2001 An Eggleston Genealogy Odyssey – Part 2 to Nauvoo, Illinois

On to Nauvoo, Illinois

The 2001 Eggleston Genealogy Odyssey continued after our visit to Winter Quarters and Council Bluffs, Iowa. After spending the night at a campground called “Sleepy Hollow”, Dad and I started early Monday August 5, and drove a few hours south from Iowa City. We crossed the Mississippi River on a Bridge by Fort Madison and drove into Nauvoo, Illinois from the east. What we saw was a small town on the bluff with some shops and houses and then right in front of us was the Nauvoo Temple under construction.

Nauvoo LDS Temple in 2001

Nauvoo Temple under construction in 2001

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Land Office

One of our first stops was the land office where we looked up where our ancestors had lived. We spent more time there than I expected and got quite a lot of information.

Historic Nauvoo Map

The Eggleston home on Block 62 and the Garlick home on Block 34. The Temple Block is the larger dark square in the Wells area

The Garlick home would have been a few blocks further beyond the trees in the photo below where it goes down into a gully. The Cheney family lived outside of town.

The Eggleston home

Scaffolding on the Temple in the middle of this shot from the area of the Eggleston home.

Looking toward where the land slopes down to a gully.

 

We found the lot where the Samuel Eggleston family lived (approximately). The Eggleston home in Nauvoo was located on Lot 1 of Block 62 on the corner of Hibbard and Woodruff Streets, only a few blocks north of the Temple site. Where this lot now sits, the street dead ends and there is a group of trees.

In August 2001, we could easily see the scaffolding on the tower of the Temple, then under reconstruction, from the Eggleston land. Depending on how many large trees were between them and the temple, Samuel and Lurania could have had a good view of the Temple being built. They may have been able to hear the sounds of construction from their home. Certainly it was a very short walk for Samuel to go there to help with the building. Their lot would have been large enough for a garden, but Samuel did not have sufficient land to farm in or outside of the city.

Shoemaker Shop

We went to main street and started with the Boot and Shoe Shop. One of the missionaries there mentioned that he was from Castle Dale, Utah and Dad had to ask if he knew about Wilsonville. He said his brother owns it. We had a nice discussion about Wilsonville. At another place there was a missionary who knew Mormon Row and had stayed at the Moulton’s place and looked at Grandpa’s collapsed cabin. It is a small world.

My Dad talking to the docent in front of the Shoe Shop

The shoemaking demonstration was very interesting. I kept thinking about Samuel. He was a shoemaker so the things we saw demonstrated would have been his daily work. At that time, shoemaking was quite an involved process. Besides the tanning of the leather, it included woodworking in making wooden shoe lasts and small wooden pegs with which to fasten on the soles, as well as the cutting and sewing of the leather pieces into shoes.

There were about six shoemaker shops in Nauvoo. Six shoemakers worked in this particular shop. It is likely that Samuel worked worked in such a shop with others, rather than having one of his own, though he could have worked out of his home.

In 1845 the “Tanners and Shoemakers Association” was formed in Nauvoo. It later expanded to include harnessmakers. They operated a tannery on Hibbard and Rich Streets near Colton’s brick yard, and a Boot, Shoe, Saddle and Harness Shop on Mulholland Street. The Association advertised in April 1845 for business as well as for calf-skins. Samuel very likely was a member of this Association and may have worked in the tannery or Boot and Shoe Shop.

Around Town

 

The Browning home and Gun Shop

We went to the Browning House and gun shop. It was interesting because we know the Browning family. They settled in Ogden, Utah. We learned some family history as well as information about the making of guns. I am pretty dumb about guns, so it was a learning experience for me. We also ran in to people we knew from home there. Small world again.

We visited the brick yard where we saw the process of making bricks. The Log School, the Tin Shop and the Bakery were interesting places we stopped. The Lyon Drug store was quite a large store with not only drugs but other typical articles that would have been in a general store. Our ancestors probably shopped there. An herb garden was outside which would have supplied many of the “drugs” in the store. The Lyons who owned this store were in-laws of Patty Sessions, the midwife who delivered Samuel Jr. in Winter Quarters. The log cabin next to the store was her home.

