2001 An Eggleston Genealogy Odyssey Part 5 – Marcellus, New York

Our 2001 Eggleston Genealogy Odyssey continued in Marcellus, New York, which turned out to be a goldmine. Not only were we able to walk around the area where Samuel and Rebecca Eggleston migrated in the early 1800’s, but we found precious Church records mentioning many family members.

After leaving the Kellogsville Cemetery for the second time the morning of Friday August 10th, we drove back up and around Skaneateles Lake. On the east side of the lake are very large homes along the lakefront. Then we turned and went up the hill further east to find farms.

The Rosehill/Thornhill/Marcellus Baptist Church

Rosehill Baptist Church

We drove past some cornfields and found the Thornhill Church (It is now called Rosehill Baptist Church-that is what is on the sign) on the corner. It is an old white frame building with a tower and steeple in front. I learned from histories that it was built in 1849, with the tower added later. The windows are large and rectangular with a row of different colored stained glass panes around the large rectangles.

Inside the church smelled old and musty. The door was open but we found no one inside. The chapel is obviously the original part of the building but there are additions. These included a kitchen, an area where they had copy machines and a very recent addition of a large recreation hall. (The Pastor seemed quite proud of this new addition.)

I had contacted Pastor Olcott before our trip. He told us that there were early records of the church and we were welcome to visit and look at them. We saw a phone in the front entry of the church and I was going to call the Pastor, but it rang and was picked up at their home next door.

The Thornhill Cemetery

We went outside to the adjacent Thorn Hill Cemetery and easily found Benjamin and Elizabeth Eggleston’s graves. Next to them is a large monument for Sarah Gardner, Theodore’s wife and on the other side is Ruth, wife of Thomas Bryant.

I found an interesting Cornell marker which was hard to read. There was a verse at the bottom. I am still curious about this one.

The Church Records

While we were looking in the Cemetery, Pastor Olcott came walking over from the house. He took us inside and upstairs to an office. Then he dug through a file cabinet and pulled out the records. There were two old long, narrow books and some small, newer ones. He left us there and went out to mow the lawn. I was amazed that we were allowed to handle these books, one that was almost 200 years old, without cotton gloves or any supervision.

I looked through the oldest book and found many familiar names. Dad looked through the next book (abt 1825-1850) and made some notes.

I should note that this trip was early in the digital age. I was taking pictures with a camera that used film. Digital cameras were not very good then and we did not have one. Of course, we did not have cell phones with cameras – we didn’t even have a cell phone. I did have a scanner at home, but it would have been awkward to haul it around. Portable scanners were available but expensive, and I had not invested in one. So we were rather low tech with our attempts to capture the information in these records.

We marked some pages and went downstairs and made copies on their copy machine. Unfortunately they only had regular size paper and these pages were longer. And yes, we were flipping pages in a 200 year old book and throwing them up on the copy machine.

It was getting lunchtime and I suggested Dad go out and make sandwiches, but he stayed to help me. We ate lunch there in the parking lot. I could have stayed all day going through those records and would like to have copied all of them. We did copy membership lists and pages that had information about Eggleston family members.

Marcellus

We drove around the area some and I tried to determine where the Egglestons had lived. I had an old map that I had used when doing research into land records. It showed the various lot numbers, so it gave us some idea of where family members would have lived.

Old map of Marcellus

Samuel Jr. had land on Lot 59 which bordered the lake so would have had some pretty lake front. There is not really any beach, but the woods probably would have gone right out to the water. The farms were probably up on the hill and their home would have been along the road, likely the same road we drove on.

Skaneateles Lake

The land probably was rather wooded originally, then they cleared farms. There are still wooded areas and many farms. Samuel Sr., Nathan, Benjamin, Joseph and the Tanners would have had more level land further east and away from the lake.

 

Photo showing the Motorhome on the road headed toward Skaneateles Lake

We left Marcellus with our copies of the precious Church records. I continued to be concerned about those records. They could so easily be damaged or destroyed – it was amazing to me that they hadn’t been already. After I returned home, I wrote to Pastor Olcott, thanking him for showing us the records and suggested some ways he could have the records digitally preserved. I haven’t seen them show up online. I hope something has been done to preserve them.

