2001 An Eggleston Genealogy Odyssey – Part 3 Western New York

A continuation of the account of my journey with my Dad in 2001 when we visited sites significant to Eggleston genealogy. This Part 3 was in the Western part of New York August 8-9, 2001.

After leaving Nauvoo, Illinois we spent some time in Kirtland, Ohio. The Egglestons did not live there, but the Cheneys did. Dad and I did not do anything specifically related to Eggleston genealogy, so for the purposes of the blog, I will move on to Western New York.

We left Kirtland about 3:30 in the afternoon on August 8th. In Erie, Pennsylvania there was an accident, then road construction slowed us. We got off the freeway to get gas then seeing how backed up it was decided to try an alternate route. Later we managed to get back to the freeway and it was a little better. We split from the expressway as it entered New York. Then we took the southern route through Chautuaqua county.

Drive Through Chautauqua County

I was excited to see this area. I had done a good deal of research into family members who went to Chautuaqua County, New York. We didn’t stop because we were detoured around construction, so we really didn’t know where to go. We just drove around Chuatuaqua Lake which is pretty. I tried to take a picture from the moving vehicle, but it didn’t really capture it.

Chautauqua Lake

The country here was rolling hills and it appeared to be good farming land. We then drove on the Southern route through the Allegheny mountains. I hadn’t realized that New York had such mountains.

It was getting late and I was looking for a campground as we drove. We found the Sun Valley Campground near Arkport, New York. It was getting dark as we pulled in and we couldn’t find anyone in the office, so we just found a spot, then registered later. There weren’t restaurants around, so we zapped some microwave dinners. We planned to visit Springwater in the morning.

Why Springwater?

Springwater is a mysterious black hole of our family history. Samuel Eggleston‘s brief biography indicates that his father Samuel Jr. moved the family from Marcellus to Springwater when he was 13 years old. That places the move about 1817. Both of Samuel’s parents died in Sprinwater, Elizabeth in 1823 and Samuel in 1830. Many of their children married while they were in Springwater, but eventually they all moved away.

It has always seemed strange to me that Samuel apparently moved away from all the family in Marcellus to go to Springwater by himself. Most migrations were done as a family group, sometimes with members going at different times, but usually there was something to connect them to the new place.

Eggleston family members had started migrating to Chautauqua County, but Samuel chose to go to Springwater rather than join them there. I have begun to wonder if other family members went to Springwater with him, then quickly moved somewhere else. I also have to wonder if Samuel intended to join family in Cahutauqua County, but something caused him to stop and settle in Springwater. He did buy land there, so there must have been a plan to stay.

There may be some clues to the reason for this move in events of the year 1817.

1817 Mysteries

During early 1817 there were some interesting things happening in the Marcellus Baptist Church. Samuel Jr. joined the Marcellus Church in 1807 along with his brother Nathan. Elizabeth Eggleston was baptized a different day. John Eggleston, who may be another brother, also joined the Church that year.

Samuel had some difficulties with the Church beginning in 1816. Brothers were assigned to work with him. In March 1817, records indicated that he had a desire to continue with the Church, but on September 7, the members voted to exclude him.

In April of 1817, Elizabeth was given a letter of recommendation. This would be a letter to introduce her to another church, letting them know she had been a member in good standing. This letter would indicate that they were planning to move.  Also on April 17, 1817, Samuel and Elizabeth sold their land in Marcellus, which would also indicate plans to move.

That same year Oliver Eggleston joined the Marcellus Church, then quickly had some issues with them and he was excluded from membership. We know nothing about his life after that point. John, the one who also joined the church in 1807, and his wife Rachel sold their land in Marcellus in October of 1817. They then seem to have disappeared off the face of the earth.

The year 1817 could have been one of those “purging times” when the Church became strict about covenant behavior and excluded those who were not living up. Possibly these Egglestons may have had problems getting along with other church members and even family members. Maybe the conflicts were so severe that moving seemed a solution?

Both Samuel and John owned land along the lake. Were there issues with their land?

