2001 An Eggleston Genealogy Odyssey Part 5 – Marcellus, New York

Our 2001 Eggleston Genealogy Odyssey continued in Marcellus, New York, which turned out to be a goldmine. Not only were we able to walk around the area where Samuel and Rebecca Eggleston migrated in the early 1800’s, but we found precious Church records mentioning many family members.

After leaving the Kellogsville Cemetery for the second time the morning of Friday August 10th, we drove back up and around Skaneateles Lake. On the east side of the lake are very large homes along the lakefront. Then we turned and went up the hill further east to find farms.

The Rosehill/Thornhill/Marcellus Baptist Church

Rosehill Baptist Church

We drove past some cornfields and found the Thornhill Church (It is now called Rosehill Baptist Church-that is what is on the sign) on the corner. It is an old white frame building with a tower and steeple in front. I learned from histories that it was built in 1849, with the tower added later. The windows are large and rectangular with a row of different colored stained glass panes around the large rectangles.

Inside the church smelled old and musty. The door was open but we found no one inside. The chapel is obviously the original part of the building but there are additions. These included a kitchen, an area where they had copy machines and a very recent addition of a large recreation hall. (The Pastor seemed quite proud of this new addition.)

I had contacted Pastor Olcott before our trip. He told us that there were early records of the church and we were welcome to visit and look at them. We saw a phone in the front entry of the church and I was going to call the Pastor, but it rang and was picked up at their home next door.

The Thornhill Cemetery

We went outside to the adjacent Thorn Hill Cemetery and easily found Benjamin and Elizabeth Eggleston’s graves. Next to them is a large monument for Sarah Gardner, Theodore’s wife and on the other side is Ruth, wife of Thomas Bryant.

I found an interesting Cornell marker which was hard to read. There was a verse at the bottom. I am still curious about this one.

The Church Records

While we were looking in the Cemetery, Pastor Olcott came walking over from the house. He took us inside and upstairs to an office. Then he dug through a file cabinet and pulled out the records. There were two old long, narrow books and some small, newer ones. He left us there and went out to mow the lawn. I was amazed that we were allowed to handle these books, one that was almost 200 years old, without cotton gloves or any supervision.

I looked through the oldest book and found many familiar names. Dad looked through the next book (abt 1825-1850) and made some notes.

I should note that this trip was early in the digital age. I was taking pictures with a camera that used film. Digital cameras were not very good then and we did not have one. Of course, we did not have cell phones with cameras – we didn’t even have a cell phone. I did have a scanner at home, but it would have been awkward to haul it around. Portable scanners were available but expensive, and I had not invested in one. So we were rather low tech with our attempts to capture the information in these records.

We marked some pages and went downstairs and made copies on their copy machine. Unfortunately they only had regular size paper and these pages were longer. And yes, we were flipping pages in a 200 year old book and throwing them up on the copy machine.

It was getting lunchtime and I suggested Dad go out and make sandwiches, but he stayed to help me. We ate lunch there in the parking lot. I could have stayed all day going through those records and would like to have copied all of them. We did copy membership lists and pages that had information about Eggleston family members.

Marcellus

We drove around the area some and I tried to determine where the Egglestons had lived. I had an old map that I had used when doing research into land records. It showed the various lot numbers, so it gave us some idea of where family members would have lived.

Old map of Marcellus

Samuel Jr. had land on Lot 59 which bordered the lake so would have had some pretty lake front. There is not really any beach, but the woods probably would have gone right out to the water. The farms were probably up on the hill and their home would have been along the road, likely the same road we drove on.

Skaneateles Lake

The land probably was rather wooded originally, then they cleared farms. There are still wooded areas and many farms. Samuel Sr., Nathan, Benjamin, Joseph and the Tanners would have had more level land further east and away from the lake.

 

Photo showing the Motorhome on the road headed toward Skaneateles Lake

We left Marcellus with our copies of the precious Church records. I continued to be concerned about those records. They could so easily be damaged or destroyed – it was amazing to me that they hadn’t been already. After I returned home, I wrote to Pastor Olcott, thanking him for showing us the records and suggested some ways he could have the records digitally preserved. I haven’t seen them show up online. I hope something has been done to preserve them.

The Life of Joseph Smith Eggleston

A life sketch of Joseph Smith Eggleston adapted from one written by his son DeLoss which was included in my book.

Joe’s Birth and Childhood

Joseph Smith Eggleston was born on the July 5, 1885, in Eden Weber Co. Utah, to Annie Christine Johnson and Orson Hyde Eggleston. There was some question as to the date, maybe because the 4th of July was often celebrated on his birthday. His father Orson’s journal and his death certificate place it on the 5th.

Birth of Joseph Smith Eggleston

Birth date of Joseph Smith Eggleston in the middle of the right page.

Joseph was the second son of Orson and his third wife Annie Christine Johnson. The first child, David Orson was born June 15, 1883 and died November 3, 1884. Annie’s father, Peter Johnson, was a counselor in the bishopric with Orson. He also was working on the bridge over the Ogden river at the head of Ogden Canyon. He got caught in a storm and came home cold and wet, caught pneumonia and died December 17. 1878. Orson lived in a home they bought from Richard Ballantyne.

Orson H. Eggleston’s home in Eden, where Joseph may have been born

Probably due to the pressure on polygamists Orson moved his family to Star Valley Wyoming. They were some of the first settlers of the town of Afton.

Young Joe Eggleston

I do not know much about Dad’s childhood in Afton. I guess that it was normal. He did break his arm and had it in a cast for several months. When they took it out of the cast he couldn’t straighten it out so he carried a bucket of rocks around for a while to get it straight. This is why for the rest of his life his shoulders were not square they were low on one side.

Homesteading Mormon Row

In his late teens Joe became interested in the Jackson Hole area. There was no road, only a very rough trail up the Snake River canyon. So the way into Jackson hole was over the Teton Pass where Grandpa and Great Grandpa Wilson and Cheney had built the road. Dad carried the mail over this pass and became acquainted with the residents of the valley. He had many stories about going over the pass in the winter and fighting the snow. I do not know when he moved into the valley.

The first land grant on what is called Mormon Row was granted in 1896. Several grants were made in that area. By 1910 Dad and his uncle Jacob Johnson had built a cabin on the land to which he later got a homestead title in 1916.

Land Grant for the Mormon Row Homestead

Dad and Jacob dug a 100’ well for their drinking water. On June 13, 1910 Joseph Eggleston and Jacob Johnson appropriated four cubic feet per second of water from Ditch Creek, sufficient to irrigate four 70 acre parcels. They dug a ditch to carry the water to their farm. You can still see the ditch.

The Johnson-Eggleston Ditch in 2004

The church was right across the street from their place as was the store. The town was called Grovont which is a corruption of the name of the river Gros Ventre which runs south of Black Tail Butte into the Snake River. This area is now part of Teton National Park.

During this time Dad did many things including feeding the Elk on the reservation just north of Jackson. He told me that he learned that the Moose would not bother you if you looked them in the eye but if you turned your back they would attack you. I don’t know if that is true and I don’t think I will try it. He also helped build roads in the area including the Hoback road.

Marriage to Cuma Cheney

Cuma and Joe Wedding photo

Marriage License for Joseph and Cuma

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dad married Mom, Talitha Cuma Cheney, in the Salt Lake Temple January 15, 1914 and she moved into the home on Mormon Row. They worked in the Church and Mom became Relief Society President. Dad was president of the Sunday School, among other jobs.

While they lived on Mormon Row they had four children, Alice, Wesley, Lola, and Orland. Life in that area was interesting but the winters are rough. The decision was made to move back to Utah and settle in Eden. When Dad left that area he sold the farm to Jacob who later sold it to the Chambers who lived there until it burned down about 1936. It was used briefly as a post office.