2001 An Eggleston Genealogy Odyssey Part 4 – Sempronius, New York

A continuation of the 2001 Eggleston Genealogy trip with my Father to places where our ancestors had lived. Part 4 is our visit to Sempronius, New York.

Cayuga County

After our fruitless Cemetery searching in Springwater, New York, we visited some L.D.S. Church History sites in Western New York. Then we drove toward Cayuga County. As we came into the village of Skaneateles we saw the Lake View Cemetery right there by the lake. The village of Skaneateles is quite quaint with nice homes, especially those along the lake. There are boat docks and it appears to be quite a recreational or resort area. We drove down the west side of the lake, which is in Cayuga County. The lake is not very wide, but is long and we drove quite a while south. It was now cloudy and threatening rain, but was also cooling off.

New Hope

Map of Niles. The area marked New Hope is near where Thomas Marsh lived. Toward the bottom is “Kellogsville” which is just north of the Burgess land and the Kellogsville Cemetery, which are on the Sempronius map below.

I had some maps, so we went directly to the New Hope Cemetery. We looked around and saw lots of Cadys, but unfortunately we don’t know which Cadys are related to Selinda Olive Cady Burgess.

We went to the New Hope Mills, which had been recommended. They were closed for the day. (This was just after 4:00) We did walk over the covered bridge and saw the 1823 vintage water wheel.

We drove around the area a little. There is a picnic area closer to the lake which is said to be a childhood play area of Millard Filmore. Not too far from it is the area on which is written T. Marsh on the 1853 Map.

We stopped here, where there is a beautiful view of the lake (would have been more beautiful without all the clouds). From the road the land slopes gently down to the lake. Across the road, going up a hill, is where the Marsh land would have been. This is mostly cleared farmland.

I assume that Samuel and Lurania Eggleston would have lived somewhere near there. Samuel went back to Sempronius after his family had moved to Springwater. His brief autobiography states:

“I lived in the town of Marcellus until I was 13 years old, then my father, with his family, then moved into the town of Springwater, Livingston County, state of New York. My brothers and sisters numbered ten in family. I lived with my father until I was 19 years old, then I went to live with my brother-in-law to learn the tanner’s trade. I lived with them until I was 23 years old . . .”

Thomas Marsh, who had married Samuel’s sister Lucy, would have been the brother-in-law Samuel would have lived with. It was while living here that Samuel married Lurania Powers Burgess, whose family lived nearby.

Sempronius, New York

Sempronius in Cayuga County, New York is where the Burgess family settled. Seth Burgess brought his family from Stillwater, Saratoga County to Sempronius around 1800. He purchased the entire Lot #47. According to maps the Kellogsville Cemetery was on this original land owned by Seth Burgess. The area consists of farms and some wooded areas.

Early map of Sempronius showing Lot #47 in the upper left corner, just below where it says “Kellogsville”

The original township of Sempronius was later divided up to create two additional towns – Niles and Moravia. Niles was to the north and we passed through that area first. Moravia was to the west and was where we later spent the night.

Kellogsville Cemetery – 1st Visit

We easily spotted the Kellogsville Cemetery and started looking around. I found Thomas and Lucy Eggleston Marsh’s graves. Thomas’s stone faces one way (the way most are facing) and Lucy’s next to it faces the other way. Leaning on Lucy’s stone is another broken off stone which is Lucy Marsh, a daughter of Thomas by his second wife, who died at age 14.

Headstones of Thomas and Lucy Eggleston Marsh with another stone of Thomas’ daughter Lucy leaning on Lucy’s

I was going around with my notebook writing inscriptions. Thomas’ stone reads:

Thomas Marsh born in Marlboro, VT Dec 22, 1790 died April 17, 1870

To live in Christ to die is vain

Lucy’s has a nice verse on it:

Mrs. Lucy, wife of Thomas Marsh died Nov 18, 1832 age 39 y 10 m 18 d

Go home my friends, Dry up your tears.