Seeing Springwater

As we drove into Springwater that morning, I saw why maps showed so many places called “gull”. The land is very hilly – full of hills and gullys, with the main part of town being in a small valley. A History of the town of Springwater placed the Eggleston farm “On the east hill south of the big gull.” There were so many hills and gulls and no way to tell which this referred to.  It is very wooded, but there are many farms. I thought that this would not be the easiest land to farm, though it is very pretty.

View of Springwater from the Ashley Cemetery on the south end of the town.

Searching Cemeteries

We began and ended Thursday August 9th in Cemeteries. Knowing that both Samuel and Elizabeth had died here, I was hoping to find their graves. I had searched online before going and found no online records of their graves, but I did find 10 Cemeteries. It would have taken lots of time to find and search all 10, so I picked out a few close to the main road. Some were well kept, but others very neglected. I could see the possibility of buried, broken or unreadable stones that might be theirs.

We stopped first at the Ashley Cemetery which is on the south end of the town up on a hill. There was a beautiful view from there and I took a picture. This was a nice, small, and well kept cemetery, but no Egglestons.

We looked for the Green Gull Cemetery, which seemed like a possibility since a town history placed Egglestons “On the east hill south of the bill gull.” After a few times down the road, we found “Greens Gull” a wooded gully which appeared to be private property with a home there. We saw no sign of a Cemetery.

Find a Grave currently has 67 memorials for graves there. The earliest burial was 1829. Interestingly Amos Root, who purchased Samuel Eggleston’s land from his children, is buried there. This cemetery actually may have been close to the Eggleston farm.

We then went to the main part of town, such as it is. There are really only a few buildings which would constitute “town”. The Capron Cemetery was a very small, old cemetery on a side street. We almost missed it altogether. This was a very sad place. Being so close to town, it was disappointing that it was so neglected. Many of the stones were broken, buried or unreadable. We looked but found nothing.

It is supposedly the oldest cemetery in town, with burials beginning in 1810. According to Find a Grave there are 27 known burials plus some unmarked fieldstones. It is possible that Samuel and Elizabeth are buried there, but we would never know if they were in one of those graves.

We went to another Cemetery in similar shape. This was the “Christian Church Cemetery”. There is no longer a church anywhere near. I had thought this less likely because the Egglestons were Baptists and “Christian Church” sound like it would be another denomination, but it was accessible so we looked around. It was very overgrown and the remains of a tree fort on the edge of it suggested that it had been some kind of spooky playground for kids. We didn’t find anything.

The last Cemetery we searched was the Evergreen Cemetery which was much nicer and kept up. It also had many newer graves and appeared to be still in use. The stones were easy to read but no familiar names.

Moving On

We finally bid farewell to Springwater, leaving behind the mystery of the burial places of Samuel and Elizabeth. We drove on winding country roads to Manchester and Palmyra.

Cemetery Tour – South Park Cemetery, Jackson, Wyoming

A virtual Cemetery Tour of the South Park Cemetery, the resting place of many of our Wilson and Cheney ancestors.

My Introduction to this Cemetery

My first visit to the South Park Cemetery in Jackson, Wyoming was in August 2002. Our family had enjoyed vacationing in Jackson Hole for years before I learned enough of our family history to search out graves of our ancestors. For this particular trip, my father joined us. Because he is an early riser and my husband and children are not, nor were they interested in being drug through a cemetery at any hour, Dad and I went alone early one morning.

South Park Cemetery, Jackson, Wyoming

The cemetery sits on a hill, south of the town of Jackson, in the area known as South Park where Sylvester Wilson settled in 1889. There are spectacular views from this point. The cemetery itself is not large and most of it was rather overgrown. A fence enclosed many of the Wilson family graves.

The Beginning of the Cemetery

The Wilson and Cheney families had come to Jackson Hole in 1889. They had two years before there was a need for a cemetery. That need came because of a diphtheria epidemic. This started on the Idaho side of the Tetons. Sylvester’s son John had gone to meet his sister Rebecca who had not seen her family since her marriage in 1889. She wanted to come visit the family. The nearest railroad stop was Eagle Rock. For some reason Rebecca was not able to make the trip. John received this news when he arrived at Eagle Rock. He then decided to visit his Uncle Nick Wilson. Nick was away from home  doctoring victims of this epidemic, while three of his children died at his home.