Back to Eden

In 1919, Dad and Mom made the move from Jackson Hole to Eden. They bought the place in Middle fork where they lived until dad died. This turned out not to be the best move. Dad bought a herd of cows and hay to feed them for the winter. The next spring the bottom fell out of the market and the value of the cattle dropped. Dad always felt that he would have been better off if he had done nothing that winter. It took a long time to get out of that debt.

I regret that we don’t have a good picture of the house. This is Dale and DeLoss in front of the house

I have always been amazed at all Dad did. The house he bought was not a big one. It was one story with outside plumbing. He dug basement walls and poured cement for the walls and foundation then diverted the irrigation ditch to wash the dirt out of the basement area then poured the basement floor. He dug a huge septic tank on the side hill bellow the house and dug a 30’ well on the north side of the house. Then he put in a pump and we had running water and an inside toilet. The girls slept upstairs and the boys downstairs.

Four more children were born in Eden: Laura, Melvin, Dale, and DeLoss. Actually, I was born in the Dee Hospital in Ogden. When Dad bought the place light was from a carbide tank in the yard by the granary. Electric power came in so that was not used. I don’t know how he could afford some to the things he bought like a milking machine and a Maxwell sedan car. However, I do not remember the car running. It was in the barn and we used to play in it. Our transportation was horse and wagon or buggy or in the winter a sleigh.

View of the barn and other buildings on the Eden farm

The Milk Route

In the middle to late 1930’s Dad became interested in hauling milk for the dairy. By 1938 he had a contract with Weber Central Dairy to pick up the milk in Eden and transfer it to a truck to take it to the Dairy in Ogden, That year he also got the contract for Liberty which included the trip to the Dairy.

This was a daily job, early in the morning you milked the cows, always at least 22 head, then you took off for the milk route. Dad always left first to go to Liberty because it was farther and more milk cans. Then Orland or Melvin and Dale would take the Eden route and meet dad and put all the cans on his truck to take them to the Dairy. By the time I was 16, I went with Dad on the Liberty route while Melvin and Dale took the Eden route. Then, when school was on, we would go to school while Dad went to the Dairy. In the summer someone would go with Dad to the Dairy.

We used the truck from the Eden route to haul hay etc. By 1943 Melvin was in the Marines and Dale was in the Army. I ran the Eden route and Dad ran the Liberty route. Then without a word to me he gave up both routes. I thought I had a job for life but that changed.

Although I never heard him, Dad did play the violin and must have been good at it.

I did not know it but Mother had health problems. I still do not know what they were but in the fall of 1940 she went in for surgery. There were complications and she died November 4, 1940. This was a blow to me. Dad never talked much with me but he had a hard time also.

Marriage to Stella Cheney Robinson

August 20, 1941 Joe married Stella Cheney Robinson, my mother’s niece. She had four children, LeGrand, Dell, Edith, and Lee. LeGrand was just a few months older than I was. I left home in 1943.

Stella and Joe with Alice

Dad settled down and seemed to have a good life with Stella. They were active in the ward and did well. There was a plot of ground in Eden that was covered with Morning Glory. This weed is hard to get rid of but Dad made a deal with the owner that if he would let him use it he would get rid of the weed. Dad started by plowing it often and then he planted strawberries and raspberries on that ground. Records show that many years he supplied the church welfare with strawberries and squash from that ground.

Back in the 1930’s Dad’s uncle Peter Johnson, who had been running their ranch since his mother had died, became so senile that he could not take care of himself. His brothers and sister had their own lives, so Dad took care of Peter. We also started to take care of the farm. He became so bad that they brought him to live with us. This did not work so he was committed to the Hospital in Provo where he died in 1939. We continued to run the farm until it was sold to Dr. Wikstrom mainly to pay our debt to him.

Last Days of Joseph

Joe in his later years – as I, Karen, remember him

The last of February or the first of March 1967 there was a big snow storm. Dad had made an appointment to have his truck inspected for the State inspection. There was about 8” of snow on the road but he had an appointment so he started to drive to Huntsville. Just past our pasture he skidded off the road and rolled the truck. It did not do much damage but he was upset. He got it inspected but the worry and accident upset him and he developed bleeding ulcers. It got so bad that they put him in the Hospital at St. Benedicts and started to give him blood. They would not operate on him because he was too old (only 81). He kept getting worse until the blood was just going through him. On March 4, 1967 he passed away.

Obituary of Joseph S. Eggleston

Joseph was buried in the Eden Meadow View Cemetery next to his wife Cuma. Stella was later buried on his other side.

Note:

My book is The Joseph Eggleston Family: Seven Generations from Joseph (d.1767) of Stonington, Connecticut to Joseph (1885-1965) of Utah and Wyoming (Including Maternal Lines: Hill, Burgess, Titus, Sammis & Johnson) 2010.

2001 An Eggleston Genealogy Odyssey Part 4 – Sempronius, New York

A continuation of the 2001 Eggleston Genealogy trip with my Father to places where our ancestors had lived. Part 4 is our visit to Sempronius, New York.

Cayuga County

After our fruitless Cemetery searching in Springwater, New York, we visited some L.D.S. Church History sites in Western New York. Then we drove toward Cayuga County. As we came into the village of Skaneateles we saw the Lake View Cemetery right there by the lake. The village of Skaneateles is quite quaint with nice homes, especially those along the lake. There are boat docks and it appears to be quite a recreational or resort area. We drove down the west side of the lake, which is in Cayuga County. The lake is not very wide, but is long and we drove quite a while south. It was now cloudy and threatening rain, but was also cooling off.

New Hope

Map of Niles. The area marked New Hope is near where Thomas Marsh lived. Toward the bottom is “Kellogsville” which is just north of the Burgess land and the Kellogsville Cemetery, which are on the Sempronius map below.

I had some maps, so we went directly to the New Hope Cemetery. We looked around and saw lots of Cadys, but unfortunately we don’t know which Cadys are related to Selinda Olive Cady Burgess.

We went to the New Hope Mills, which had been recommended. They were closed for the day. (This was just after 4:00) We did walk over the covered bridge and saw the 1823 vintage water wheel.

We drove around the area a little. There is a picnic area closer to the lake which is said to be a childhood play area of Millard Filmore. Not too far from it is the area on which is written T. Marsh on the 1853 Map.

We stopped here, where there is a beautiful view of the lake (would have been more beautiful without all the clouds). From the road the land slopes gently down to the lake. Across the road, going up a hill, is where the Marsh land would have been. This is mostly cleared farmland.

I assume that Samuel and Lurania Eggleston would have lived somewhere near there. Samuel went back to Sempronius after his family had moved to Springwater. His brief autobiography states:

“I lived in the town of Marcellus until I was 13 years old, then my father, with his family, then moved into the town of Springwater, Livingston County, state of New York. My brothers and sisters numbered ten in family. I lived with my father until I was 19 years old, then I went to live with my brother-in-law to learn the tanner’s trade. I lived with them until I was 23 years old . . .”

Thomas Marsh, who had married Samuel’s sister Lucy, would have been the brother-in-law Samuel would have lived with. It was while living here that Samuel married Lurania Powers Burgess, whose family lived nearby.

Sempronius, New York

Sempronius in Cayuga County, New York is where the Burgess family settled. Seth Burgess brought his family from Stillwater, Saratoga County to Sempronius around 1800. He purchased the entire Lot #47. According to maps the Kellogsville Cemetery was on this original land owned by Seth Burgess. The area consists of farms and some wooded areas.

Early map of Sempronius showing Lot #47 in the upper left corner, just below where it says “Kellogsville”

The original township of Sempronius was later divided up to create two additional towns – Niles and Moravia. Niles was to the north and we passed through that area first. Moravia was to the west and was where we later spent the night.

