Ambrose Hill, Revolutionary War Soldier and Patriot

Ambrose Hill was born March 21, 1744 in Goshen, Litchfield, Connecticut. He died February 26, 1816 in Cornwall, Addison, Vermont. He was buried in Cornwall. He was on a list of Revolutionary War Soldiers buried in Cornwall, Vermont. Ambrose married Lucy Beach October 10, 1764 in Goshen, Litchfield, Connecticut. Lucy Beach was born January 27, 1746 in Goshen, Litchfield, Connecticut. She died March 18, 1838, in Cornwall, Addison, Vermont.

Ambrose Hill served in the Revolutionary War. His widow Lucy received a Pension for his service. According to information in his Pension file ( Pension File No. W21338 ) Ambrose Hill was a resident of Richmond, Berkshire County, Massachusetts, when he enlisted in April 1775. He served 15 days as a Corporal under Colonel Patterson; six months as Orderly Sargent under Aaron Rowley, Colonel Jonathan Smith; one month and four days as Captain under Colonel Powell, and was in the battles of Bunker Hill, Benington, Stillwater, and at the surrender of Burgoyne and evacuation of Ticonderoga.

The Colonists in Berkshire County were very involved in the beginning events of the Revolution. When news from Lexington and Concord came in April 1775, two Berkshire regiments immediately started marching to Boston. One unit under Col. Patterson of Lenox was stationed at Cambridge, but did not get to Bunker Hill for that battle. Both regiments were involved in repelling a landing party at East Cambridge and many soldiers stayed at Boston until it was evacuated March 16, 1776. Under the leadership of Joseph Raymond and Aaron Rowley most of the volunteers continued to serve as a unit throughout the early part of the war.

Ambrose Hill would have been among those early Berkshire Volunteers under Col. Patterson. Ambrose was a Corporal with Capt. David Rosseter’s Company in Col. John Patterson’s regiment which marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775. This was the same day that the first shots were fired at Lexington, Massachusetts. His service was from April 23, 1775 to May 8, 1775. He was listed as Sergeant with Capt. David Noble’s Company, Col. John Paterson’s Regiment, serving 7 days from April 22, 1775, which company marched in response to the alarm of April 19, 1775. The Battle of Bunker Hill was fought on June 17, 1775. These dates would indicate that Ambrose did not serve then, however the next entry showed that later that year Ambrose was again with John Paterson’s Regiment, muster roll dated Aug 1, 1775. This indicates that he enlisted April 19, 1775 and served 3 months 9 days with company return date October 6, 1775. He apparently served during that entire first summer. There was mention of an order for a bounty coat or its equivalent in money dated Fort No. 3, Charlestown, October 26, 1775.

Ambrose served as Sergeant in a company of Massachusetts militia in the vicinity of Boston until the British troops left Boston in the spring of the year 1776. Later, he served as Captain of a company of Massachusetts militia and he commanded a company that marched from Richmond to New Haven, Connecticut where he served as Captain sometime over two months. He received a Captains commission.

Later service in 1777 would have been in the battles in the Ticonderoga and Saratoga area. Ambrose was a Sergeant in Capt. Amos Rathbun’s Company, Maj. Caleb Hyde’s detachment of militia from July 8, 1777 to July 26, 1777 (19 days). His company marched to reinforce the northern army and was discharged 97 miles from home. At this point in the war, General Burgoyne had advanced down the Richeleau River to Lake Champlain with a massive army. Fort Ticonderoga was at that time badly in disrepair and the soldiers were lacking adequate supplies. When General St. Clair learned that the British had cannon on Mt. Defiance, it was felt that they would not be able to hold the fort and therefore he ordered an evacuation of Fort Ticonderoga. Many felt this was a cowardly act and he later faced a Court Martial, however his intent appeared to be to save his troops, rather than have them killed in a battle that could not have been won. The Evacuation of Ticonderoga took place July 5-6, 1777. Ambrose Hill probably was not at the fort, but was with troops sent there to assist them. After taking Fort Ticonderoga, the British advanced overland southward. This was a difficult march because of the tremendous amount of supplies they were carrying and the rugged nature of this wilderness they traveled through. The Colonial troops were able to slow their march even further by creating diversions and destroying the roads in their path.