John was exposed to this disease and carried it across the mountains. When he returned home he bathed and thoroughly washed his clothes before entering the house, but still the disease spread. It claimed two of the Wilson children, thirteen year old Sarah Ellen “Ella” on June 12, 1891, and ten year old Joseph on June 30, 1891.

There is a lone pine tree which stands out on the hill and can be seen for miles around. I recall being told a story about this tree being planted when these children died. I now can’t find any details of that story. The tree still stands, however, and is very large as can be seen by the contrast with the truck parked by it.

Marker Commemorating the 100th Anniversary of the Cemetery

1891       SOUTH PARK CEMETERY      1991

This, the first cemetery in Jackson Hole, was begun in 1891 during the diphtheria epidemic with the deaths of Sarah and Joseph Wilson. It is hereby dedicated in its centennial in honor of their parents:

1840 Sylvester Wilson 1895

1844 Mary Wood Wilson 1915

Sylvester led the first families to settle in Jackson’s Hole over Teton Pass in November 1889, in the first assembled wagons to come into the valley. He was a faithful member of the Mormon Church and organized its first branch here in 1893. The first school was held in his home in 1892, and he was instrumental in getting the first County School District in the valley. He brought the first hand operated sawmill and riding plow into Jackson Hole. He was a musician and played the fiddle at community affairs. He was a leader of men. Mary was a midwife and administered to the sick. They had 12 children and strove for the best possible education for pioneer families. They were hardy, public-spirited pioneers, prominent ranchers and stalwart pillars of Jackson’s Hole, contributing greatly to its progress, it’s productivity and its culture.

This old stone was probably one of the first placed in the cemetery

Sylvester and Mary Wood Wilson

There are two large Wilson markers within the fence. The one has Sylvester Wilson on one side, Mary Wood Wilson on another side as seen in the smaller photo, and Ellen and Joseph, the children who died in 1891 on the other side showing in this photo.

Sylvester Wilson A Minute Man in Every Sense of the Word

This other marker with a fancy top, also appears to be for Sylvester Wilson.

Mary Wilson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There are smaller markers for Sarah Ellen and Joseph, the children who died in 1891.

Wilson Family Members

The South Park Cemetery contains graves of many members of the Wilson family. I did not take photos of all of them. Most can be found on Find a Grave. Uncle Nick is my exception. His grave is here as well as markers commemorating his experience with the Pony Express.

The Pony Express Markers

 

 

 

THE PONY EXPRESS 1860-1861
A colorful chapter of American history was the Pony Express. For a year and a half prior to completion of the first transcontinental telegraph, young men riding fast horses carried the mail between St. Joseph, Missouri and Sacramento, California via Salt Lake City, Utah.

Clad in red shirts, blue denim trousers and leather boots, these courageous youth rode at breakneck speed through darkness or night and blaze of day, in storms, wind and sun, across burning deserts of sand and alkali, over snow-covered mountains, through roaring swollen streams, and through hostile Indian country. Several of the 114 riders lost their lives to Indian attacks.

Among those severely wounded was Elijah Nicholas “Nick” Wilson (1842-1915), a young Mormon boy who had lived with the Shoshone Indians in Idaho. He later founded the town of Wilson, in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. His autobiography, “The White Indian Boy” or “Uncle Nick among the Shoshones” is an American classic.

This Pony Express plaque was issued in his honor. It was presented to Utah State University in 1974 by his sons, Charles A. and George W. Wilson

Selar and Mary Alice Wilson Cheney

Selar Cheney took his family to Jackson Hole along with his wife Mary Alice’s family. They both died and were buried here along with most of their children. Mary Ellen died in Castledale, Emery County, Utah before the family came to Jackson Hole. Talitha Cuma Cheney Eggleston died in Ogden, Utah and is buried with her husband in the Eden Meadow View Cemetery.