Kellogsville Cemetery – 1st Visit

We easily spotted the Kellogsville Cemetery and started looking around. I found Thomas and Lucy Eggleston Marsh’s graves. Thomas’s stone faces one way (the way most are facing) and Lucy’s next to it faces the other way. Leaning on Lucy’s stone is another broken off stone which is Lucy Marsh, a daughter of Thomas by his second wife, who died at age 14.

Headstones of Thomas and Lucy Eggleston Marsh with another stone of Thomas’ daughter Lucy leaning on Lucy’s

I was going around with my notebook writing inscriptions. Thomas’ stone reads:

Thomas Marsh born in Marlboro, VT Dec 22, 1790 died April 17, 1870

To live in Christ to die is vain

Lucy’s has a nice verse on it:

Mrs. Lucy, wife of Thomas Marsh died Nov 18, 1832 age 39 y 10 m 18 d

Go home my friends, Dry up your tears.

We shall meet again When Christ appears

I was walking around with my camera taking pictures. Then it started raining. At first it was light and I just kept on, then it started to get heavier and Dad got umbrellas from the motorhome. We must have looked like idiots wandering around in the rain, me clutching my notebook so it wouldn’t get wet. I wanted to find Seth and Olive Burgess, but the rain was really getting bad so we quit.

Refuge from the Storm

We drove in the rain down the old salt road (The road the Cemetery is on) to Sayles Corners, which was named after the Sayles family who migrated with the Burgess and Titus families. Then we drove on down to Moravia. We passed another large Cemetery, but didn’t stop. (As the trip went on every Cemetery we passed made me want to jump out and look at headstones.)

It was really pouring as we got to the Village of Moravia. I remember seeing Cady’s Tavern which I had read about. We found a Pizza Place, parked at a nearby bank parking lot and ran to it. Even with umbrellas, we were wet when we got there. This was the happening place in town. They did a take out business as well as having a few tables to eat in. We ordered and waited and waited. People kept coming in dripping wet to get take out orders. My feet and legs were covered with wet weeds from the Cemetery and even though it was raining it was still warm enough to be steamy. We finally got our pizza and ate it.

After eating, we got directions to Fillmore Glen Stake Park, which happened to be just down the road. When we got to the park, I made a phone call at the office to the Thorn Hill Church. I had contacted the pastor before our trip, so I wanted to let them know we would be there in the morning. I also tried to call the Sempronius Church but just got an answering machine and we had no number for them to call back.

Filmore Glen State Park was a nice park and campground, but it rained almost all night so it was too wet to enjoy it. The roof of the motorhome started leaking sometime in the night. Dad got up about 5 am to check on it, then our neighbors got up early so it was not a great night’s sleep.

Morning

In the morning we drove around the park a little. We saw Millard Fillmore’s cabin which is there at the park. I think it is the cabin where he was born. It is a simple small log cabin. Since he was a contemporary of Samuel and Lurania Eggleston, I think the early homes of the Burgess family there were probably similar cabins. Later they would have been added on to and improved or larger houses built.

We drove through the “glen” which is like a miniature grand canyon. It is interesting that just a short distance from the Village is this big gash in the earth which is actually quite deep. The area was really wooded and there were bugs. It had stopped raining but was foggy, giving the place an eerie look.

Sayles Corners Historical Marker

We drove back up through Sempronius and stopped at Sayles Corners to read the Historical marker. The Burgess’ land was just up the road, so they were quite close neighbors. I think Rhoda Titus must have lived somewhere in between those families.

Kellogsville Cemetery – 2nd visit

I wanted to look some more at the Kellogsville Cemetery for Seth and Olive Burgess, so we stopped and looked around again. I went to where I had left off, but Dad noticed another area we hadn’t even seen the day before. This was beyond a little gully and up on a little hill. It was very overgrown, not well taken care of like the rest of the Cemetery, and appeared to be the oldest part of the Cemetery.

Dad yelled to me “Does Olive Burgess mean anything?” He had found Seth and Olive’s graves. Seth’s stone is very worn and hard to read but it is next to Olive’s which is clear.

Headstones of Seth and Olive Burgess

Then Dad stepped on a stone laying on the ground. After removing some leaves we could see that it was Joel Burgess, their son who had died in 1807, probably one of the first burials there. We looked around and I was sad to see more broken and worn stones. I think Rhoda Titus must be buried there also, but probably unmarked or one of these unreadable stones.

I felt some satisfaction in finding these graves and was now ready to drive around the lake to Marcellus.

2001 An Eggleston Genealogy Odyssey – Part 3 Western New York

A continuation of the account of my journey with my Dad in 2001 when we visited sites significant to Eggleston genealogy. This Part 3 was in the Western part of New York August 8-9, 2001.

After leaving Nauvoo, Illinois we spent some time in Kirtland, Ohio. The Egglestons did not live there, but the Cheneys did. Dad and I did not do anything specifically related to Eggleston genealogy, so for the purposes of the blog, I will move on to Western New York.

We left Kirtland about 3:30 in the afternoon on August 8th. In Erie, Pennsylvania there was an accident, then road construction slowed us. We got off the freeway to get gas then seeing how backed up it was decided to try an alternate route. Later we managed to get back to the freeway and it was a little better. We split from the expressway as it entered New York. Then we took the southern route through Chautuaqua county.

Drive Through Chautauqua County

I was excited to see this area. I had done a good deal of research into family members who went to Chautuaqua County, New York. We didn’t stop because we were detoured around construction, so we really didn’t know where to go. We just drove around Chuatuaqua Lake which is pretty. I tried to take a picture from the moving vehicle, but it didn’t really capture it.

Chautauqua Lake

The country here was rolling hills and it appeared to be good farming land. We then drove on the Southern route through the Allegheny mountains. I hadn’t realized that New York had such mountains.

It was getting late and I was looking for a campground as we drove. We found the Sun Valley Campground near Arkport, New York. It was getting dark as we pulled in and we couldn’t find anyone in the office, so we just found a spot, then registered later. There weren’t restaurants around, so we zapped some microwave dinners. We planned to visit Springwater in the morning.

Why Springwater?

Springwater is a mysterious black hole of our family history. Samuel Eggleston‘s brief biography indicates that his father Samuel Jr. moved the family from Marcellus to Springwater when he was 13 years old. That places the move about 1817. Both of Samuel’s parents died in Sprinwater, Elizabeth in 1823 and Samuel in 1830. Many of their children married while they were in Springwater, but eventually they all moved away.

It has always seemed strange to me that Samuel apparently moved away from all the family in Marcellus to go to Springwater by himself. Most migrations were done as a family group, sometimes with members going at different times, but usually there was something to connect them to the new place.

Eggleston family members had started migrating to Chautauqua County, but Samuel chose to go to Springwater rather than join them there. I have begun to wonder if other family members went to Springwater with him, then quickly moved somewhere else. I also have to wonder if Samuel intended to join family in Cahutauqua County, but something caused him to stop and settle in Springwater. He did buy land there, so there must have been a plan to stay.

There may be some clues to the reason for this move in events of the year 1817.

1817 Mysteries

During early 1817 there were some interesting things happening in the Marcellus Baptist Church. Samuel Jr. joined the Marcellus Church in 1807 along with his brother Nathan. Elizabeth Eggleston was baptized a different day. John Eggleston, who may be another brother, also joined the Church that year.

Samuel had some difficulties with the Church beginning in 1816. Brothers were assigned to work with him. In March 1817, records indicated that he had a desire to continue with the Church, but on September 7, the members voted to exclude him.

In April of 1817, Elizabeth was given a letter of recommendation. This would be a letter to introduce her to another church, letting them know she had been a member in good standing. This letter would indicate that they were planning to move.  Also on April 17, 1817, Samuel and Elizabeth sold their land in Marcellus, which would also indicate plans to move.