Part of the Colonial Troops went east into Vermont, and Ambrose was probably with these. The next term of service listed for him was as Captain in Aaron Rowley’s Company, Col. David Rosseter’s detachment of Berkshire Co. militia, serving from August 13, 1777 to August 20, 1777, 7 days at Bennington. They would have joined troops from Ticonderoga and fought in the Battle of Bennington, Vermont August 16, 1777, where they defeated the Hessian forces. David Rossiter, Aaron Rowley and other officers of the Berkshire militia became quite famous.

The battles at Stillwater, where Burgoyne eventually surrendered, took place in late September and into October of 1777. A “Massachusetts Soldiers and Sailors in the War of the Revolution” reference would indicate Ambrose did not serve long enough to be involved at Stillwater, however a DAR letter indicated he served 6 months as orderly Sargent under Aaron Rowley, which would have extended through the entire time of the events at Stillwater. After the Surrender of Burgoine at Saratoga, the Berkshire units broke up and the soldiers joined various other regiments.

At some period during the War, Ambrose served in the army in the State of New Jersey and Lucy thought that was as Captain and that he was there in a battle.

As Captain 11th Co. 3d Berkshire Co. Regt. Of Mass. Militia, Ambrose was on a list of officers commissioned March 1778. Then as Captain in Lieut Col Miles Powell’s (Berkshire Co) Regit, he was engaged July 18, 1779 and discharged Aug 22, 1779, serving 1 month 10 days at New Haven, Connecticut, including 5 days (110 miles) travel home.

The Pension File indicated that Ambrose Hill was married at Goshen, Connecticut, October 10, 1764 to Lucia Beach. He died at Cornwall, Vermont in February 1816, and she was allowed a pension for his services on her application executed October 31, 1836, at which time she was a resident of Shoreham, Addison County, Vermont, aged “ninety years and upwards.”

While Ambrose was away serving in the war Lucy was at home with several small children. She stated in her deposition that “she was left at home in charge of her family consisting of six small children and that she underwent much fear and alarm in consequence of the Torris which were numerous in that part of Massachusetts where she resided.”

At the time of the Pension application, which was shortly after the Pension Act of July 4, 1836 was passed, Lucy was quite old and not able to remember the specific times of service. Apparently because of this, the application was delayed and other depositions taken to try to confirm the places and times of service. This all took considerable time and must have been quite an ordeal. A letter in the file dated January 26, 1837 stated, “I have made an unsuccessful search for the alleged service of Ambrose Hill as a sergeant in 1775, and as an adjutant in 1777. The name of his Captain in 1775 is not given, one thinks it was Porter.” They requested names of officers. He did serve 1 month 10 days as Captain in 1779 in Connecticut, July 1777 as sergeant in A. Rathbun’s Company 13 days and held a commission as Captain in March 1778. In June 1837, Lucy consented to receive a certificate for the amount which they said was allowed: 1 month 4 days as Captain, 15 days as Corporal, 6 months as sergeant. Apparently since no more specifics could be documented, she settled for a pension based on this time of service. It does appear from recollections of the family and others who made depositions that he would have served for much longer. The official certificate indicated service at Bunker Hill, Bennington and Saratoga.

(This information was taken from The Joseph Eggleston Family: Seven Generations from Joseph (d. 1767) of Stonington, Connecticut to Joseph (1885-1965) of Utah & Wyoming, Including Maternal Lines: Hill, Burgess, Titus, Sammis & Johnson, by Karen Eggleston Stark)

Sources of information:

History of Berkshire County, Massachusetts: with biographical sketches of its prominent men, Vol. 2 (Photo reproduction of original published: New York: J. B. Beers, 1885) (974.41 H 2hb) Rev. A. B. Whipple, Chapter XXV Town of Richmond, p. 481.

Katharine Huntington Annin, Richmond, Masachusetts: The story of a Berkshire town and its people, 1765-1965. (Richmond, Massachusetts: distributed by Richmond Civic Association, 1964) (974.411 RI H2a); History of Berkshire County

“Massachusetts Soldiers and Sailors in the War of the Revolution” Vol. 7, p. 865

Smith, H. P., History of Addison County, Vermont: with illustrations and biographical sketches of some of its prominent men and pioneers. Syracuse, NY: D. Mason & Company, 1886, p. 416-417. (974.35 H2s )

The National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution Vol. 70 p. 54. Vol. 113 p. 134.