Cheney, Ralph Wilson 1882-1919 May L. Sanborn 1877-1929 Ralph Sanborn 1914-1987 Irene Anderson Sullivan 1916-1974 Wyoma Rose Baley “Mrs. Gus” Lieutenant Army Nurse Corp. W. W. 2 Eto 66 Hospital Train 1919

 

David Henry Cheney Aug 5, 1888- Jan 3 1941 Lila Josephine Cheney Dec 14, 1887- July 2, 1984

 

Joseph H. Cheney Wyoming Pvt. 145 Field Artillery 40 Div W. W. 1 June 30, 1891 – July 3, 1949 Cheney, Pearl E. Mangum, wife of Joseph Howard Aug 2, 1905 – June 3, 1976 2nd marriage H.N. Hamilton

 

John F. Cheney Jan 4, 1885-Jan 31, 1937

I made another trip to this cemetery years later. On the drive up, I was surprised to see land being cleared in preparation for some kind of development. I wonder what our ancestors would think of their peaceful cemetery on a hill now surrounded by homes and I think a golf course. The view is still beautiful, if you look up.

Note:

Photos and information about these families is in my book Cheney Wilson Family History Book.

2001 An Eggleston Genealogy Odyssey – Part 1 to Iowa

I learned a great deal about our family history during a 2001 road trip tracing our family’s migration route in reverse – An Eggleston Genealogy Odyssey.

The Eggleston Genealogy Odyssey Begins

Eggleston Genealogy transportation

This is the only photo I took of the motorhome on the trip. Skaneateles Lake is in the background

In August 2001, I invited myself on a journey with my Dad. Mom passed away in November 2000. She and Dad had traveled around much of the country in their motorhome. That summer, Dad wanted to drive to New Hampshire to visit my sister. It was a trip he had made several times with Mom, but I was concerned about him traveling that far by himself. (He later made many solitary trips – just not that far) I also was up for a visit with my sister. We learned that my other sister would be staying with them for a while in between moves, so it was a 2 for 1. After doing a good decade of genealogy research, I saw an opportunity to see some of the places our ancestors had lived. I eagerly offered to accompany Dad so he wouldn’t be lonely on this trip. Thus began a journey to a family reunion which traced our family’s migration route across the country – in reverse. A journey back to our beginnings, almost.

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The Very Brief Life of Samuel Eggleston IV

January 16th marks the anniversary of the birth of Samuel Eggleston, son of Samuel and Lurania Powers Burgess Eggleston. His birth, life and death occurred during a very dark time and place in the lives of his family and the larger community of Latter-day Saints. Early in 1846, the Saints were forced to leave their homes in Nauvoo, Illinois. The Eggleston family were not among the first to leave. They stayed until sometime in the spring of 1846 according to Samuel’s account. They may have stayed longer than others for financial reasons, or to help with the completion of the Temple which was dedicated May 1, 1846.

The Egglestons traveled to Winter Quarters in Nebraska, where the Saints had gathered to prepare to go further west. Small cabins were built where they spent a miserable winter. There was inadequate food for the many refugees camped there. There was also much disease which was easily spread. Many people died during that year, especially the very young and very old.

Birth of baby Samuel to Lurania and Samuel Eggleston

Lurania Powers Burgess Eggleston

Lurania Powers Burgess Eggleston

Lurania Powers Burgess Eggleston, who was 38 years old at that time, gave birth to a son on the bleak winter day of January 16th. Patty Sessions was a prominent midwife during that time. Fortunately for us, she kept records in her diary and an account book. Her notation under the date of 16 January was “Put sister Eggleston to bed with a son Samuel E.” “Putting to bed” was her way of noting the confinement and delivery of a baby. Patty’s account book showed that Samuel Eggleston paid $2.00 for her services January 16.