That same year Oliver Eggleston joined the Marcellus Church, then quickly had some issues with them and he was excluded from membership. We know nothing about his life after that point. John, the one who also joined the church in 1807, and his wife Rachel sold their land in Marcellus in October of 1817. They then seem to have disappeared off the face of the earth.

The year 1817 could have been one of those “purging times” when the Church became strict about covenant behavior and excluded those who were not living up. Possibly these Egglestons may have had problems getting along with other church members and even family members. Maybe the conflicts were so severe that moving seemed a solution?

Both Samuel and John owned land along the lake. Were there issues with their land?

Seeing Springwater

As we drove into Springwater that morning, I saw why maps showed so many places called “gull”. The land is very hilly – full of hills and gullys, with the main part of town being in a small valley. A History of the town of Springwater placed the Eggleston farm “On the east hill south of the big gull.” There were so many hills and gulls and no way to tell which this referred to.  It is very wooded, but there are many farms. I thought that this would not be the easiest land to farm, though it is very pretty.

View of Springwater from the Ashley Cemetery on the south end of the town.

Searching Cemeteries

We began and ended Thursday August 9th in Cemeteries. Knowing that both Samuel and Elizabeth had died here, I was hoping to find their graves. I had searched online before going and found no online records of their graves, but I did find 10 Cemeteries. It would have taken lots of time to find and search all 10, so I picked out a few close to the main road. Some were well kept, but others very neglected. I could see the possibility of buried, broken or unreadable stones that might be theirs.

We stopped first at the Ashley Cemetery which is on the south end of the town up on a hill. There was a beautiful view from there and I took a picture. This was a nice, small, and well kept cemetery, but no Egglestons.

We looked for the Green Gull Cemetery, which seemed like a possibility since a town history placed Egglestons “On the east hill south of the bill gull.” After a few times down the road, we found “Greens Gull” a wooded gully which appeared to be private property with a home there. We saw no sign of a Cemetery.

Find a Grave currently has 67 memorials for graves there. The earliest burial was 1829. Interestingly Amos Root, who purchased Samuel Eggleston’s land from his children, is buried there. This cemetery actually may have been close to the Eggleston farm.

We then went to the main part of town, such as it is. There are really only a few buildings which would constitute “town”. The Capron Cemetery was a very small, old cemetery on a side street. We almost missed it altogether. This was a very sad place. Being so close to town, it was disappointing that it was so neglected. Many of the stones were broken, buried or unreadable. We looked but found nothing.

It is supposedly the oldest cemetery in town, with burials beginning in 1810. According to Find a Grave there are 27 known burials plus some unmarked fieldstones. It is possible that Samuel and Elizabeth are buried there, but we would never know if they were in one of those graves.

We went to another Cemetery in similar shape. This was the “Christian Church Cemetery”. There is no longer a church anywhere near. I had thought this less likely because the Egglestons were Baptists and “Christian Church” sound like it would be another denomination, but it was accessible so we looked around. It was very overgrown and the remains of a tree fort on the edge of it suggested that it had been some kind of spooky playground for kids. We didn’t find anything.

The last Cemetery we searched was the Evergreen Cemetery which was much nicer and kept up. It also had many newer graves and appeared to be still in use. The stones were easy to read but no familiar names.

Moving On

We finally bid farewell to Springwater, leaving behind the mystery of the burial places of Samuel and Elizabeth. We drove on winding country roads to Manchester and Palmyra.

Cemetery Tour – South Park Cemetery, Jackson, Wyoming

A virtual Cemetery Tour of the South Park Cemetery, the resting place of many of our Wilson and Cheney ancestors.

My Introduction to this Cemetery

My first visit to the South Park Cemetery in Jackson, Wyoming was in August 2002. Our family had enjoyed vacationing in Jackson Hole for years before I learned enough of our family history to search out graves of our ancestors. For this particular trip, my father joined us. Because he is an early riser and my husband and children are not, nor were they interested in being drug through a cemetery at any hour, Dad and I went alone early one morning.

South Park Cemetery, Jackson, Wyoming

The cemetery sits on a hill, south of the town of Jackson, in the area known as South Park where Sylvester Wilson settled in 1889. There are spectacular views from this point. The cemetery itself is not large and most of it was rather overgrown. A fence enclosed many of the Wilson family graves.

The Beginning of the Cemetery

The Wilson and Cheney families had come to Jackson Hole in 1889. They had two years before there was a need for a cemetery. That need came because of a diphtheria epidemic. This started on the Idaho side of the Tetons. Sylvester’s son John had gone to meet his sister Rebecca who had not seen her family since her marriage in 1889. She wanted to come visit the family. The nearest railroad stop was Eagle Rock. For some reason Rebecca was not able to make the trip. John received this news when he arrived at Eagle Rock. He then decided to visit his Uncle Nick Wilson. Nick was away from home  doctoring victims of this epidemic, while three of his children died at his home.

John was exposed to this disease and carried it across the mountains. When he returned home he bathed and thoroughly washed his clothes before entering the house, but still the disease spread. It claimed two of the Wilson children, thirteen year old Sarah Ellen “Ella” on June 12, 1891, and ten year old Joseph on June 30, 1891.

There is a lone pine tree which stands out on the hill and can be seen for miles around. I recall being told a story about this tree being planted when these children died. I now can’t find any details of that story. The tree still stands, however, and is very large as can be seen by the contrast with the truck parked by it.

Marker Commemorating the 100th Anniversary of the Cemetery

1891       SOUTH PARK CEMETERY      1991

This, the first cemetery in Jackson Hole, was begun in 1891 during the diphtheria epidemic with the deaths of Sarah and Joseph Wilson. It is hereby dedicated in its centennial in honor of their parents:

1840 Sylvester Wilson 1895

1844 Mary Wood Wilson 1915

Sylvester led the first families to settle in Jackson’s Hole over Teton Pass in November 1889, in the first assembled wagons to come into the valley. He was a faithful member of the Mormon Church and organized its first branch here in 1893. The first school was held in his home in 1892, and he was instrumental in getting the first County School District in the valley. He brought the first hand operated sawmill and riding plow into Jackson Hole. He was a musician and played the fiddle at community affairs. He was a leader of men. Mary was a midwife and administered to the sick. They had 12 children and strove for the best possible education for pioneer families. They were hardy, public-spirited pioneers, prominent ranchers and stalwart pillars of Jackson’s Hole, contributing greatly to its progress, it’s productivity and its culture.

This old stone was probably one of the first placed in the cemetery

Sylvester and Mary Wood Wilson

There are two large Wilson markers within the fence. The one has Sylvester Wilson on one side, Mary Wood Wilson on another side as seen in the smaller photo, and Ellen and Joseph, the children who died in 1891 on the other side showing in this photo.

Sylvester Wilson A Minute Man in Every Sense of the Word

This other marker with a fancy top, also appears to be for Sylvester Wilson.

Mary Wilson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There are smaller markers for Sarah Ellen and Joseph, the children who died in 1891.

Wilson Family Members

The South Park Cemetery contains graves of many members of the Wilson family. I did not take photos of all of them. Most can be found on Find a Grave. Uncle Nick is my exception. His grave is here as well as markers commemorating his experience with the Pony Express.

The Pony Express Markers

 

 

 

THE PONY EXPRESS 1860-1861
A colorful chapter of American history was the Pony Express. For a year and a half prior to completion of the first transcontinental telegraph, young men riding fast horses carried the mail between St. Joseph, Missouri and Sacramento, California via Salt Lake City, Utah.

Clad in red shirts, blue denim trousers and leather boots, these courageous youth rode at breakneck speed through darkness or night and blaze of day, in storms, wind and sun, across burning deserts of sand and alkali, over snow-covered mountains, through roaring swollen streams, and through hostile Indian country. Several of the 114 riders lost their lives to Indian attacks.