We shall meet again When Christ appears

I was walking around with my camera taking pictures. Then it started raining. At first it was light and I just kept on, then it started to get heavier and Dad got umbrellas from the motorhome. We must have looked like idiots wandering around in the rain, me clutching my notebook so it wouldn’t get wet. I wanted to find Seth and Olive Burgess, but the rain was really getting bad so we quit.

Refuge from the Storm

We drove in the rain down the old salt road (The road the Cemetery is on) to Sayles Corners, which was named after the Sayles family who migrated with the Burgess and Titus families. Then we drove on down to Moravia. We passed another large Cemetery, but didn’t stop. (As the trip went on every Cemetery we passed made me want to jump out and look at headstones.)

It was really pouring as we got to the Village of Moravia. I remember seeing Cady’s Tavern which I had read about. We found a Pizza Place, parked at a nearby bank parking lot and ran to it. Even with umbrellas, we were wet when we got there. This was the happening place in town. They did a take out business as well as having a few tables to eat in. We ordered and waited and waited. People kept coming in dripping wet to get take out orders. My feet and legs were covered with wet weeds from the Cemetery and even though it was raining it was still warm enough to be steamy. We finally got our pizza and ate it.

After eating, we got directions to Fillmore Glen Stake Park, which happened to be just down the road. When we got to the park, I made a phone call at the office to the Thorn Hill Church. I had contacted the pastor before our trip, so I wanted to let them know we would be there in the morning. I also tried to call the Sempronius Church but just got an answering machine and we had no number for them to call back.

Filmore Glen State Park was a nice park and campground, but it rained almost all night so it was too wet to enjoy it. The roof of the motorhome started leaking sometime in the night. Dad got up about 5 am to check on it, then our neighbors got up early so it was not a great night’s sleep.

Morning

In the morning we drove around the park a little. We saw Millard Fillmore’s cabin which is there at the park. I think it is the cabin where he was born. It is a simple small log cabin. Since he was a contemporary of Samuel and Lurania Eggleston, I think the early homes of the Burgess family there were probably similar cabins. Later they would have been added on to and improved or larger houses built.

We drove through the “glen” which is like a miniature grand canyon. It is interesting that just a short distance from the Village is this big gash in the earth which is actually quite deep. The area was really wooded and there were bugs. It had stopped raining but was foggy, giving the place an eerie look.

Sayles Corners Historical Marker

We drove back up through Sempronius and stopped at Sayles Corners to read the Historical marker. The Burgess’ land was just up the road, so they were quite close neighbors. I think Rhoda Titus must have lived somewhere in between those families.

Kellogsville Cemetery – 2nd visit

I wanted to look some more at the Kellogsville Cemetery for Seth and Olive Burgess, so we stopped and looked around again. I went to where I had left off, but Dad noticed another area we hadn’t even seen the day before. This was beyond a little gully and up on a little hill. It was very overgrown, not well taken care of like the rest of the Cemetery, and appeared to be the oldest part of the Cemetery.

Dad yelled to me “Does Olive Burgess mean anything?” He had found Seth and Olive’s graves. Seth’s stone is very worn and hard to read but it is next to Olive’s which is clear.

Headstones of Seth and Olive Burgess

Then Dad stepped on a stone laying on the ground. After removing some leaves we could see that it was Joel Burgess, their son who had died in 1807, probably one of the first burials there. We looked around and I was sad to see more broken and worn stones. I think Rhoda Titus must be buried there also, but probably unmarked or one of these unreadable stones.

I felt some satisfaction in finding these graves and was now ready to drive around the lake to Marcellus.

2001 An Eggleston Genealogy Odyssey – Part 3 Western New York

A continuation of the account of my journey with my Dad in 2001 when we visited sites significant to Eggleston genealogy. This Part 3 was in the Western part of New York August 8-9, 2001.