I must mention that it was very hot and humid. It was quite miserable being outside there. I thought it very interesting that these “restored” and reconstructed building which we were told had been build as the originals with the kinds of tools they had then and furnished with period furnishings, etc., all had AIR CONDITIONING. It was heaven to go inside. I was so glad they didn’t want to be so authentic as to make us tourists sweat.

Post office and Printing Office

The Post Office was of interest to me because we seem to have a history of Postal Work in our family. My grandfather Joseph Eggleston carried mail in Jackson Hole and had the Post Office in his home on Mormon Row. Selar Cheney had the Post Office in South Park named after him. Orson Hyde Eggleston was the Postmaster in Eden, Utah, and Samuel Eggleston was Deputy Postmaster in Pottawatamie County, Iowa. Sylvester Wilson had a Post Office at Wilsonville, Utah along the Old Spanish Trail.

The Printing Office and the Post Office behind the wagon

At the Post office they had the pigeonhole cabinet where letters were. They showed how they wrote both ways and folded the page into an envelop to conserve valuable paper. Postage was based on how far it was sent and it was usually sent postage due. It was expensive for the time so they were conservative.

The Printing Office showed the cases of type and how type was set then the page printed. It was interesting to think of Reuben and Orson Eggleston working in such a place, doing the tedious work of setting type.

 

Seventies Hall

 Nauvoo Seventies Hall

Seventies Hall

After walking through town we drove over to the Seventies Hall. It was quite an impressive building and we learned about it’s construction as well as about the purpose of it—to train missionaries. Upstairs were displays of artifacts that had been found as the restoration projects were done – lots of broken pottery and bottles. They told us that there had been a root cellar at Brigham Young’s home, which was basically a garbage dump after they built a new one attached to the house. Some of the broken dishes found were later glued together and now are displayed at his home.

We were able to look up ancestors who were seventies in the indexes and found some information about them. Most of this information was also at the Land and Records Office.

Samuel Eggleston, who was a Member of the Ninth Quorum of the Seventy. In the fall of 1844 several new Quorums of the Seventy were organized. The Ninth Quorum of Seventy was organized October 8, 1844. Samuel was ordained in October 1844, which was probably at the time this Quorum was organized. He is toward the beginning of the list of members. The Ninth Quorum recorded its first meeting October 16, 1844 in the Seventies Hall. Meeting notes included mention in most meetings of the members “speaking their feelings”.

Blacksmith Shop

Next to the Seventies Hall was the Blacksmith and Wheelwright Shop. We learned how a wagon and especially the wheels were made. When the Saints were preparing to leave Nauvoo, this was a major business and they had to work very quickly. At the Blacksmith shop the missionary actually made a small horseshoe while we watched and he talked. The term “smith’ refers to the smiting of metal. The term blacksmith apparently came from the process of dunking the shaped metal into horse manure or today oil is used, which turns it black.

I couldn’t help but try to imagine the Garlick family living in an abandoned blacksmith shop their first winter in Nauvoo.

Memorial Gazebo

Samuel Eggleston in the middle column

From there we went down to the river. There were water lillies floating on the water which were just beautiful. It really was a lovely and peaceful place. There is a Gazebo there with the names of people who died on the way west. Samuel Eggleston Jr. is listed there, as he died in Winter Quarters.

 

Other Visits and Activities

Though family history was one purpose of our trip, we were also very interested in L. D. S. Church History. So we of course saw all that there was to see and did all that we could fit in during our short trip. We went through homes of Brigham Young and some of the other Church leaders. We spent some time at the Red Brick store where the Relief Society was organized. A collection of artifacts which had been found in the city was on display there. We then went to the Mansion House and the Homestead where Joseph Smith and his family had lived.