This was also published on the Golden Spike Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution website.

Seth Burgess, Revolutionary War Soldier & Patriot

Seth Burgess was born May 31, 1745 in Canterbury, Windham, Connecticut.  He died January 24, 1814 in Sempronius, Cayuga, New York. He was buried in the Kellogsville Cemetery in Sempronius in February 1814. He married Selinda Olive Cady about 1767. She was born November 16, 1748 in Windham County, Connecticut. She died August 20, 1837 in Sempronius, Cayuga, New York.

Seth Burgess served in the Revolutionary War from Berkshire County, Massachusetts. The early history of Berkshire County parallels the history of the Revolution. In its earliest days there were stirrings of rebellion and the residents of Berkshire were very involved. In 1777 it was voted that in order to encourage enlistment in the Continental Army, a bounty of $10 would be assessed to anyone refusing to serve. Later, in August 1777, it was voted that if any one drafted to serve should refuse to march or to get a substitute, he would be fined $40. This money was to help pay the soldiers. Seth Burgess apparently took the option to serve in the Army.

According to the application made by Jonathan Burgess for a Pension for his father’s service (Pension File # W 16875), Seth was living in the town of Dalton (now called Hinsdale), Berkshire County when the war began. He served as a Lieutenant until the end of the war. He was at the Battle of Bunker Hill and Stillwater at the taking of Burgoyne. He was with Gen. Sullivan through the Northern Country. Official records indicated that he was a Lieutenant in the Company commanded by Captain Heeler of the Reg. Commanded by Col. Simond in the Massachusetts line for 12 months 16 days. “Seth Burgess is born upon a payroll of Capt David Wheeler’s Company in Col. Benjamin Simond’s Reg. For service at Ticonderoga as a Lieutenant from Dec. 16, 1776 to March 22, 1777, 97 days. Said roll was sworn to in Berkshire County September 8, 1777. Upon a payroll of Capt Peter Porter’s Company in Col. John Brown’s Reg of militia from the County of Berkshire as a Lieutenant from September 22 to October 8, 1777 16 days. Upon a payroll of Capt Enoch Noble’s Company in Col. Ezra Wood’s Regt. as a Lieutenant from May 20, 1778 to February 7, 1779 8 months & 23 days. Said roll was sworn to in Berkshire County May 15, 1777. And the above is all the evidence of service which can be identified as that of the individual described in the annexed application.”

While Seth was away serving in the Revolutionary war, his wife Olive was alone with small children for months at a time. There was a family record, probably taken from a Bible, in the Revolutionary War Pension File. It listed the family:

burgessfamily

After the War, Seth moved his family from Massachusetts to Stillwater, Saratoga County, New York where he had served.

(This information was taken from The Joseph Eggleston Family: Seven Generations from Joseph (d. 1767) of Stonington, Connecticut to Joseph (1885-1965) of Utah & Wyoming, Including Maternal Lines: Hill, Burgess, Titus, Sammis & Johnson, by Karen Eggleston Stark)

From Abstracts of Revolutionary War Pension Files: Burgess, Seth, Olive W16875, MA Line, sol’s son Jonathan Burgess aged 75 in 1846 a res of Sempronius in Cayuga Cty NY states sol d in Jan 1814 leaving a wid Olive who d 20 Aug 1837 & they had m in 1768, wid d leaving children: Jonathan, Selinda Calwell of Saratoga NY, Olive Carrol of Sempronius NY & Harvey Burges of Perry in Wyoming Cty, NY, family records; sol was b 31 May 1745, wife Olive was b 16 Nov 1747, children were: Joel b 5 Apr 1769, Jonathan b 24 Oct 1770, Selinda b 25 Dec 1771, Seth b 28 Jul 1774, Olive b 25 Dec 1775, Henery (Harvey) b 31 May 1778 & Reuben b 19 Apr 1780, also shown were: Erastus Burgess b 23 mar 1798, Usina Burgess b 7 Jan 1800, Norton Burgess b 25 Sep 1801 (their relationship to sol not stated)

This was also posted on Golden Spike Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution

Doc’s Memories of Melvin Eggleston

Melvin Eggleston was born April 7, 1922 in Eden, Utah, the son of Joseph S. and Talitha Cuma Cheney Eggleston.