After leaving Nauvoo, Illinois we spent some time in Kirtland, Ohio. The Egglestons did not live there, but the Cheneys did. Dad and I did not do anything specifically related to Eggleston genealogy, so for the purposes of the blog, I will move on to Western New York.

We left Kirtland about 3:30 in the afternoon on August 8th. In Erie, Pennsylvania there was an accident, then road construction slowed us. We got off the freeway to get gas then seeing how backed up it was decided to try an alternate route. Later we managed to get back to the freeway and it was a little better. We split from the expressway as it entered New York. Then we took the southern route through Chautuaqua county.

Drive Through Chautauqua County

I was excited to see this area. I had done a good deal of research into family members who went to Chautuaqua County, New York. We didn’t stop because we were detoured around construction, so we really didn’t know where to go. We just drove around Chuatuaqua Lake which is pretty. I tried to take a picture from the moving vehicle, but it didn’t really capture it.

Chautauqua Lake

The country here was rolling hills and it appeared to be good farming land. We then drove on the Southern route through the Allegheny mountains. I hadn’t realized that New York had such mountains.

It was getting late and I was looking for a campground as we drove. We found the Sun Valley Campground near Arkport, New York. It was getting dark as we pulled in and we couldn’t find anyone in the office, so we just found a spot, then registered later. There weren’t restaurants around, so we zapped some microwave dinners. We planned to visit Springwater in the morning.

Why Springwater?

Springwater is a mysterious black hole of our family history. Samuel Eggleston‘s brief biography indicates that his father Samuel Jr. moved the family from Marcellus to Springwater when he was 13 years old. That places the move about 1817. Both of Samuel’s parents died in Sprinwater, Elizabeth in 1823 and Samuel in 1830. Many of their children married while they were in Springwater, but eventually they all moved away.

It has always seemed strange to me that Samuel apparently moved away from all the family in Marcellus to go to Springwater by himself. Most migrations were done as a family group, sometimes with members going at different times, but usually there was something to connect them to the new place.

Eggleston family members had started migrating to Chautauqua County, but Samuel chose to go to Springwater rather than join them there. I have begun to wonder if other family members went to Springwater with him, then quickly moved somewhere else. I also have to wonder if Samuel intended to join family in Cahutauqua County, but something caused him to stop and settle in Springwater. He did buy land there, so there must have been a plan to stay.

There may be some clues to the reason for this move in events of the year 1817.

1817 Mysteries

During early 1817 there were some interesting things happening in the Marcellus Baptist Church. Samuel Jr. joined the Marcellus Church in 1807 along with his brother Nathan. Elizabeth Eggleston was baptized a different day. John Eggleston, who may be another brother, also joined the Church that year.

Samuel had some difficulties with the Church beginning in 1816. Brothers were assigned to work with him. In March 1817, records indicated that he had a desire to continue with the Church, but on September 7, the members voted to exclude him.

In April of 1817, Elizabeth was given a letter of recommendation. This would be a letter to introduce her to another church, letting them know she had been a member in good standing. This letter would indicate that they were planning to move.  Also on April 17, 1817, Samuel and Elizabeth sold their land in Marcellus, which would also indicate plans to move.

That same year Oliver Eggleston joined the Marcellus Church, then quickly had some issues with them and he was excluded from membership. We know nothing about his life after that point. John, the one who also joined the church in 1807, and his wife Rachel sold their land in Marcellus in October of 1817. They then seem to have disappeared off the face of the earth.

The year 1817 could have been one of those “purging times” when the Church became strict about covenant behavior and excluded those who were not living up. Possibly these Egglestons may have had problems getting along with other church members and even family members. Maybe the conflicts were so severe that moving seemed a solution?

Both Samuel and John owned land along the lake. Were there issues with their land?

Seeing Springwater

As we drove into Springwater that morning, I saw why maps showed so many places called “gull”. The land is very hilly – full of hills and gullys, with the main part of town being in a small valley. A History of the town of Springwater placed the Eggleston farm “On the east hill south of the big gull.” There were so many hills and gulls and no way to tell which this referred to.  It is very wooded, but there are many farms. I thought that this would not be the easiest land to farm, though it is very pretty.