Among those severely wounded was Elijah Nicholas “Nick” Wilson (1842-1915), a young Mormon boy who had lived with the Shoshone Indians in Idaho. He later founded the town of Wilson, in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. His autobiography, “The White Indian Boy” or “Uncle Nick among the Shoshones” is an American classic.

This Pony Express plaque was issued in his honor. It was presented to Utah State University in 1974 by his sons, Charles A. and George W. Wilson

Selar and Mary Alice Wilson Cheney

Selar Cheney took his family to Jackson Hole along with his wife Mary Alice’s family. They both died and were buried here along with most of their children. Mary Ellen died in Castledale, Emery County, Utah before the family came to Jackson Hole. Talitha Cuma Cheney Eggleston died in Ogden, Utah and is buried with her husband in the Eden Meadow View Cemetery.

Cheney, Ralph Wilson 1882-1919 May L. Sanborn 1877-1929 Ralph Sanborn 1914-1987 Irene Anderson Sullivan 1916-1974 Wyoma Rose Baley “Mrs. Gus” Lieutenant Army Nurse Corp. W. W. 2 Eto 66 Hospital Train 1919

 

David Henry Cheney Aug 5, 1888- Jan 3 1941 Lila Josephine Cheney Dec 14, 1887- July 2, 1984

 

Joseph H. Cheney Wyoming Pvt. 145 Field Artillery 40 Div W. W. 1 June 30, 1891 – July 3, 1949 Cheney, Pearl E. Mangum, wife of Joseph Howard Aug 2, 1905 – June 3, 1976 2nd marriage H.N. Hamilton

 

John F. Cheney Jan 4, 1885-Jan 31, 1937

I made another trip to this cemetery years later. On the drive up, I was surprised to see land being cleared in preparation for some kind of development. I wonder what our ancestors would think of their peaceful cemetery on a hill now surrounded by homes and I think a golf course. The view is still beautiful, if you look up.

Note:

Photos and information about these families is in my book Cheney Wilson Family History Book.

Talitha Cuma Cheney Eggleston

My grandmother, Talitha Cuma Cheney Eggleston died at a young age. At least from my present perspective it seems a very young age. I never had the privilege of knowing her. When I was compiling histories for the Cheney Wilson Family History Book, I realized that she was the only member of that family no one had written about. So I set out, as one who had not known her personally, to write a history of her life. This is taken largely from that account, with some additional photographs.

Early Life in Jackson Hole, Wyoming

Talitha Cuma Cheney was born May 3, 1893 in South Park, Wyoming. She grew up as on only daughter, with several brothers, all but one older than her. Her parents, Selar Cheney and Mary Alice Wilson, had another daughter Mary Ellen, but she had died as a child in Wilsonville, long before Cuma was born.

family of Selar and Mary Alice Wilson Cheney

Talitha Cuma is sitting on her father Selar’s lap. To the right of her is her grandmother Talitha Cuma Garlic Avery, whom she was named after. Other family members are Howard, David, Mother Mary Alice holding Fleming, and Selar Sylvester and Ralph standing in the back.

Talitha Cuma was named after her grandmother, Talitha Cumi Garlick Avery Cheney, though she went by the name “Cuma”. In some places it was written Cumi or Cumy, though her daughter Alice said she preferred Cuma to Cumy.

Fleming, Talitha Cuma and Howard Cheney

Cuma with her brothers Fleming and Howard

At the time Cuma was born, the South Park community consisted mostly of her extended family, so her childhood would have beenspent with her brothers and several cousins.

Education was very important to this family. The first school was organized in Jackson Hole in 1896. Cuma was too young to attend when the school first started, but was privileged to have this available from the time she was ready to start school. A 1899 souvenir card of School District No. 37 in Jackson lists 16 pupils with Cumy Cheney listed last, as she was probably the youngest.

 

Marriage to Joseph S. Eggleston

Cuma met Joseph Smith Eggleston, the son of Orson H. Eggleston and Annie Christine Johnson, who had been raised in Star Valley, Wyoming. Joe and his uncle Jacob Johnson homesteaded on a place called “Mormon Row” in Jackson Hole. This area is now within the boundaries of Teton National Park. The first land grant there was made in 1896. According to the Homestead Act, they were able to purchase 160 acres of land with the requirement that they build a dwelling, improve the land, and remain there for 5 years. After that time, a title to the land could be obtained.

By 1910, Joe and Jake had built a cabin and an irrigation ditch, known as the Johnson/Eggleston Ditch.  They later built a 100 foot well for drinking water and Joe built a two story home. Joseph Eggleston received a title to this land January 5, 1916.

Talitha Cuma Cheney and Joseph S. Eggleston

Wedding Picture of Cuma and Joseph Eggleston

Cuma was married to Joseph S. Eggleston, January 15, 1914 in the Salt Lake Temple. That would have been quite a journey to the Temple at that time, in a sleigh pulled by horses.

Life on Mormon Row

After their marriage, Cuma moved in with Joseph at Mormon Row. Joseph became Postmaster and for a time the Post Office was in their home. When the application was made for a Post Office, the name of Grovont was given to this community. The store was across the street from their home.

Grovont, Wyoming Post Office

Grovont Post Office. This may have been the Eggleston home

A branch of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints was organized and the Church was also right across the street from their home. Cuma was called to be Relief Society President. Though the flock was small at that time, they were also quite isolated, so Cuma would have had a great deal of responsibility to care for the needs of these families through sicknesses and deaths as well as organizing activities. Cuma also played the piano and lead music at times. Joseph was the President of the Sunday School there.

Grovont Sunday School. Cuma Eggleston standing second from the left holding baby Aice. Joe Eggleston is standing 3rd from the left.

Four children were born to Cuma and Joe at Mormon Row: Alice Christine was born November 20, 1914; Joseph Wesley was born April 26, 1916; Lola was born December 15, 1917 and Selar Orland was born May 5, 1919. Alice remembers being in the Post Office (one room in their home) while her mother took care of the mail, and being outside with her while she hung out the clothes to dry.

Though Mormon Row is a beautiful place, life was not easy there. Irrigation was necessary for any farming and the growing season was very short. Winters were very severe. Alice remembers the snow reaching their second story windows. She recalls her father shoveling a trench out to the barn and one time when he hitched the team and they sank in the snow. They were almost buried and he had to dig them out. There was an Elk reservation just north of Jackson. Joseph worked feeding the Elk there. The elk did not stay confined to the reservation however, and during the winters they would often feed on the hay these settlers had grown for their livestock.

After Joseph’s father died in February 1917, he brought his younger brother Theron to Mormon Row to live with them. Theron was about eleven years old and stayed with them for a few years, before going back to Afton to live with his sister.

Move to Eden, Utah

Joseph and Cuma decided to move to Eden, Utah where he had been born. They moved in 1919, traveling on a train, and bought a farm on Middle Fork. Joe bought a herd of cows and feed, but the next year the bottom fell out of the market and the value of cattle dropped. It took a long time for them to get out of debt. They had 20-30 milk cows as well as chickens, pigs and rabbits.

Joe and Cuma in 1930 with what appears to be the barn in the background

They lived in a small one story house with outside plumbing. Joe eventually dug a basement, dug a septic tank and a well, and installed indoor plumbing. Transportation then was mostly by horse and wagon or sleigh. Joe later bought a car, which they rarely used, and a truck for use on the farm.

While living here Cuma had four more children: Laura was born November 20, 1920; Melvin was born April 7, 1922; Dale was born May 19, 1925; and DeLoss was born July 10, 1926. All of her children were born at home, except DeLoss, who was born at the Dee Hospital in Ogden.

Cuma continued to serve in the Church while living in Eden. She taught Primary. Alice said of her mother:

“Mother was always active in the church. She had a strong testimony and love for the gospel. I think she was as near to a lady as any woman could be. Her language was correct and she used no profanity. She was a good example for her children. She did not send us off to church, she took us and made sure we behaved.”

