Constant Ann Stephens Eggleston

Early Life

Constant Ann Stephens was born February 17, 1849 at Council Bluffs, Potawattamie Co. Iowa, the daughter of John Stephens and Elizabeth Briggs. She was the ninth of twelve children.

Constant’s father had a farm at Council Bluffs. She crossed the plains at the age of two, arriving in Utah October 14, 1851. Her father was a Captain of ten in the Orson Pratt Company. The family resided in Weber County. Her father built the first reservoir in Weber County in 1856.

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The Life and Untimely Death of Harvey Burgess Eggleston

Little is known of the details of the life of Harvey Burgess Eggleston. He was just becoming an adult when his life was cut short. We can only imagine what his life would have been like if he had lived, and wonder about the circumstances of his death.

Birth of Harvey Burgess Eggleston

Harvey Burgess Eggleston, the 5th child of Samuel and Lurania Powers Burgess Eggleston, was born February 8, 1836, In Sempronius, Cayuga County, New York. He was named for his grandfather Harvey Burgess. His parents lost their first 2 sons as infants, so when Harvey was born he had two older brothers.

 

Family Bible birth of Harvey Burgess Eggleston

The birth date of Harvey Burgess Eggleston was recorded in the Eggleston Family Bible – bottom on the left

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2001 An Eggleston Genealogy Odyssey – Part 1 to Iowa

I learned a great deal about our family history during a 2001 road trip tracing our family’s migration route in reverse – An Eggleston Genealogy Odyssey.

The Eggleston Genealogy Odyssey Begins

Eggleston Genealogy transportation

This is the only photo I took of the motorhome on the trip. Skaneateles Lake is in the background

In August 2001, I invited myself on a journey with my Dad. Mom passed away in November 2000. She and Dad had traveled around much of the country in their motorhome. That summer, Dad wanted to drive to New Hampshire to visit my sister. It was a trip he had made several times with Mom, but I was concerned about him traveling that far by himself. (He later made many solitary trips – just not that far) I also was up for a visit with my sister. We learned that my other sister would be staying with them for a while in between moves, so it was a 2 for 1. After doing a good decade of genealogy research, I saw an opportunity to see some of the places our ancestors had lived. I eagerly offered to accompany Dad so he wouldn’t be lonely on this trip. Thus began a journey to a family reunion which traced our family’s migration route across the country – in reverse. A journey back to our beginnings, almost.

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The Very Brief Life of Samuel Eggleston IV

January 16th marks the anniversary of the birth of Samuel Eggleston, son of Samuel and Lurania Powers Burgess Eggleston. His birth, life and death occurred during a very dark time and place in the lives of his family and the larger community of Latter-day Saints. Early in 1846, the Saints were forced to leave their homes in Nauvoo, Illinois. The Eggleston family were not among the first to leave. They stayed until sometime in the spring of 1846 according to Samuel’s account. They may have stayed longer than others for financial reasons, or to help with the completion of the Temple which was dedicated May 1, 1846.

The Egglestons traveled to Winter Quarters in Nebraska, where the Saints had gathered to prepare to go further west. Small cabins were built where they spent a miserable winter. There was inadequate food for the many refugees camped there. There was also much disease which was easily spread. Many people died during that year, especially the very young and very old.

Birth of baby Samuel to Lurania and Samuel Eggleston

Lurania Powers Burgess Eggleston

Lurania Powers Burgess Eggleston

Lurania Powers Burgess Eggleston, who was 38 years old at that time, gave birth to a son on the bleak winter day of January 16th. Patty Sessions was a prominent midwife during that time. Fortunately for us, she kept records in her diary and an account book. Her notation under the date of 16 January was “Put sister Eggleston to bed with a son Samuel E.” “Putting to bed” was her way of noting the confinement and delivery of a baby. Patty’s account book showed that Samuel Eggleston paid $2.00 for her services January 16.

The birth of this child must have brought great joy to the family at a time of great suffering. He was given the name of his father – Samuel. He may have also been named after Samuel H. Smith who along with Orson Hyde had introduced the family to the Restored Gospel. (They had named their last born son Orson Hyde Eggleston)

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News and Insights from Old Family Letters

Old family letters give some great information and wonderful insights into the lives and relationships of our ancestors.

Some family letters written to Samuel Eggleston were included on typed sheets I found with records of Theron Eggleston at the home of his daughter Ruth. With these letters were others with genealogical information that Orson Hyde Eggleston gathered while on his mission and genealogical correspondence. These had all apparently been transcribed by Theron or his wife. I don’t know what happened to the original letters.

I found this correspondence to be quite interesting. The family letters give some insights into personalities and family relationships as well as provided some genealogical clues which were helpful in my research.

The Family Letters – First from Eliza Barron

This earliest letter, dated 1862, was to Samuel Eggleston from his sister Eliza Barron. Samuel had recently migrated from Iowa to Utah. Eliza passed away in 1869. Eliza mentioned their brother Ansel, who was somewhat of a mystery – to us, and possibly to them. This letter provided clues to help me find him in records in Michigan, where he died in 1871. We also get a glimpse of personalities from the things Eliza said about her brother as well as the colorful way she expressed herself. I would like to have known Aunt Eliza.

Eliza also mentioned a letter from Rev. A. Eggleston, who would be the Ambrose Eggleston mentioned in later genealogical correspondence. This letter to Eliza may have begun that correspondence.

1862 family letters from Eliza Barron to Samuel Eggleston

 

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Our Mormon Pioneer Ancestors

July 24th is a significant day for members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and for the State of Utah. We commemorate the settling of Utah by the Mormon Pioneers, the first of whom arrived in July 1847. The Pioneer Era is generally considered to span from 1847 to 1869 when the Trans- continental Railroad was completed.

Eggleston Pioneers

Our family has a large and rich pioneer heritage. Our first Eggleston ancestors to come to Utah were Orson Hyde Eggleston and his brother Reuben, along with his wife Emeline and young son.

Orson H. Eggleston

Orson H. Eggleston

ReubenB

Reuben Eggleston

 

 

 

 

 

1861

In the summer of 1861, Orson came to Utah with his brother Reuben and his family in the David H. Cannon Company.  Bartlett Tripp, who was Company Clerk for the David H. Cannon Pioneer Company in 1861, included a list of company members in his Camp Journal. Listed were Reub. B. Eggleston, wife and 1 child, Orson Eggleston, 4 oxen, 1 cow, 1 wagon. Continue reading

Doc’s Memories of Laura

Laura went to school at Eden Elementary, Huntsville Junior High and Weber High School. She had one real problem getting to school. She would get car sick. She tried to get the driver to save a seat right up front for her. If he did not then he would have to clean the bus. This was a real problem because she rode the bus down the canyon to Weber High. She was an average student and got along well with her fellow students.

F051

Laura in 1937

Laura 1937 right

Laura on the right with school friends in 1937

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After graduating from High School she was somewhat lost. Mother had died and she did not get along well with Dad, he had trouble communicating with us. When Mel got out of school, she did a lot with him. She got an apartment on the corner of Lincoln and 25th Street. She met and married Stevens and had a son Guy. He abused her so she divorced him.Then she married Lee Saunders. Continue reading