The Missionaries presented a musical about the old days of Nauvoo in the Cultural Hall, which was very entertaining. Later in the evening we enjoyed the “Sunset on the Mississippi” program. There was a actually a very beautiful sunset, but it came with bugs. This really is a beautiful place and must have been so sad for our ancestors to have to leave their homes here.

We spent the night in the Nauvoo State Park Campground. In the morning we drove out to the Old Nauvoo Burial Ground. It is very peaceful out there and we were alone except for one small group who joined us for part of the time. Very few of the graves are identified, and many of the existing stones are broken, but there is a Gazebo with all the names. David Garlick died in Nauvoo and his name is on the monument. We were surprised that this cemetery was out of town as far as it was. They would have had lengthy funeral processions.

We then drove to Carthage to visit the Jail and Visitor’s Center there, before heading further east.

Trijntjie Catherine Kat Eggleston

Catherine Kat Eggleston has always been somewhat of a mystery to me. It was only recently that I found, through what others have posted to FamilySearch, that her full name was Trijntjie Catherine Kat Eggleston. I found other bits of very intersting information there. She is still somewhat of a mystery, but now a much more intriguing and fascinating mystery.

The Family Bible Record

The first I knew of Catherine was from Orson Hyde Eggleston’s Family Bible. The record there lists 3 wives for Orson’s father Samuel Eggleston. His first wife, and the mother of his children, was Lurania Powers Burgess. The record lists 2 other marriages which both occurred shortly after Lurania’s death in July 1870.

Samuel married Mary Elizabeth Mumford October 24, 1870. She is a total mystery. I have found no other information about her and she seems to have disappeared from Samuel’s life very shortly after this marriage.

Samuel was married to Catherine Kat March 6, 1871 in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City by Daniel H. Wells. Catherine was born April 5th, 1836, making her 35 years old at the time. Samuel was 67.

Other Bits and Pieces

I learned that Catherine was born in Holland on April 5,1836. I assumed that she was a recent immigrant who had come to Utah as a single woman. In the 1880 Census she was 45 years old and living in Ogden, Utah with Samuel, who was 76.

Samuel and Katherine Eggleston in Ogden 2nd Ward Record

I learned her parents names early on in my research. The Ogden 2nd Ward Records list Samuel and Katherine as members. Katherine was baptized April 8, 1868.  (Another record has the date 29 June 1868 in Zaandam, Lammers, Netherlands) The record gave her parents names as Peter Kats and Elizabeth Blue. I also found that she had done Tempe work for them in the Logan Temple.

Learning from Catherine’s Death

I learned much more about Catherine from finding records of her death. Catherine Kat Eggleston died September 8, 1888. The Ogden Standard published the following on September 12, 1888:

Card of Thanks. EDITOR THE STANDARD: With your permission the undersigned would like to express their heartfelt thanks to the many friends of the late Catherine Eggleston for their kindness and assistance during her short and severe illness, and also especially thank the Second Ward choir for their beautiful singing during the funeral services. The kindness shown to her before and after her death will never be forgotten. R. B. EGGLESTON, MRS. MARY E. FARR

Reuben worked for the newspaper, so it is not surprising that he had this printed. It does seem to indicate that Samuel’s children had good feelings toward Catherine. Orson also included in a letter to his father from his Mission, “my respects to Catherine and all the rest.”

According to the terms of his Will, Samuel had left Katherine all of his personal property, with his land to go to his children Reuben, Orson and Mary, after Catherine’s death. Samuel wished to “provide for the support and maintenance of my beloved wife Katherine Eggleston as long as she may live, and in a suitable manner as the condition of my estate will provide.” She was allowed to occupy and control his real estate, including benefiting from rents and profits. She may have rented out rooms in the house.

Upon Catherine’s death, Thomas Doxey and Warren G. Child were made administrators of her estate. A Notice to Creditors was published in the newspaper in November and December 1888, by Thomas Doxey. The personal property was inventoried and sold at auction. Her estate was settled in the Probate Court of Weber County April 21, 1890. Final distribution to heirs-at-law was set for Saturday the 17th day of May, 1890.