Eden Ward records show that July 24, 1925, the Relief Society work day was spent sewing clothes for Sister Cuma Eggleston’s children, as sister Eggleston was ill at the time and the children needed the clothing to start school. (History of Eden Ward p. 239) Dale would have been just two months old at this time.

Cuma had some difficulties in bearing children, resulting in scar tissue. She did go to the hospital to have some surgery after Dale was born and could have still been recovering at this time. She was advised not to have any more children, but 13 months later DeLoss, her last child, was born. There was a need for further surgery later, but because money was scarce, she put off having this surgery.

Grandmother

Cuma in 1937

Grandma did live long enough to become a Grandmother, but Alice lived in California with her children. Other grandchildren who lived closer in Utah were born not long before she died. She did not have much time or opportunity to enjoy her grandchildren.

Cuma with her grandson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cuma and Joe with grandson Fred

Her Final Days

Alice recalls that her mother went without many things for her children. Cuma finally went to the hospital for surgery in the fall of 1940. There were complications, including pneumonia in both lungs. She died November 4, 1940 at the age of 49. The day Cuma died was election day and Alice recalled her being concerned about voting. Lola recalled that on Sunday her mother was sitting up in the bed crocheting and on Tuesday they got word that she had died.

Talitha Cuma Cheney Eggleston was buried in the Eden Valley View Cemetery.

2001 An Eggleston Genealogy Odyssey – Part 2 to Nauvoo, Illinois

On to Nauvoo, Illinois

The 2001 Eggleston Genealogy Odyssey continued after our visit to Winter Quarters and Council Bluffs, Iowa. After spending the night at a campground called “Sleepy Hollow”, Dad and I started early Monday August 5, and drove a few hours south from Iowa City. We crossed the Mississippi River on a Bridge by Fort Madison and drove into Nauvoo, Illinois from the east. What we saw was a small town on the bluff with some shops and houses and then right in front of us was the Nauvoo Temple under construction.

Nauvoo LDS Temple in 2001

Nauvoo Temple under construction in 2001

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Land Office

One of our first stops was the land office where we looked up where our ancestors had lived. We spent more time there than I expected and got quite a lot of information.

Historic Nauvoo Map

The Eggleston home on Block 62 and the Garlick home on Block 34. The Temple Block is the larger dark square in the Wells area

The Garlick home would have been a few blocks further beyond the trees in the photo below where it goes down into a gully. The Cheney family lived outside of town.

The Eggleston home

Scaffolding on the Temple in the middle of this shot from the area of the Eggleston home.

Looking toward where the land slopes down to a gully.

 

We found the lot where the Samuel Eggleston family lived (approximately). The Eggleston home in Nauvoo was located on Lot 1 of Block 62 on the corner of Hibbard and Woodruff Streets, only a few blocks north of the Temple site. Where this lot now sits, the street dead ends and there is a group of trees.

In August 2001, we could easily see the scaffolding on the tower of the Temple, then under reconstruction, from the Eggleston land. Depending on how many large trees were between them and the temple, Samuel and Lurania could have had a good view of the Temple being built. They may have been able to hear the sounds of construction from their home. Certainly it was a very short walk for Samuel to go there to help with the building. Their lot would have been large enough for a garden, but Samuel did not have sufficient land to farm in or outside of the city.

Shoemaker Shop

We went to main street and started with the Boot and Shoe Shop. One of the missionaries there mentioned that he was from Castle Dale, Utah and Dad had to ask if he knew about Wilsonville. He said his brother owns it. We had a nice discussion about Wilsonville. At another place there was a missionary who knew Mormon Row and had stayed at the Moulton’s place and looked at Grandpa’s collapsed cabin. It is a small world.

My Dad talking to the docent in front of the Shoe Shop

The shoemaking demonstration was very interesting. I kept thinking about Samuel. He was a shoemaker so the things we saw demonstrated would have been his daily work. At that time, shoemaking was quite an involved process. Besides the tanning of the leather, it included woodworking in making wooden shoe lasts and small wooden pegs with which to fasten on the soles, as well as the cutting and sewing of the leather pieces into shoes.

There were about six shoemaker shops in Nauvoo. Six shoemakers worked in this particular shop. It is likely that Samuel worked worked in such a shop with others, rather than having one of his own, though he could have worked out of his home.

In 1845 the “Tanners and Shoemakers Association” was formed in Nauvoo. It later expanded to include harnessmakers. They operated a tannery on Hibbard and Rich Streets near Colton’s brick yard, and a Boot, Shoe, Saddle and Harness Shop on Mulholland Street. The Association advertised in April 1845 for business as well as for calf-skins. Samuel very likely was a member of this Association and may have worked in the tannery or Boot and Shoe Shop.

Around Town

 

The Browning home and Gun Shop

We went to the Browning House and gun shop. It was interesting because we know the Browning family. They settled in Ogden, Utah. We learned some family history as well as information about the making of guns. I am pretty dumb about guns, so it was a learning experience for me. We also ran in to people we knew from home there. Small world again.

We visited the brick yard where we saw the process of making bricks. The Log School, the Tin Shop and the Bakery were interesting places we stopped. The Lyon Drug store was quite a large store with not only drugs but other typical articles that would have been in a general store. Our ancestors probably shopped there. An herb garden was outside which would have supplied many of the “drugs” in the store. The Lyons who owned this store were in-laws of Patty Sessions, the midwife who delivered Samuel Jr. in Winter Quarters. The log cabin next to the store was her home.

I must mention that it was very hot and humid. It was quite miserable being outside there. I thought it very interesting that these “restored” and reconstructed building which we were told had been build as the originals with the kinds of tools they had then and furnished with period furnishings, etc., all had AIR CONDITIONING. It was heaven to go inside. I was so glad they didn’t want to be so authentic as to make us tourists sweat.

Post office and Printing Office

The Post Office was of interest to me because we seem to have a history of Postal Work in our family. My grandfather Joseph Eggleston carried mail in Jackson Hole and had the Post Office in his home on Mormon Row. Selar Cheney had the Post Office in South Park named after him. Orson Hyde Eggleston was the Postmaster in Eden, Utah, and Samuel Eggleston was Deputy Postmaster in Pottawatamie County, Iowa. Sylvester Wilson had a Post Office at Wilsonville, Utah along the Old Spanish Trail.

The Printing Office and the Post Office behind the wagon

At the Post office they had the pigeonhole cabinet where letters were. They showed how they wrote both ways and folded the page into an envelop to conserve valuable paper. Postage was based on how far it was sent and it was usually sent postage due. It was expensive for the time so they were conservative.

The Printing Office showed the cases of type and how type was set then the page printed. It was interesting to think of Reuben and Orson Eggleston working in such a place, doing the tedious work of setting type.

 

Seventies Hall

 Nauvoo Seventies Hall

Seventies Hall

After walking through town we drove over to the Seventies Hall. It was quite an impressive building and we learned about it’s construction as well as about the purpose of it—to train missionaries. Upstairs were displays of artifacts that had been found as the restoration projects were done – lots of broken pottery and bottles. They told us that there had been a root cellar at Brigham Young’s home, which was basically a garbage dump after they built a new one attached to the house. Some of the broken dishes found were later glued together and now are displayed at his home.

We were able to look up ancestors who were seventies in the indexes and found some information about them. Most of this information was also at the Land and Records Office.

Samuel Eggleston, who was a Member of the Ninth Quorum of the Seventy. In the fall of 1844 several new Quorums of the Seventy were organized. The Ninth Quorum of Seventy was organized October 8, 1844. Samuel was ordained in October 1844, which was probably at the time this Quorum was organized. He is toward the beginning of the list of members. The Ninth Quorum recorded its first meeting October 16, 1844 in the Seventies Hall. Meeting notes included mention in most meetings of the members “speaking their feelings”.

