The Family Bible of Orson Hyde Eggleston

Family Bibles are wonderful sources of information. I found this Bible when I visited Cousin Ruth several years ago. She indicated that it had belonged to Orson Hyde Eggleston and had been given to her father Theron Eggleston, probably by his father Orson. It appears that it may have been in the possession of Joseph S. Eggleston at some point and he may have entered at least some of this information himself. Ruth let me take this Bible to make photocopies of the Family Record entries.

These pages lists births, beginning with Samuel Eggleston, Orson’s father:

Samuel Eggleston, son of Samuel and Elizabeth Hill Eggleston was born March 30th 1804 in the town of Marcellus Onondago State of New York

Lurania Powers Burgess ^Eggleston was born August 15th 1808 in the town of Sempronius Cayuga County State of New York

Dwight Eggleston son of Samuel and Lurania Eggleston was Born August 9 1828 in town of Se,[rpmois Co of Cayauga State of NY

Benjamin Born was Born April 6th 1830 in Sempronius Cayuga Co NY

Reuben Birgess Eggleston Born July 24th 1831 in Sempronius Cayuga Co NY

Edwin Eggleston Born Oct 25 1833 in town of Sempronius NY

Harvey B Eggleston Born Feb 8th 1836 in Sempronius County of Cayuga State of N York

Orson Hyde Eggleston Born Oct 3rd 1841 in Niles Cayuga Co NY

Samuel Eggleston Jr Born Jan 16th 1847 at winter quarters Omahaw Nation Nebraska. Died in same place Aug 23rd 1847

Mary E Eggleston Born Sept 22nd 1849 at Traders Point Pottawattamie County Iowa

David Orson Eggleston Born June 15th 1883 in Eden Weber Co Utah. Blest Aug 2nd 1883 in Eden by Armstead Moffatt. Died Nov 3rd 1884 in Eden.

Joseph Smith Eggleston Born July 5th 1885 in Eden Weber Co Utah. Blest Set 3rd 1885 by Henry J Fuller in Eden. Baptized in Afton Unitah Co Wyo July 5th 1893 by Barnard Parry. Confirmed by C. D. Cazier.

Mattie May Eggleston Born July 30th 1887 in Afton Unitah Co Wyo. Blest Nov 1st 1888 by O H Eggleston in Afton. Baptized July 30th 1895 by Clarance C Gardner in Afton. Confirmed Aug 1st 1895 by Clarance Gardner in Afton.

The births of this generation are only the children of Orson Hyde Eggleston and Annie Christine Johnson. Children of his other wives are not included.

 

Ordination information for Joseph S. Eggleston. These entries may have been added by Joseph – or all of the information may have been written by Joseph.

Joseph S. Eggleston ordained a deacon by Byron H. Allred Oct 1st 1900

Joseph S. Eggleston ordained a teacher Nov 2nd 1901 by Bishop Osborne Law

Joseph S. Eggleston ordained a priest Feb 28th 1903 by Elder Charles C. Leavitt

MARRIAGES

Samuel Eggleston son of Samuel and Elizabeth Eggleston was Born in the Town of Marcellus Onondaga County State of New York on the 30th day of March 1804

Lurania P Eggleston Daughter of Harvey and Polly Burgess was Born August 15th 1808 in the Town of Sempronius County of Cayuga State of New York

Samuel and Lurania was Married August 23rd 1827 in the town of Sempronius Cayuga County State of New York

Mary E Mountford was Born May 14th 1854 in Burstown Staffordshire England. Samuel and Elizabeth was married Oct 24th 1870 at Salt Lake City Utah

Catherine Kat was Born was Born April 5th 1836. Samuel and Catherine was married the 6th day of March 1871 in Salt Lake City Utah by Daniel H Wells

 

DEATHS

Dwight Eggleston died in Springwater Livingston Co NY Aug 2nd 1829

Benjamin Eggleston Died April 27 1830

These next are births of Orson and Annie Christine’s other children:

Florence Eggleston Born May 10th 1893 in Afton Unitah Co Wyoming. Blest July 6th by C D Cazier in Afton. Married to Norman D Moffatt June 3/13. Baptized May 10th 1901 by O H Eggleston. Confirmed same day by Edward Davis.

Theron Johnson son of Orson Hyde Eggleston and Annie Christine Johnson Born June 12th 1905. Blessed June 20th 1905 by O H Eggleston in Afton Unitah Co Wyoming. Baptized June 12th 1913 by O H Eggleston at Afton Wyo. Confirmed July 6th 1913 by Osborne Law.