F046crop

Melvin at age 6

Melvin Eggleston was born and raised in Eden and went to the same schools as the others. Melvin’s special talent was his personality, almost everyone liked him. He did have one fight, but that person became a friend. When he was going to Huntsville he tried to get Dale and me involved with his girlfriend’s sisters. He was active in sports.

01-22-02 - Melvin Eggleston fourth from left, DeLoss Far Right

Melvin #7 with a basketball

Dale Melvin orchestra

Melvin standing on the right with his tuba

He played the tuba in the school orchestra. After school he was pretty much on his own. He tried many things including driving a Taxi. I never figured that out because of his age.

01-23-02 - Melvin (Navy)

Melvin in Marine Uniform

During World War II, Melvin enlisted in the Marines. After boot camp he got involved with the orchestra and played a little with them but there was too much competition. After a major problem, he got a job as a driver for the Colonel in Hawaii. After another problem, he was sent to New Zealand and was trained for Island hopping. While there he got a jeep and drove over the area naturally finding friends or making friends. From there he was involved in taking three islands. Then on Guam he got hit. The shell tore the skin off his back and left shrapnel in his leg. The medics took one look at him and decided that he was gone so they left him. His companion and friend picked him up and put him in the ambulance. When he got to the Doctor he said it probably was good that the medics did not treat him. They would have done more damage. His back was still solid and the skin could be stretched over the bones. He had shrapnel in his leg for the rest of his life. He received a Purple Heart.

SOE Photo Journal page 44 of 58 (5)

Melvin married Maxine Ann Ewaldt on April 21, 1946 in El Monte, California.

Mel & Maxine's Wedding Day

Mel & Maxine’s Wedding Day

01-23-07 - Mel and Maxine

Maxine & Mel

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mel and Maxine made their home in Montebello, California, where they raised their sons.

Mel & Maxine's home in Montebello

Mel & Maxine’s home in Montebello

After his recovery from his war injuries, Mel tried to do the work Leon had been doing, but that did not work out. He got a job driving a delivery truck for an appliance manufacturer. He worked for the same company but it changed several times. One day David had been along the beach in Southern California and told him there was a small trailer park across the road from the beach in San Clemente. He told him he should get a small trailer and park it there. That is what he did and we enjoyed visiting them there. They later bought a double wide mobile home with a view of the ocean. After they retired, they moved from Montebello to the trailer park in San Clemente.

Melvin passed away peacefully in his sleep on May 2, 2016.

Harvey Burgess – Disabled War of 1812 Veteran

What an unexpected surprise to learn that Harvey Burgess, father of Lurania Powers Burgess Eggleston, not only served in the War of 1812, but was injured and left somewhat disabled for the rest of his life.

I recently joined the Daughters of the American Revolution, using Seth Burgess as my Patriot ancestor. His service in the Revolution was documented in the Joseph Eggleston book. In the process of documenting family relationships and birth and death places, the DAR registrar found in the newly digitized War of 1812 Pension Files this new information.

Harvey Burgess, the son of Seth Burgess, was living in Sempronius, New York at the time of the War of 1812. He apparently enlisted with some other men from Sempronius, including his brother-in-law Stephen Carroll. He served from August to October 1812.

Harvey Pension 1

Harvey began the process of applying for a pension for his service in 1851 when he was 72 years old. At that time he appeared before a Justice of the Peace in Macomb County, Michigan where he was then living and made the following deposition:

State of Michigan
County of Macomb
On this 21st day of May 1851 personally came before me a Justice of the Peace, for said County, Harvey Burgess aged seventy two, a resident of Shelby in said County, who being duly sworn, declares, that he is the identical Harvey Burgess, who was a soldier in the Company Commanded by Captain Martin Barber in the Regiment of New York Militia Commanded by col. Henry Bloom in the War with Great Britain, declared by the United States on the 18th day of June 1812, that on or about the 1st day of August 1812 aforesaid, he was called into the service of the United States for the term of three months, and that while in said service, on or about the last days of September 1812 aforesaid, that he was detached for what was called Boat duty, in removing the boats of the United States from Schluper in the State of New York to Black Rock in said State, while thus employed he received a severe injury on his right leg that prevents him from performing further duty and that said injury or disability has continued to ca.. and at times renders him wholey unable to labor for his support. And he further says that the reason why he has not heretofore made application for a pension was a desire on his part to live without calling on the Government for assistance, that as he advances in years, the injury or disability became more disturbing and painful, and renders him less able to labor for his support, consequently he makes this application for a pension which he feels entitled to receive from his country, from the fact that he cannot now do but little towards his support by reason of said disability. And he further declares that the Officers above mentioned, are dead, but that Joseph B. Miller, whose affidavit is herewith amended, was a soldier in the same company, as also a Stephen Carroll, who was present when deponent was injured, and the deponent received no regular discharge.
Harvey Burgess