View of Springwater from the Ashley Cemetery on the south end of the town.

Searching Cemeteries

We began and ended Thursday August 9th in Cemeteries. Knowing that both Samuel and Elizabeth had died here, I was hoping to find their graves. I had searched online before going and found no online records of their graves, but I did find 10 Cemeteries. It would have taken lots of time to find and search all 10, so I picked out a few close to the main road. Some were well kept, but others very neglected. I could see the possibility of buried, broken or unreadable stones that might be theirs.

We stopped first at the Ashley Cemetery which is on the south end of the town up on a hill. There was a beautiful view from there and I took a picture. This was a nice, small, and well kept cemetery, but no Egglestons.

We looked for the Green Gull Cemetery, which seemed like a possibility since a town history placed Egglestons “On the east hill south of the bill gull.” After a few times down the road, we found “Greens Gull” a wooded gully which appeared to be private property with a home there. We saw no sign of a Cemetery.

Find a Grave currently has 67 memorials for graves there. The earliest burial was 1829. Interestingly Amos Root, who purchased Samuel Eggleston’s land from his children, is buried there. This cemetery actually may have been close to the Eggleston farm.

We then went to the main part of town, such as it is. There are really only a few buildings which would constitute “town”. The Capron Cemetery was a very small, old cemetery on a side street. We almost missed it altogether. This was a very sad place. Being so close to town, it was disappointing that it was so neglected. Many of the stones were broken, buried or unreadable. We looked but found nothing.

It is supposedly the oldest cemetery in town, with burials beginning in 1810. According to Find a Grave there are 27 known burials plus some unmarked fieldstones. It is possible that Samuel and Elizabeth are buried there, but we would never know if they were in one of those graves.

We went to another Cemetery in similar shape. This was the “Christian Church Cemetery”. There is no longer a church anywhere near. I had thought this less likely because the Egglestons were Baptists and “Christian Church” sound like it would be another denomination, but it was accessible so we looked around. It was very overgrown and the remains of a tree fort on the edge of it suggested that it had been some kind of spooky playground for kids. We didn’t find anything.

The last Cemetery we searched was the Evergreen Cemetery which was much nicer and kept up. It also had many newer graves and appeared to be still in use. The stones were easy to read but no familiar names.

Moving On

We finally bid farewell to Springwater, leaving behind the mystery of the burial places of Samuel and Elizabeth. We drove on winding country roads to Manchester and Palmyra.

2001 An Eggleston Genealogy Odyssey – Part 2 to Nauvoo, Illinois

On to Nauvoo, Illinois

The 2001 Eggleston Genealogy Odyssey continued after our visit to Winter Quarters and Council Bluffs, Iowa. After spending the night at a campground called “Sleepy Hollow”, Dad and I started early Monday August 5, and drove a few hours south from Iowa City. We crossed the Mississippi River on a Bridge by Fort Madison and drove into Nauvoo, Illinois from the east. What we saw was a small town on the bluff with some shops and houses and then right in front of us was the Nauvoo Temple under construction.

Nauvoo LDS Temple in 2001

Nauvoo Temple under construction in 2001

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Land Office

One of our first stops was the land office where we looked up where our ancestors had lived. We spent more time there than I expected and got quite a lot of information.

Historic Nauvoo Map

The Eggleston home on Block 62 and the Garlick home on Block 34. The Temple Block is the larger dark square in the Wells area

The Garlick home would have been a few blocks further beyond the trees in the photo below where it goes down into a gully. The Cheney family lived outside of town.

The Eggleston home

Scaffolding on the Temple in the middle of this shot from the area of the Eggleston home.

Looking toward where the land slopes down to a gully.

 

We found the lot where the Samuel Eggleston family lived (approximately). The Eggleston home in Nauvoo was located on Lot 1 of Block 62 on the corner of Hibbard and Woodruff Streets, only a few blocks north of the Temple site. Where this lot now sits, the street dead ends and there is a group of trees.