Catherine’s Family

I learned the names of Catherine’s siblings from her probate record. Heirs listed in the probate record included brothers John [Jan] Kat of Velzen, Holland; Herman [Hermanus] Kat of Wormeveer, Holland; Henrika Kat Koelevaart, wife of John Koelevaart; and children of her deceased sister Angie Kat de Ruyter, including Semelia Jacoba, Elizbeth and Anna Catharine de Ruyter, all of Amsterdam, Holland. These heirs conveyed their rights and interest in the estate to Ida Zitzman, a widowed immigrant from Holland, who lived in Katherine’s ward with her six children.

Catherine’s Final Resting Place?

The Ogden City Cemetery Records show Lurania buried in Lot B-2-30 1E; Samuel in B 2-30 2E; and “Adult Mound” B 2-30-3E. There is nothing in the record to indicate who was buried in this third plot. Orson Eggleston bought a 10 plot Lot in the Cemetery, probably at the time his mother or first child died. It appears that they were not all used, and the rest later sold to others, as Orson moved to Afton, Wyoming and his family were buried elsewhere. It is likely that Catherine was buried next to Samuel in this other plot. Catherine had no children, so Samuel’s family may have buried her there, but never placed a marker. We may never know for sure, who is in this “Adult Mound”, but there have been no other records found to indicate that Catherine was buried anywhere else.

Recent Discoveries

This was all I knew of Catherine for some time, and I thought this was all I might ever know. But we now live in a digital age with many more people interested in genealogy. I recently found on FamilySearch, not only Catherine’s full name, but also her entire family and hints of her previous life in Holland.

Catherine was born Trintjie Catherine Kat, the daughter of Pieter Kat and Lijsbet Blaauw (The Dutch spellings of Peter Kat and Elizabeth Blue). Catherine married Peter Fontijin on November 3, 1861 in Zaandam, Netherlands. Peter had previously been married Geertjie Muntjewerff, who died July 7, 1861. They had six children, though one died as in infant and 3 others died in January 1862. So Catherine at 25 years of age, became instant Step-mother to five very young children and then buried 3 of them just months later.

Peter and Catherine were baptized members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in April 1868. Peter, along with other members of his family, was excommunicated shortly after being baptized.

It would seem that Catherine and Peter divorced at some point, though I haven’t found a record of a divorce. It could have happened before Catherine came to America. Or possibly she came with the expectation that he would follow soon after and he changed his mind.

Catherine sailed for America August 25, 1869 on the ship Minnesota with Jantje, age 7 and Cornelia Fontijin, age 6, Peter’s surviving children from his first marriage. There were 443 Immigrating Saints on this ship. They arrived in New York September 6, 1969. They then traveled by train to Ogden, arriving there September 16, 1869. An obituary of Jantje – Jeanette F. Dartnell – indicated that this was the first passenger train to arrive in Ogden.

What Happened to Peter Fontijin

Peter married a third time to Henedricka von Elburg July 30, 1876 in Amsterdam. Peter was re-baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints June 17, 1876. Hendericka, who was then listed as a widow, was baptized on June 20, 1876, shortly before their marriage. Peter and his wife, known later as Harriet, came to Utah in 1877. They lived in Salt Lake City. Harriet was an ordained preacher of spiritualism, and apparently held seances. Peter died March 27, 1905 in Salt Lake City. It appears that even though he was re-baptized into the L. D. S. Church, he did not remain a faithful member, but joined his wife in spiritualism. Possibly his re-baptism was in part to be able to immigrate to America with L.D.S. Church immigration.

Questions

Catherine came to Utah with two young children. The ages given on the immigration record do not match with the birth records of the daughters of Peter and Geertjie. They should have been a little older – 10 and 12 years old, as indicated not only by their birth dates, but by the length of residence in Salt Lake City when they died. It is possible that preparations for immigration were begun years earlier and those ages for the children remained on the records. Catherine’s age of 36 at the time of immigration is also incorrect, though it is a few years older than she was.