Stephen Carroll, the husband of Harvey’s sister Olive, who was still living in Cayuga County, New York made a statement in Harvey’s behalf:

State of New York
County of Cayuga
On this twenty first day of April in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and fifty one personally came before me a Justice of the Peace in and for said county Stephen Carroll, who being duly sworn says that he is well acquainted with Harvey Burgess, a resident of the township of Shelby in the County of Macomb in the State of Michigan, that he was in the service of the United States on the 18th day of June AD 1812 with said Burgess, and that on or about the last day of September 1812 deponent and said Burgess were employed in the said service, in removing the Government boats from Schulpler to Black Rock in said state, and while thus engaged and in the discharge of their respective duties, the said Burgess received an injury on his right leg that prevents him from performing any further duty, and that said injury continued until they were discharged from service and that he has good reason to believe and does believe that said injury or disability still continues.
Stephen Carroll

A Doctor Taylor examined Harvey at that time and made a statement:

State of Michigan
County of Macomb
On this 21st day of May 1851 Personally appeared before me a Justice of the Peace for said County, Dr. Henry Taylor who being duly sworn according to law, says that he is a practicing physician and surgeon in Mount Clemens in said county, and that he has examined the injury or disability of Harvey Burgess of Shelby, whose application for a pension has been read to me and finds said disability to be a carposity of the tibia involving the flexor muscles of the foot, disabling the ancle joint to some extent, and that the degree of disability is three fourths.
H Taylor

This form apparently was filled out by Dr. Taylor:

It is hereby certified that Harvey Burgess in the company of Martin Barber in the Regiment of the United States Militia Commanded by Col. Henry Bloom is rendered incapable of performing the duty of a soldier, by reason of wounds or other injuries infliced while he was actually in the service aforesaid, and in the line of his duty, viz:
By satisfactory evidence and accurate examination, it appears that on the 25th day of September in the year 1812 being engaged as corporal of a guard at or near a place called Black Rock in the State of New York . . he received
wound in his leg by the location of which upon the spine of the tibia exposes it to injury and has now the character of a fever sore, the bone, no doubt being involved in the difficulties. The place has two openings which frequently discharge profusely, the length of time which it has existed renders it the leg wholly unfit for use.. . and he is thereby not only incapacitated for military duty, but, in the opinion of the undersigned is totally disabled from obtaining his subsistence from manual labor.

The 1850 Census is the only one with an occupation listed for Harvey Burgess. He was living then in Shelby, Macomb County, Michigan next door to his son Zadock. Other sons Stephen, age 21 and Charles age 27 with his wife and child lived with Harvey and Mary. His occupation is listed as “cooper” the same as Zadock. They were likely in business together, but because of his injuries and age Harvey was probably limited in the actual work that he did. Charles and Stephen were listed as farmers and probably helped to support their parents.

Years went by without Harvey receiving a pension and then he passed away in in January 1859. After his death, his son-in-law Lorin Johnson made this inquiry about the pension:

Harvey Pension 2Harvey Pension 3

Hon Sect of Interior
I wis to make the following inquiry
Harvey Burgess a soldier of 1812 while living in McComb Co Michigan applied for pension in the year 1854. He told a daughter that he would get his money in March but in January 20th he died.
Col. Stocton of Mount Clemmens McComb co Made out the papers for him after his death.
The col Stockton was told by a grand daughter that the papers were all ready and sent to Washington and that is the last was heard of it.
Was there a pension granted, that it paid and to whome and by what authority. If not paid, what steps are necessary to get it there are several Heirs they wife being one of them.
Pleas give me the information sought and obliege.
Respect yours
L. G. Johnson

In spite of his service to his country and the lifelong disability he was left with, he never did receive a pension.