Anna Christine Eggleston daughter of Peter Johnson and Anne Mariah Mattson Christensen and wife of Orson H. Eggleston. Born in Salt Lake City Utah November 7th 1864. Died at Afton Wyoming August 13th 1909 aged 44 years 11 months 6 days.

 

Times and Seasons Journal of Samuel Eggleston

Finding the Treasure of an Old Book

Sometimes a old book is more than just an old book – it is a tangible trace of someone’s life – a treasure worth much more than the value of the volume.

At one point in my genealogy journey, I made contact with a second cousin named Ruth. She was the daughter of my father’s Uncle Theron Eggleston. Somehow, Theron had assumed the role of family genealogist in his time – I can relate to that. He apparently had been given his father Orson Hyde Eggleston’s records. Theron also lived in Salt Lake City near the Utah Genealogical Society and he and his wife Emily spent much time there researching during the early to mid-1900’s.

I made a visit to Ruth’s home in West Valley City, Utah and found there a genealogical gold mine. Her basement was filled with boxes and file cabinets full of records. This was before I had a cell phone which could take pictures, so we filled a box with selected documents which she let me take to make photocopies.

Journal entries of Samuel Eggleston in Times & Seasons

Times & Seasons

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ruth also showed me two books that day. One was the family bible kept by Great grandfather Orson H. Eggleston with records in it. The other she casually handed me saying “This book has some stuff written in the front.” I was impressed first because this was a bound volume of The Times and Seasons. This was a newspaper which had been printed in Nauvoo, Illinois. Papers from 1842 and 1843 were bound in this Volume IV, which he owned. The publication date is identified by Roman Numerals MDCCCXLIII, which would be 1843. I was more impressed by what Samuel had written in it.

Samuel’s Journal

On the front blank pages in the book, Samuel had made some journal entries. The initial entry appears to be only “Ogden City S. E.” probably written to identify the book as his. Some additional entries followed: “Ogden City Dec 30/66, Ogden City Dec 29/72, Ogden City July 16/75 S. E., Ogden City Jan 23/78 S. E. , Ogden City Jan 12/79.” It is interesting that he made successive entries apparently still with only the place, date, and his initials. From this we can assume that he possessed the book as early as 1866 and possibly earlier.

The first entry with any additional information was dated March 7/79 and stated only “Stayed at home on account of bad cold.” The next, Dec 3, 1879 Wednesday, was also very newsy “Rained all last night it had been raining all day now ½ past 3 S. E.” Christmas Day 1879, Samuel must have picked up this book as he spent a lonely day home alone. He wrote: “Ogden Dec 25 all day at home alone wife away taking care of the sick been away all day”.

An entry dated June 27, 1880 is historically significant: “36 years ago today Joseph & Hyrum were killed by a mob in Carthage Illinois attended meeting in the Tabernacle heard C. W. Penrose. ”

Documenting his Last Years

The next entries involved events he participated in.“August 28, 1880 This day attended the High Priest quorum had a first rate time Bro Moffett Presiding.” “January 15th 1881 this day I attended a funeral at Bro. Robert Wilsons son in law of Thos . Emmett in Ogden City Utah on the death of his Infant Daughter.”

The next gave a very brief account of a rather significant occasion: “Ogden City Jun 22nd 1881 at Farr’s grove at the old folks excursion Bishop [ Newton ] Birth day 88 years old S. E.” Farr’s grove was a large Orchard owned by the Farr family. Samuel’s son-in-law Enoch Farr owned part of this land. This “grove” was used as a park or gathering place. Later part of it became what is now “Lorin Farr Park”. “Old Folks Day” celebrations began in 1875 in Salt Lake City. In June 1881, Ogden was host of the “Old Folks Day” Celebration. For this event, 650 people from Salt Lake and Davis Counties joined the Weber County old folks at Lorin Farr’s grove, being conveyed from the Depot in 285 wagons. President John Taylor, George Q. Cannon, and Wilford Woodruff were in attendance along with prominent citizens of Weber County.

Samuel’s journal entries also indicated that he enjoyed remarkably good health even as he became rather old. January 5th 1883, he wrote: “in the morning with wife feeling well attended fast meeting yesterday at 10 o’clock also the Relief Society at 2 PM enjoyed my self first rate never felt better in my life S. E.”

The first indication of any health problems was February 28th 1883. He wrote “it is a very pleasant day so warm that the flies are about my health is very good except I am quite lame and have been for some weeks past I first fell and hurt my left hip that was bad about 2 weeks then there was a sore come on my right foot that has been bad for about 2 weeks but is getting better I feel well in body and mind if I live till the 30th day of next month I shall be 79 years old but I feel well as ever I did.” So in spite of some health problems, he still felt very blessed by good health.