I have not been able to find Catherine or these girls on the 1870 Census, so that early time in Utah is a mystery. Cornelia/Nellie was married in 1876 and Jantjie/Jeanette in 1882 in Salt Lake City.

Did Catherine care for these girls until her marriage to Samuel? Were they all living together after Catherine was married? We do not know for sure where Catherine was living before she married Samuel. It would seem more likely that they became acquainted in Ogden, rather than Salt Lake City.

If these girls were not with Catherine, as seems the case, then who were they with? Did Catherine bring the girls to live with someone else in Salt Lake City? They were too young to be on their own, so must have lived with someone for those first years. They could have joined their father when he immigrated in 1877.

Peter and his daughters all lived in Salt Lake City for the rest of their lives. Obituaries for Cornelia/Nellie Heystek’s says that she resided in Salt Lake City since she came to Utah. One says that she came to Utah with her sister at age 10. Jeanette’s death certificate indicates she lived in Salt Lake City for 77 years, which would date back to their 1869 immigration. Nellie’s says she was a resident for 61 years when she died in 1929.

These girls were very young when their father married Catherine, so she would have been the only mother they ever knew. Yet, they were not listed as heirs in Catherine’s probate record. Records of these girls show no connection at all to Catherine, as if she was just someone with the same surname who immigrated on the same ship or possibly someone hired to escort them to America. So though we have a little more history, Catherine remains somewhat of a mystery.

A Note on Name Spelling

I have seen her name spelled Catherine, Catherina, and Katherine on different records. The papers in Samuel Eggleston’s probate record have her name spelled Katherine. Samuel spelled it that way in his will. In the signature space on the probate papers however, it shows it was signed with X – her mark. So Catherine was likely illiterate herself and others spelled her name as they felt it should be.

The Life and Untimely Death of Harvey Burgess Eggleston

Little is known of the details of the life of Harvey Burgess Eggleston. He was just becoming an adult when his life was cut short. We can only imagine what his life would have been like if he had lived, and wonder about the circumstances of his death.

Birth of Harvey Burgess Eggleston

Harvey Burgess Eggleston, the 5th child of Samuel and Lurania Powers Burgess Eggleston, was born February 8, 1836, In Sempronius, Cayuga County, New York. He was named for his grandfather Harvey Burgess. His parents lost their first 2 sons as infants, so when Harvey was born he had two older brothers.

 

Family Bible birth of Harvey Burgess Eggleston

The birth date of Harvey Burgess Eggleston was recorded in the Eggleston Family Bible – bottom on the left

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2001 An Eggleston Genealogy Odyssey – Part 1 to Iowa

I learned a great deal about our family history during a 2001 road trip tracing our family’s migration route in reverse – An Eggleston Genealogy Odyssey.

The Eggleston Genealogy Odyssey Begins

Eggleston Genealogy transportation

This is the only photo I took of the motorhome on the trip. Skaneateles Lake is in the background

In August 2001, I invited myself on a journey with my Dad. Mom passed away in November 2000. She and Dad had traveled around much of the country in their motorhome. That summer, Dad wanted to drive to New Hampshire to visit my sister. It was a trip he had made several times with Mom, but I was concerned about him traveling that far by himself. (He later made many solitary trips – just not that far) I also was up for a visit with my sister. We learned that my other sister would be staying with them for a while in between moves, so it was a 2 for 1. After doing a good decade of genealogy research, I saw an opportunity to see some of the places our ancestors had lived. I eagerly offered to accompany Dad so he wouldn’t be lonely on this trip. Thus began a journey to a family reunion which traced our family’s migration route across the country – in reverse. A journey back to our beginnings, almost.

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The Very Brief Life of Samuel Eggleston IV

January 16th marks the anniversary of the birth of Samuel Eggleston, son of Samuel and Lurania Powers Burgess Eggleston. His birth, life and death occurred during a very dark time and place in the lives of his family and the larger community of Latter-day Saints. Early in 1846, the Saints were forced to leave their homes in Nauvoo, Illinois. The Eggleston family were not among the first to leave. They stayed until sometime in the spring of 1846 according to Samuel’s account. They may have stayed longer than others for financial reasons, or to help with the completion of the Temple which was dedicated May 1, 1846.

