Vedia’s Postcard Book

One Saturday afternoon in January 2011, after having lunch in downtown Ogden with my daughters, I and my youngest decided to go across the street to our favorite Antique Store (which was new then but sadly is not there anymore) before heading home. We were wandering around different areas when I heard her calling to me from upstairs, saying something about Egglestons. I hurried to her to see what she was talking about. She had picked up an old Postcard Book filled with postcards with the names of Egglestons and asked if these were our family. I did recognize many of the names and started getting really excited. This store sold things on consignment and this album was priced rather high, intended to be sold intact. There were other old postcards being sold individually and I guess they thought that this was worth the cost of all of the individual cards. Anyway, it was more than I was ready to pay for it. I did talk to the store owner and left my name and a message for the owner of this album.

album-cover

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Doc’s Memories of Alice

babyAlice

Alice was born on Mormon Row and was still a child when they moved to Eden. She went to school in Eden and Huntsville and graduated from Weber High School in Ogden. She was a good student and made many lasting friends. As a young lady she babysat for several families. Because our mother was not in good health after I was born Alice did a lot of raising me and we were very close. A friend of hers moved to California and invited her to come down there and be a nanny for a family. She thought that would be interesting, so she went to California. While there she enjoyed many things including dancing. Continue reading

Doc’s Memories of Orland

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Orland was born on Mormon Row, but the family moved to Eden that same year. Orland went to school at Eden Elementary, Huntsville Junior High and Weber High School like his siblings and he was the first to go on to College. Weber was a two year College at that time so he got an associate degree. Orland was a good worker and was closer to Dad than the rest of us. Continue reading

Doc’s Memories of Wesley

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Wesley cowboy

Wesley was born on Mormon Row and came with the Family to Eden in 1919. Being the first son, he worked from childhood on the farm. He went to  school at Eden Elementary, Huntsville Junior High and Weber High School. He did not get any more education except as a mechanic on the Southern Pacific Railroad. During the depression, jobs were not very available. His first real job affected his life forever. He got a job with the WPA or the PWA. The area of Snow Basin was being developed. A shorter route to the Basin would be up Wheeler Canyon. Wheeler Canyon is the Canyon just south of the Pine View Dam (the Dam not the lake). As you start up the canyon there is an outcropping of rock that almost blocks the canyon. They decided that outcropping should be removed. No one of the group really knew any thing about dynamite and fuses. They proceeded drilling holes straight into the rock and putting charges in the holes and tamping gravel in to hold the charges. The timing of fuses is determined by putting a thread in with the powder to control the speed of the fuse. If the thread gets broken then you have a hot fuse. After they got the holes drilled and the charges in the told Wesley and Wesley Wilson to go down and warn the workers below that the charge would go off in five minutes. The Wesleys left and they set the fuses off. When the Wesleys were about 100 feet down the trail the charge went off. The gravel in the holes came out like a gunshot. Wesley Wilson dropped to the ground, a few rocks hit him in the back and neck killing him. My brother reached down to check him only to find that his hand had been shredded. The skin peeled off his hand and the fingers broken. I remember seeing that hand. They put a wire out around it to hold the fingers straight. He did get limited use of that hand. He was able to get a job at the Union Pacific Rail Road Round House on 29th street. Continue reading

Mormon Row Homestead

I first became aware of the existence of Mormon Row in 1996. I had done genealogy research for some time and knew that Grandpa and Grandma Eggleston’s first four children were born in Grovont, Wyoming. I had no idea where Grovont was – I don’t think it is on any current maps – just somewhere in the Jackson Hole area. In 1996, my Dad was invited to a Mormon Row Centennial Celebration for descendants of the original homesteaders. The first homestead was granted in 1896. Eventually there were 21 homesteads there.

1918 Mormon Row Map

1918 Map of Mormon Row – Joe Eggleston homestead in the center

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Doc’s Memories of Dad and Mom

Dad was born in Eden, but because his Father had three wives, to avoid problems, he moved to Grover in Star Valley Wyoming where Dad was raised. Besides farming Dad got several other jobs. One was taking the mail from Idaho over Teton Pass into Jackson. He also worked on the Hoback road into Jackson. There were several people Homesteading and creating a road that became Mormon Row. It was over a ridge by Moose Junction. In 1896 the Government granted homesteads on that road. I have Dad’s Homestead deed signed by President Wilson. Dad’s Uncle Jacob Johnson Homesteaded next door to him. His uncle’s twin brother Ephraim built a saw mill in Wilson Wyoming and provided lumber for them to build. Dad started to build before he got the Homestead papers. He built a barn and started a house. Mother’s family had settled in South Park in Jackson Hole and Dad and Mother got together there. They went either by buggy or horse back to get married in the Salt Lake Temple. That was quite a trip.

Wedding

Wedding Photo of Joseph and Cuma Eggleston

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