In August 2001, we could easily see the scaffolding on the tower of the Temple, then under reconstruction, from the Eggleston land. Depending on how many large trees were between them and the temple, Samuel and Lurania could have had a good view of the Temple being built. They may have been able to hear the sounds of construction from their home. Certainly it was a very short walk for Samuel to go there to help with the building. Their lot would have been large enough for a garden, but Samuel did not have sufficient land to farm in or outside of the city.

Shoemaker Shop

We went to main street and started with the Boot and Shoe Shop. One of the missionaries there mentioned that he was from Castle Dale, Utah and Dad had to ask if he knew about Wilsonville. He said his brother owns it. We had a nice discussion about Wilsonville. At another place there was a missionary who knew Mormon Row and had stayed at the Moulton’s place and looked at Grandpa’s collapsed cabin. It is a small world.

My Dad talking to the docent in front of the Shoe Shop

The shoemaking demonstration was very interesting. I kept thinking about Samuel. He was a shoemaker so the things we saw demonstrated would have been his daily work. At that time, shoemaking was quite an involved process. Besides the tanning of the leather, it included woodworking in making wooden shoe lasts and small wooden pegs with which to fasten on the soles, as well as the cutting and sewing of the leather pieces into shoes.

There were about six shoemaker shops in Nauvoo. Six shoemakers worked in this particular shop. It is likely that Samuel worked worked in such a shop with others, rather than having one of his own, though he could have worked out of his home.

In 1845 the “Tanners and Shoemakers Association” was formed in Nauvoo. It later expanded to include harnessmakers. They operated a tannery on Hibbard and Rich Streets near Colton’s brick yard, and a Boot, Shoe, Saddle and Harness Shop on Mulholland Street. The Association advertised in April 1845 for business as well as for calf-skins. Samuel very likely was a member of this Association and may have worked in the tannery or Boot and Shoe Shop.

Around Town

 

The Browning home and Gun Shop

We went to the Browning House and gun shop. It was interesting because we know the Browning family. They settled in Ogden, Utah. We learned some family history as well as information about the making of guns. I am pretty dumb about guns, so it was a learning experience for me. We also ran in to people we knew from home there. Small world again.

We visited the brick yard where we saw the process of making bricks. The Log School, the Tin Shop and the Bakery were interesting places we stopped. The Lyon Drug store was quite a large store with not only drugs but other typical articles that would have been in a general store. Our ancestors probably shopped there. An herb garden was outside which would have supplied many of the “drugs” in the store. The Lyons who owned this store were in-laws of Patty Sessions, the midwife who delivered Samuel Jr. in Winter Quarters. The log cabin next to the store was her home.

I must mention that it was very hot and humid. It was quite miserable being outside there. I thought it very interesting that these “restored” and reconstructed building which we were told had been build as the originals with the kinds of tools they had then and furnished with period furnishings, etc., all had AIR CONDITIONING. It was heaven to go inside. I was so glad they didn’t want to be so authentic as to make us tourists sweat.

Post office and Printing Office

The Post Office was of interest to me because we seem to have a history of Postal Work in our family. My grandfather Joseph Eggleston carried mail in Jackson Hole and had the Post Office in his home on Mormon Row. Selar Cheney had the Post Office in South Park named after him. Orson Hyde Eggleston was the Postmaster in Eden, Utah, and Samuel Eggleston was Deputy Postmaster in Pottawatamie County, Iowa. Sylvester Wilson had a Post Office at Wilsonville, Utah along the Old Spanish Trail.

The Printing Office and the Post Office behind the wagon

At the Post office they had the pigeonhole cabinet where letters were. They showed how they wrote both ways and folded the page into an envelop to conserve valuable paper. Postage was based on how far it was sent and it was usually sent postage due. It was expensive for the time so they were conservative.

The Printing Office showed the cases of type and how type was set then the page printed. It was interesting to think of Reuben and Orson Eggleston working in such a place, doing the tedious work of setting type.