The birth of this child must have brought great joy to the family at a time of great suffering. He was given the name of his father – Samuel. He may have also been named after Samuel H. Smith who along with Orson Hyde had introduced the family to the Restored Gospel. (They had named their last born son Orson Hyde Eggleston)

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Cemetery Tour – Kinne Cemetery and the Open Vault

Ron Eggleston made a trip this summer to upstate New York where his branch of the Eggleston family lived, died and many are buried. He explored the Kinne Cemetery where he found family headstones.

Grave of Asa Eggleston (ll) in Old Kinne Cemetery, Antwerp NY

Grave of Asa Eggleston (ll) in Old Kinne Cemetery, Antwerp NY

 

Grave marker for John Mitchell Eggleston and his two wives, Old Kinne Cemetery, Antwerp

Grave marker for John Mitchell Eggleston and his two wives, Old Kinne Cemetery, Antwerp

Monument of Joel and Sophia Eggleston and three of their children, Old Kinne Cemetery

Monument of Joel and Sophia Eggleston and three of their children, Old Kinne Cemetery

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ron found an open vault there in the cemetery, which stirred his curiosity. His inquiry led to a family story, which had inspired some local folklore and creepy activities. Details of this story were found in a newspaper article in the Commercial Advertiser of Canton, N.Y. dated Tuesday, July 11, 1916. This article was titled: “Mystery of Open Vault: Gruesome Night in Northern New York Cemetery”

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Cemetery Tour – Eden Meadow View Cemetery

My childhood memories of Memorial Day include traditional visits to “the valley” – Ogden Valley. I remember some visits with Grandpa and Grandma Eggleston on their farm, then after Grandpa passed away we visited Grandma Stella. We would always visit this little Cemetery to put flowers on graves even when there were no living grandparents to visit.

IMG_1463 Eden Cem 2

View of Cemetery facing what was Orson H. Eggleston’s farm 2015

The Meadow View Cemetery in Eden, Utah was established on land that was owned by Orson Hyde Eggleston. Orson moved from Ogden to Eden in the fall of 1877, purchasing the home and farm of Richard Ballantyne.  In 1882 a committee was formed to pursue the creation of a cemetery, apparently a piece of Orson’s land was offered. There were some issues involved with this as was reported in the Eden Ward records: “Bishop John Farrell stated that he wished to say something in regards to the burying ground for our dead, as the people were not satisfied with it at present. He wished Brother Eggleston to make a statement in regard to the land which had been purchased for that purpose located in his field. He (brother Eggleston) stated that he let the people have the land with the understanding that they pay him $25.00 for the same, which as yet he had never been paid. It was decided that the teachers, in visiting the people, inquire of them if they were willing to buy the land from brother Eggleston and have it fenced in and deed to the people, that they may be sure of a place to bury their dead, and report at the next priesthood meeting what the people are willing to do in regards to this matter.” November 30, 1882 “the committee appointed to see to the grave yard reported their success in purchasing the land for the same and what it would cost to fence it in by itself.”(Melba and Ren Colvin, History of the Eden Ward, Ogden Stake Utah 1877-1977, 1977) Continue reading

Cemetery Tours – Ogden City Cemetery

I have had the opportunity to visit the graves of many of our ancestors. I am one of those crazy people who drags family member – especially my children – to cemeteries. I hunt for graves in all kinds of weather, take lots of pictures and even make headstone rubbings. So for those who haven’t had such opportunities here is a virtual cemetery tour.

EGGLESTONS IN THE OGDEN CITY CEMETERY

The Ogden City Cemetery is located on 20th Street west of Monroe Ave. in Ogden, Utah. It is up on the hill above and south of the Ogden River. Orson Hyde Eggleston bought a family plot there. It is located just off 3rd Ave. – B-2-30 – Slightly north of halfway between Center St. and South Street. Orson’s mother Lurania Powers Burgess Eggleston was the first to be buried in this plot. Samuel Eggleston, her husband, was later buried next to her. The markers were probably upright initially, but have since been placed flat in the ground.

Lurania grave

In Memory of Lurania P. Eggleston wife of Samuel Eggleston Born Aug 15, 1808 Died July 6th 1870

Samuel E grave

Headstone for Samuel Eggleston Born Mar 30th 1804 Died May 27th 1884

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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