The Egglestons traveled to Winter Quarters in Nebraska, where the Saints had gathered to prepare to go further west. Small cabins were built where they spent a miserable winter. There was inadequate food for the many refugees camped there. There was also much disease which was easily spread. Many people died during that year, especially the very young and very old.

Birth of baby Samuel to Lurania and Samuel Eggleston

Lurania Powers Burgess Eggleston

Lurania Powers Burgess Eggleston

Lurania Powers Burgess Eggleston, who was 38 years old at that time, gave birth to a son on the bleak winter day of January 16th. Patty Sessions was a prominent midwife during that time. Fortunately for us, she kept records in her diary and an account book. Her notation under the date of 16 January was “Put sister Eggleston to bed with a son Samuel E.” “Putting to bed” was her way of noting the confinement and delivery of a baby. Patty’s account book showed that Samuel Eggleston paid $2.00 for her services January 16.

The birth of this child must have brought great joy to the family at a time of great suffering. He was given the name of his father – Samuel. He may have also been named after Samuel H. Smith who along with Orson Hyde had introduced the family to the Restored Gospel. (They had named their last born son Orson Hyde Eggleston)

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Early Eggleston Genealogical Research

When I began serious Eggleston genealogical research, I learned to look to earlier research first. It is always a good idea to check what has been done, so as to not waste time and effort. Unfortunately, I found that some earlier work was not correct. Errors and false assumptions had been perpetuated by those who accepted earlier works without necessarily thinking things through or further checking.

Early Correspondence

My Great-grandfather Orson H. Eggleston gathered genealogical information while serving a Mission for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Michigan in 1876-77. Apparently while there he corresponded with someone in New York City about the Eggleston family. He included this copy of a response with a letter to his father, seeking his father’s advice on how to respond. He seemed hopeful that this Nicholas would have helpful information. I am not sure what happened with this, but it does indicate how early Orson tried to learn more about the larger Eggleston family.

1876 Melville Eggleston genealogical research

In an earlier family letter Eliza Barron told her brother Samuel Eggleston about a letter she had received from Rev. A. Eggleston of Broome County, New York. He was requesting information about family members, including birth, death and marriage dates. Eliza seemed skeptical of his intentions and unsure of his address. It is not known what response Samuel gave her or if she ever sent any information to this person. This would have been the Ambrose mentioned in this letter from Melville, who apparently had been researching and collecting information on the Eggleston family.

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News and Insights from Old Family Letters

Old family letters give some great information and wonderful insights into the lives and relationships of our ancestors.

Some family letters written to Samuel Eggleston were included on typed sheets I found with records of Theron Eggleston at the home of his daughter Ruth. With these letters were others with genealogical information that Orson Hyde Eggleston gathered while on his mission and genealogical correspondence. These had all apparently been transcribed by Theron or his wife. I don’t know what happened to the original letters.

I found this correspondence to be quite interesting. The family letters give some insights into personalities and family relationships as well as provided some genealogical clues which were helpful in my research.

The Family Letters – First from Eliza Barron

This earliest letter, dated 1862, was to Samuel Eggleston from his sister Eliza Barron. Samuel had recently migrated from Iowa to Utah. Eliza passed away in 1869. Eliza mentioned their brother Ansel, who was somewhat of a mystery – to us, and possibly to them. This letter provided clues to help me find him in records in Michigan, where he died in 1871. We also get a glimpse of personalities from the things Eliza said about her brother as well as the colorful way she expressed herself. I would like to have known Aunt Eliza.

Eliza also mentioned a letter from Rev. A. Eggleston, who would be the Ambrose Eggleston mentioned in later genealogical correspondence. This letter to Eliza may have begun that correspondence.