 

Seventies Hall

 Nauvoo Seventies Hall

Seventies Hall

After walking through town we drove over to the Seventies Hall. It was quite an impressive building and we learned about it’s construction as well as about the purpose of it—to train missionaries. Upstairs were displays of artifacts that had been found as the restoration projects were done – lots of broken pottery and bottles. They told us that there had been a root cellar at Brigham Young’s home, which was basically a garbage dump after they built a new one attached to the house. Some of the broken dishes found were later glued together and now are displayed at his home.

We were able to look up ancestors who were seventies in the indexes and found some information about them. Most of this information was also at the Land and Records Office.

Samuel Eggleston, who was a Member of the Ninth Quorum of the Seventy. In the fall of 1844 several new Quorums of the Seventy were organized. The Ninth Quorum of Seventy was organized October 8, 1844. Samuel was ordained in October 1844, which was probably at the time this Quorum was organized. He is toward the beginning of the list of members. The Ninth Quorum recorded its first meeting October 16, 1844 in the Seventies Hall. Meeting notes included mention in most meetings of the members “speaking their feelings”.

Blacksmith Shop

Next to the Seventies Hall was the Blacksmith and Wheelwright Shop. We learned how a wagon and especially the wheels were made. When the Saints were preparing to leave Nauvoo, this was a major business and they had to work very quickly. At the Blacksmith shop the missionary actually made a small horseshoe while we watched and he talked. The term “smith’ refers to the smiting of metal. The term blacksmith apparently came from the process of dunking the shaped metal into horse manure or today oil is used, which turns it black.

I couldn’t help but try to imagine the Garlick family living in an abandoned blacksmith shop their first winter in Nauvoo.

Memorial Gazebo

Samuel Eggleston in the middle column

From there we went down to the river. There were water lillies floating on the water which were just beautiful. It really was a lovely and peaceful place. There is a Gazebo there with the names of people who died on the way west. Samuel Eggleston Jr. is listed there, as he died in Winter Quarters.

 

Other Visits and Activities

Though family history was one purpose of our trip, we were also very interested in L. D. S. Church History. So we of course saw all that there was to see and did all that we could fit in during our short trip. We went through homes of Brigham Young and some of the other Church leaders. We spent some time at the Red Brick store where the Relief Society was organized. A collection of artifacts which had been found in the city was on display there. We then went to the Mansion House and the Homestead where Joseph Smith and his family had lived.

The Missionaries presented a musical about the old days of Nauvoo in the Cultural Hall, which was very entertaining. Later in the evening we enjoyed the “Sunset on the Mississippi” program. There was a actually a very beautiful sunset, but it came with bugs. This really is a beautiful place and must have been so sad for our ancestors to have to leave their homes here.

We spent the night in the Nauvoo State Park Campground. In the morning we drove out to the Old Nauvoo Burial Ground. It is very peaceful out there and we were alone except for one small group who joined us for part of the time. Very few of the graves are identified, and many of the existing stones are broken, but there is a Gazebo with all the names. David Garlick died in Nauvoo and his name is on the monument. We were surprised that this cemetery was out of town as far as it was. They would have had lengthy funeral processions.

We then drove to Carthage to visit the Jail and Visitor’s Center there, before heading further east.

The Life and Untimely Death of Harvey Burgess Eggleston

Little is known of the details of the life of Harvey Burgess Eggleston. He was just becoming an adult when his life was cut short. We can only imagine what his life would have been like if he had lived, and wonder about the circumstances of his death.

Birth of Harvey Burgess Eggleston

Harvey Burgess Eggleston, the 5th child of Samuel and Lurania Powers Burgess Eggleston, was born February 8, 1836, In Sempronius, Cayuga County, New York. He was named for his grandfather Harvey Burgess. His parents lost their first 2 sons as infants, so when Harvey was born he had two older brothers.