An entry August 7th [1883] showed Samuel’s continuing interest in politics, though he didn’t mention whether he was on the ticket for this election. He wrote: “clear and pleasant yesterday was Election all voted the Peoples ticket no opposition my health is very good I enjoy my self first rate. Samuel Eggleston” This was the only notation with his complete signature. The signature is very similar to the one on probate records of his father Samuel in Springwater, New York.

It appears that Samuel’s health began to decline during the last months of his life. The last notation in this book was dated Ogden December 19th 1883, and stated: “my health has been very poor for the last 2 weeks have had a pain in my left side the most of the time I have been free from Pain for 2 days past but I am not very [stout]” There was nothing more written after this. Samuel died May 26, 1884.

Returning the Book

Along with the box of papers, Ruth let me take these two books that day to photocopy the inscriptions. I must admit that I was seriously tempted to keep this book. But I did return it. A few years after that Ruth passed away. I have no idea who currently has possession of this book, but I hope that they appreciate the treasure that it is and take good care of it. It is so much more than just a rare old book – it is a small window into the life of our ancestor.

Note: Text for this post has been taken from my book The Joseph Eggleston Family: Seven Generations from Joseph (d.1767) of Stonington, Connecticut to Joseph (1885-1965) of Utah and Wyoming (Including Maternal Lines: Hill, Burgess, Titus, Sammis & Johnson) pp. 391-392.

THE MEANING OF STUFF

I am feeling somewhat burdened by stuff. Having lived in the same house for 36 years where my husband and I raised three children who have since moved out, I fully realize that we have accumulated a lot of stuff – way too much stuff. I and my siblings have also been encouraging our 90-year-old father to get rid of some of the stuff he has acquired during his long lifetime and stored over 50 years in the same house. My father grew up during the depression and has a deeply instilled sense that things should be kept in case there is a future shortage or they may again be useful to someone. He is now willing to give away things to family members, but there are definite differences between what he thinks might be useful and what they might really want. My children are of a generation which seems to be able to easily dispose of stuff. If they find later that they need something they got rid of, they just buy another. I personally am somewhere in between – I really want to rid myself of unnecessary stuff cluttering my home and life, but I also see value and meaning in some things, which makes it harder to let go.

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I have read advice columns suggesting strategies for eliminating stuff. One criteria given is usefulness. If something has not been used for a period of time, you should get rid of it. Another strategy uses a criteria of joy – encouraging people to acquire and/or keep objects which bring them pleasure and discard those that don’t. The challenge that keeps me immobile is the realization that some stuff is just stuff, useful, enjoyable or otherwise, but other stuff has meaning. Getting rid of meaningless stuff that is no longer useful or enjoyed is not really a problem (other than the time and effort involved in disposal). The problem is that for me, many objects have meaning. I have kept them because of what they mean to me, even when they take up space or are not useful. Continue reading

The Family Archivist

We are the chosen. In each family there is one who seems called to find the ancestors, to share the family story, to safeguard the family treasures. We are the storytellers of the tribe. We are the keepers of the records. We are the family archivists.

As I got into serious research on the Eggleston family, I became aware of a wonderful book: Bygod Eggleston, Englishman & Colonist and Some of His Descendants, by Dr. Rosalie Eggleston & Linda Eggleston McBroom and published through the Mary & John Clearing House.

Bygod book

These two genealogists had done a tremendous amount of research on our immigrant ancestor. Theirs was a collaboration across the ocean: Rosalie lived in England and Linda in the U. S. Together they were able to put together a great early history of the family. Sometime later, additional research resulted in an article in The American Genealogist on the mother of Bygod Eggleston. Their research and documentation cleared up some errors which had been around for a long time. Continue reading

Prepare a Book of Remembrance

“Prepare a Book of Remembrance” – This was never an item to be checked off a to-do list, but rather the creation of a dynamic entity, ever expanding with new discoveries and evolving in format through technological advances.

“Prepare a Book of Remembrance” was counsel I was given as a young woman. My Book of Remembrance was actually already begun, but I had no grasp of its significance.

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I grew up being familiar with a “Book of Remembrance”, an expandable legal size binder full of pedigree charts and family group sheets, which my parents kept. This was kind of a requirement for faithful members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.The earliest beginnings of my own Book of Remembrance was when my father gathered us kids at the kitchen table, showed us his Book of Remembrance and gave us blank charts to hand copy information on to. I also remember him telling us stories about the people whose names we wrote and showing us a few old photographs. I remember at least one time going to the local Family History Library with him and looking at microfilm. It was exciting to see our family name projected onto the screen, but it was all still rather abstract. Continue reading