1862 family letters from Eliza Barron to Samuel Eggleston

 

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Family Genealogies Gathered by Orson Hyde Eggleston

Early members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints were encouraged to search out their family genealogies in order to provide baptisms for their dead family members. Samuel and Lurania Eggleston were the first of our family to join the LDS Church. I am not sure if Samuel did any active genealogy, but it does appear that he encouraged his son Orson in efforts to gather information. While on his Mission in Michigan during 1876-1877, Orson visited family members and obtained names and dates. He wrote to his father several letters with such information.

I don’t know what happened to the original letters. It appears that at some point Orson’s son Theron, or his wife, transcribed these letters. I found several typed pages of letters when I visited Theron’s daughter Ruth. I made copies of them. They were all typed on numbered legal size sheets and include some notes made by whoever transcribed them. Included with these letter were correspondence with W. E. Hagens and other letters from Orson to his father and from family members to Samuel.

There is also some question about whether Orson kept this information himself or simply sent it on to his father in these letters. Orson went to the Logan Temple in 1914 to do proxy baptisms. The records of the work done then do not fit exactly the information in these letters. There is a possibility that some of the handwritten information was misread or typos made when typing them up.

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The Missionary Journal of Orson Hyde Eggleston

Discovery of the Journal

Orson Hyde Eggleston served a Mission for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in 1876-1877. He was called at the General Conference of the Church on October 7, 1876. Years ago, after learning that Orson Hyde Eggleston had kept a journal of his Mission to Michigan, I went to the Church History Library to see this Journal. This was when the Church History Library was located in the Church Office Building, before the beautiful new building was built. The procedure to view items in the Archives required checking in with ID, leaving everything I had brought with me in a locker, except a pencil and paper. No electronic devices allowed, though a cell phone with a camera was not something I even had then. Items were requested and then brought to a viewing room. I painstakingly transcribed – by hand – the entire journal. It is not a very long journal, and in a very small notebook. I then went home and typed from my notes a two page transcription of the journal.

 

 

 

Early Mormon Missionaries Database

Then surprisingly the other day I received an email from FamilySearch:

“We’ve identified early missionaries in your family tree. Learn where and when they served and read their mission stories. Elder Orson Hyde Eggleston  Mission: Wisconsin Dis US” – with a link to a wonderful new Database on Early Mormon Missionaries through lds.org. This page includes links to the Missionary Registers and also a link to Orson’s Journal, which I saw years ago in the Church History Library. Now with a few clicks you can all see this journal.

The page of this Early Mormon Missionaries database includes some basic information about Orson and his mission, which apparently was taken from the Missionary Registers.

Orson was 35 years old when he was called to this mission. His call was to the Wisconsin District, though most of his service was in the State of Michigan. He was set apart on October 21, 1876 by Orson Pratt. He was a member of the 53rd Quorum of the 70 in Ogden, Utah at the time of the call. He served from October 1876 to July 1, 1877. Also included is information about his birth date, place and parents – though someone transcribed his mother’s name as Serana P Burgess. (It looks like an L to someone like me who has read the name many times)

I seem to have lost the computer file of my transcription, so I have posted images, which might be slightly less readable than the document copied and pasted here would be, but probably more easily readable than the handwritten journal. And since future generations might not even learn to read cursive script, this transcription will remain available here. For further discussion about this Mission and information about people mentioned in the journal, see The Joseph Eggleston Family: Seven Generations from Joseph (d.1767) of Stonington, Connecticut to Joseph (1885-1965) of Utah and Wyoming (Including Maternal Lines: Hill, Burgess, Titus, Sammis & Johnson) by Karen Eggleston Stark., pp. 412-414.

The Family Bible of Orson Hyde Eggleston

Family Bibles are wonderful sources of information. I found this Bible when I visited Cousin Ruth several years ago. She indicated that it had belonged to Orson Hyde Eggleston and had been given to her father Theron Eggleston, probably by his father Orson. It appears that it may have been in the possession of Joseph S. Eggleston at some point and he may have entered at least some of this information himself. Ruth let me take this Bible to make photocopies of the Family Record entries.

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