Blacksmith Shop

Next to the Seventies Hall was the Blacksmith and Wheelwright Shop. We learned how a wagon and especially the wheels were made. When the Saints were preparing to leave Nauvoo, this was a major business and they had to work very quickly. At the Blacksmith shop the missionary actually made a small horseshoe while we watched and he talked. The term “smith’ refers to the smiting of metal. The term blacksmith apparently came from the process of dunking the shaped metal into horse manure or today oil is used, which turns it black.

I couldn’t help but try to imagine the Garlick family living in an abandoned blacksmith shop their first winter in Nauvoo.

Memorial Gazebo

Samuel Eggleston in the middle column

From there we went down to the river. There were water lillies floating on the water which were just beautiful. It really was a lovely and peaceful place. There is a Gazebo there with the names of people who died on the way west. Samuel Eggleston Jr. is listed there, as he died in Winter Quarters.

 

Other Visits and Activities

Though family history was one purpose of our trip, we were also very interested in L. D. S. Church History. So we of course saw all that there was to see and did all that we could fit in during our short trip. We went through homes of Brigham Young and some of the other Church leaders. We spent some time at the Red Brick store where the Relief Society was organized. A collection of artifacts which had been found in the city was on display there. We then went to the Mansion House and the Homestead where Joseph Smith and his family had lived.

The Missionaries presented a musical about the old days of Nauvoo in the Cultural Hall, which was very entertaining. Later in the evening we enjoyed the “Sunset on the Mississippi” program. There was a actually a very beautiful sunset, but it came with bugs. This really is a beautiful place and must have been so sad for our ancestors to have to leave their homes here.

We spent the night in the Nauvoo State Park Campground. In the morning we drove out to the Old Nauvoo Burial Ground. It is very peaceful out there and we were alone except for one small group who joined us for part of the time. Very few of the graves are identified, and many of the existing stones are broken, but there is a Gazebo with all the names. David Garlick died in Nauvoo and his name is on the monument. We were surprised that this cemetery was out of town as far as it was. They would have had lengthy funeral processions.

We then drove to Carthage to visit the Jail and Visitor’s Center there, before heading further east.

Obituary and Will of Samuel Eggleston

I learned interesting things from the Obituary and Will of Samuel Eggleston.

Samuel Eggleston died May 26, 1884 in Ogden, Utah. A Notice of his death was printed in the Monday edition of the Ogden Daily Herald.

Newspaper Account of Samuel Eggleston’s Funeral:

Ogden Daily Herald
Obituary Saturday 31, 1884
Samuel Eggleston

A large concourse of relatives and friends assembled in the Second Ward meetinghouse, on the afternoon of May 27th, 1884, to participate in the funeral services over the remains of Elder Samuel Eggleston who departed this life, on the morning of the 26th inst. The services were Conducted by Bishop Robert McQuarrie. The services were opened by the choir singing: “We have met, dear friends and brethren, Our respects to pay to one Who has left this world of sorrow And to glory now has gone.”

Prayer was offered by President C. F. Middleton. The choir sang: “Thou doest not weep to weep alone,” etc. The Bishop then stated that previous to the death of the deceased he had requested that Elders Lorin Farr, and L.J. Herrick, and Apostle F. D. Richards act as speakers at his funeral. Those brethren are all present and would address the meeting.

Elder Lorin Farr was the first speaker. He said that we are reminded by the circumstances that have called us together that this earth and this state of existence are not our permanent condition and abiding-place, but that all must undergo a change. We have been called upon today, to pay our last respects to the mortal remains of our brother, but not our last respects to him, for he still lives and we shall meet him again in another sphere and better condition than we now experience. He then spoke of the object of man coming to the earth, namely to work out a more exceeding weight of glory and exaltation than we otherwise could and said this is the most important age of the world in which the Lord has ever spoken to man on the earth, as it is the dispensation of the fullness of times, when God will gather all things into one and the restitution of all things spoken by the Prophets. The speaker next contrasted the religion of the world with that of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and showed that the latter was the only true order of the Kingdom of God which He has established upon the earth in the last days. This is the Gospel which our brother, whose remains lie before us, had embraced and to which he remained faithful while he lived in this state of existence, he spoke of the great events that are transpiring and of the opposition of mankind to this great work, but it will triumph and God will give the victory to all who maintain their integrity. Our brother was such an one, he held the high Melchisedek Priesthood and magnified it to the end of his life. He has kept his covenants that entitle him to go into the presence of God and to associate with Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Joseph, Hyrum, and others in the spirit world, and can also labor there and preach to the spirits in prison, for he carries with him the keys and the watchword authorizing him to do these things and entitle him to the blessings of associating with his former wife and friends who have gone before him. His mind, in this life, was always engaged in, and contemplating this great work of God. For these reasons his family and friends have little cause to mourn his departure from this life. He will, ere long, return again and if faithful will have the privilege to live and enjoy society here again.

Elder Lester J. Herrick was the next speaker. His failing health prevented him from speaking so loud, or as much as he otherwise could desire. He could endorse all that had been said by Elder Farr upon this subject. He, like many men, believed that if, when we depart, this is the end of man he would be in a miserable condition. But this is not true, for he looked forward to the time when he should again meet and hold converse with Father Eggleston in the future, as he has done in the past; for death is the passport to eternal life. Hence, when he can no longer enjoy life and be no longer useful to his fellow-man here, he does not desire to linger in pain and suffering, but he desires to have his lamp trimmed and burning and ready, when the time of his departure comes for he expects to meet his father, mother, and other friends, and enjoy a good and happy time with them. He had known the deceased from the time he first came here, and spoke of him in the highest term of commendation, both as a man, a citizen, and a servant of God. His place was made with him, he was reconciled to Him, and he died with a feeling of peace towards God and his brethren and sisters, for he has fought the good fight, kept the faith, and has overcome the world, death and the grave, and has entered into eternal life. Elder Herrick reminded the people that it was necessary to observe the things of the present life, to prepare for full enjoyment of the life to come.

Apostle F. D. Richards next addressed the meeting. He had visited the deceased, a short time before his death, and found that, although his voice was weak, his spirit was strong, bright and lively and he could converse on the things of God as freshly and intelligently as he ever did, and thus his faculties remained bright to the last. He then said to the friends of the deceased that there lies before us a rich man; for he is rich in the things of the Kingdom of God. He felt that it was possible that Brother Eggleston could have been kept alive a short time longer, yet his system was worn out and it seemed wisdom in the Lord to take him. He said that the deceased had fought the good fight and kept the faith, and had entered into life. He exhorted the widow and the children to observe the counsels of their husband and father, for this was his special desire before he died. He has gone to prepare a place for you, and if you are faithful you will inherit it with him. The speaker then read a part of the 20th Chapter of Luke, in relation to the question of the Sadducees concerning the woman who had seven husbands in this life but died without issue. “Whose wife shall she be?” The speaker then explained the nature of the resurrection in which it is said there is “neither marrying nor giving in marriage” etc. and showed that this referred to those who heard the Gospel, but refused to obey it here in the flesh, who persecuted the servants and Saints of God and put them to death, that it applied to those who attain to the Telestial glory. They are cut off from marrying or giving in marriage in their resurrection. But there is nothing said in the revelations of God that will debar the righteous from the enjoyment of all these blessings either here, in this life or in the resurrection of the just. Brother Eggleston is one of those who are entitled to the highest glories to which the righteous attain, for he has honored every law of God that has come to his knowledge, as far as he has been able to do so; and if his widow, sons, daughters and other posterity are faithful they will enjoy these blessings and honors with him at the coming of the Son of God and will still go forward, increasing in the knowledge of the things of the Celestial Kingdom of God. He referred to the abundance of heavenly blessings bestowed upon the Church in our day, the existence of two Temples in which the people may labor for their eternal interests of the living and of their dead, with another nearing completion. How lavishly the Lord bestows his favor upon his people in multiplying his great blessings upon us, in giving us as many of the ordinances which tend to our exaltation if rightly appreciated and to our increase of knowledge and understanding in all His statutes, ordinances and judgements. He closed by exhorting the Saints to be faithful in all things, that they may be partakers of these great blessings.