 

Family Bible birth of Harvey Burgess Eggleston

The birth date of Harvey Burgess Eggleston was recorded in the Eggleston Family Bible – bottom on the left

Continue reading

The Very Brief Life of Samuel Eggleston IV

January 16th marks the anniversary of the birth of Samuel Eggleston, son of Samuel and Lurania Powers Burgess Eggleston. His birth, life and death occurred during a very dark time and place in the lives of his family and the larger community of Latter-day Saints. Early in 1846, the Saints were forced to leave their homes in Nauvoo, Illinois. The Eggleston family were not among the first to leave. They stayed until sometime in the spring of 1846 according to Samuel’s account. They may have stayed longer than others for financial reasons, or to help with the completion of the Temple which was dedicated May 1, 1846.

The Egglestons traveled to Winter Quarters in Nebraska, where the Saints had gathered to prepare to go further west. Small cabins were built where they spent a miserable winter. There was inadequate food for the many refugees camped there. There was also much disease which was easily spread. Many people died during that year, especially the very young and very old.

Birth of baby Samuel to Lurania and Samuel Eggleston

Lurania Powers Burgess Eggleston

Lurania Powers Burgess Eggleston

Lurania Powers Burgess Eggleston, who was 38 years old at that time, gave birth to a son on the bleak winter day of January 16th. Patty Sessions was a prominent midwife during that time. Fortunately for us, she kept records in her diary and an account book. Her notation under the date of 16 January was “Put sister Eggleston to bed with a son Samuel E.” “Putting to bed” was her way of noting the confinement and delivery of a baby. Patty’s account book showed that Samuel Eggleston paid $2.00 for her services January 16.

The birth of this child must have brought great joy to the family at a time of great suffering. He was given the name of his father – Samuel. He may have also been named after Samuel H. Smith who along with Orson Hyde had introduced the family to the Restored Gospel. (They had named their last born son Orson Hyde Eggleston)

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The First Christmas in Jackson Hole

The First Christmas in Jackson Hole was celebrated with elk steaks, doughnuts fried in bear grease, music and dancing.

The Wilson & Cheney Families

Sylvester Wilson had settled in Emery County, Utah in 1877 at a place that became known as Wilsonville. After almost 12 years in this drought stricken area, Sylvester Wilson decided to move and start again somewhere else.

Sylvester Wilson

Sylvester Wilson

Mary Wood Wilson

Mary Wood Wilson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sylvester and his family left Wilsonville at the end of May 1889. The group included Sylvester and his wife Mary, 9 unmarried children (the youngest being three) and two married children and their families. Mary Alice had married Selar Cheney August 10, 1879. They had four children, but one died before they left. Ervin had married Mary Jane Davis June 26, 1888 and she was expecting their first child as they left. Their son James was born September 12 in St. Anthony, Idaho.

The family left Wilsonville with 5 sturdy wagons and about 80 head of cattle. They also had at least 20 race horses, which Sylvester had taken as partial payment on their Wilsonville property. The trip to St. Anthony, Idaho was over 400 miles. They averaged about 10 miles per day, trailing their livestock.

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Early Eggleston Genealogical Research

When I began serious Eggleston genealogical research, I learned to look to earlier research first. It is always a good idea to check what has been done, so as to not waste time and effort. Unfortunately, I found that some earlier work was not correct. Errors and false assumptions had been perpetuated by those who accepted earlier works without necessarily thinking things through or further checking.

Early Correspondence

My Great-grandfather Orson H. Eggleston gathered genealogical information while serving a Mission for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Michigan in 1876-77. Apparently while there he corresponded with someone in New York City about the Eggleston family. He included this copy of a response with a letter to his father, seeking his father’s advice on how to respond. He seemed hopeful that this Nicholas would have helpful information. I am not sure what happened with this, but it does indicate how early Orson tried to learn more about the larger Eggleston family.

1876 Melville Eggleston genealogical research

In an earlier family letter Eliza Barron told her brother Samuel Eggleston about a letter she had received from Rev. A. Eggleston of Broome County, New York. He was requesting information about family members, including birth, death and marriage dates. Eliza seemed skeptical of his intentions and unsure of his address. It is not known what response Samuel gave her or if she ever sent any information to this person. This would have been the Ambrose mentioned in this letter from Melville, who apparently had been researching and collecting information on the Eggleston family.

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