Bishop Robert McQuarrie said we had just parted with a good, kind and faithful man. He was blessed of the Lord, was spiritually-minded, and blessed with the visions of the Lord to a great degree. He was a good counselor, while united with the speaker and the other counselor. There were never any jars or discords between them, but they always labored together in harmony and in peace for the building up of the Kingdom of God in the Ward over which they had the watchcare.

The choir sang a funeral hymn: “Brother, thou art gone before us.”The services closed by benediction by President L. W. Shurtliff, after which the remains were conveyed to the cemetery and consigned to rest.

Obituary

The deceased, Samuel Eggleston, was the son of Samuel and Elizabeth H. Eggleston. He was born at Marcellus, New York, March 30th, 1801. [1804] In 1817, he moved with his father, and family to Springwater, in the same State. When 19 years old, he left home and went to Sempronius and took up his abode with Thomas Marsh, his brother-in-law, with whom he remained four years. On the 23rd of August, 1827, he was married to Miss Lurania P. Burgess by Mr. Gordon, a Baptist minister, to whose church he then belonged. He had previously belonged to the Close Communion Baptists. He subsequently joined the Freewill Baptists. He became dissatisfied with them and held himself aloof from Christian institutions for a long time. On the 6th of June,1841 he was baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints by Elder Pelatiah Brown. On the 18th day of July following, he was ordained a Teacher by Dr. Willard Richards. In July, 1842, he removed with his family to Nauvoo. In October, 1844, he was ordained a member of the 9th Quorum of Seventies. Brother Eggleston and family remained at Nauvoo till the year 1846, when he shared in the exodus from that city. He went to Winter Quarters and stayed there till 1848 when he moved back to the east side of the Missouri River. In the spring of 1851, he went to Council Bluffs, Iowa. While in the latter State he was Justice of the Peace for ten years, Notary Public for nine years, and Deputy Postmaster for five years. In 1862, he came to Utah, settling in Ogden. In 1863, he was ordained a high Priest by F. A. Hammond and others. On May 30, 1877, he was set apart as First Counselor to Robert McQuarrie, Bishop of the Second Ward of this city, which position he held until he died. On the 24th of October, 1882, he was ordained a Patriarch under the hands of President George Q. Cannon and others. The deceased Patriarch leaves four children, living (four having died); and twenty-seven grandchildren, (eleven more being dead) to build up his house and perpetuate his name in Israel. Peace to his ashes.

Will of Samuel Eggleston

Samuel left a will written April 27, 1884, just a month before his death (Transcribed below):

In the Name of God Amen
I Samuel Eggleston of Ogden City in the County of Weber and the Territory of Utah, of the age of eighty six years and being of sound and disposing mind and memory, and not acting under duress, [ ] fraudulent misrepresentation or undue influence of any person whatever, do make publish and declare this my Last Will and Testament, in manner following
That is to Say
First, I give and bequeath to my son, Edwin Eggleston who resides at Council Bluffs, in the State of Iowa the sum of ten (10) Dollars to be paid from the sale of any estate.
Secondly, I give and bequeath to my daughter Mary Elizabeth Farr, wife of Enoch Farr, the feather bed now used by me, and which was used by her mother during her lifetime.
Thirdly, I give and bequeath to my wife Katherine Eggleston, absolutely, all the personal property of every kind and nature, owned by me at the time of my death.
Fourthly, wishing to provide for the support and maintenance of my beloved wife Katherine Eggleston as long as she may live, and in a suitable a manner as the condition of my estate will provide. I give and devise to my said wife for her separate sole use and benefit so long as she may live, the use occupancy and control of all of my real estate of every name and nature whatsoever, owned by me at the time of my death and all rents, issues and profits, which may arise therefrom during her lifetime.
Fiftly, At the death of my said wife, Katherine Eggleston, I give and devise to my sons Reuben B. Eggleston, Orson H. Eggleston and to my daughter Mary Elizabeth Farr, wife of Enoch Farr, all the real estate of every name and nature whatsoever, owned by me at the time of my death, to be divided equally between them, share and share alike.
Lastly, I hereby enumerate and appoint my wife, Katherine Eggleston, of Ogden City aforesaid, the Executrix of this my Last Will and Testament, and hereby revoke all former Wills by me made.
In Witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal, this Twenty Seventh day of April in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and eighty four.
Samuel Eggleston

The foregoing instrument, consisting of one page, besides this, was at the date hereof by the said Samuel Eggleston signed and sealed and published as, and declared to be his last Will and Testament, in presence of us, who at his request, and in his presence, in the presence of each other, have subscribed and signed as witnesses thereto.
Robert McQuarrie
Residing at Ogden City, in Weber County, Utah Territory
John Harris
Residing at Ogden City in Weber County, Utah Territory

The Official Probate Packet is rather large, containing several documents. It lists heirs as Samuel’s widow, Katherine Eggleston, children Edwin Eggleston, age 50 of Council Bluffs, Iowa, Mary Farr, age 35, wife of Enoch Farr, of Ogden, Utah, Reuben B. Eggleston, age 52 of Ogden, Utah and Orson H. Eggleston, age 43 of Eden, Utah. Katherine was 49 years old and the petitioner.

Samuel’s Estate

The Probate Record describes Samuel’s property as:

A part of Lot 3 in Block 20 in Plat A of Ogden city Survey in said Weber County, bounded as bollows: Beginning at a point 40 feet West of the South East corner of said Lot, and running thence West 52 feet, thence North 20 rods, thence East 52 feet, thence South 20 rods to the place of beginning – the homestead of the deceased, with house and improvements hereon, valued at about $1000.00. Sundry household goods and effects valued at about $50.00.

The property was later appraised and valued at $800, plus the $50 personal property. A Notice to Creditors which was published after Samuel’s death placed this property on the north side of Sixth Street (now 26th St.), between Franklin and Wall Streets. Franklin is now Lincoln Ave., so his home would have been on the north side of 26th St. between Lincoln and Wall Ave.

Catherine was executrix of Samuel’s will and the provisions in the will were for her to remain in their home as long as she lived. Upon her death in 1888, Reuben petitioned the Court to administer the estate. The property was appraised again and  valued at $2000 on June 27, 1889.

The household goods which were given to Catherine after Samuel’s death became part of her estate. Edwin received his $10 and Mary Farr the feather bed. The real estate was divided equally between Reuben, Orson and Mary.

Trijntjie Catherine Kat Eggleston

Catherine Kat Eggleston has always been somewhat of a mystery to me. It was only recently that I found, through what others have posted to FamilySearch, that her full name was Trijntjie Catherine Kat Eggleston. I found other bits of very intersting information there. She is still somewhat of a mystery, but now a much more intriguing and fascinating mystery.

The Family Bible Record

The first I knew of Catherine was from Orson Hyde Eggleston’s Family Bible. The record there lists 3 wives for Orson’s father Samuel Eggleston. His first wife, and the mother of his children, was Lurania Powers Burgess. The record lists 2 other marriages which both occurred shortly after Lurania’s death in July 1870.

Samuel married Mary Elizabeth Mumford October 24, 1870. She is a total mystery. I have found no other information about her and she seems to have disappeared from Samuel’s life very shortly after this marriage.

Samuel was married to Catherine Kat March 6, 1871 in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City by Daniel H. Wells. Catherine was born April 5th, 1836, making her 35 years old at the time. Samuel was 67.

Other Bits and Pieces

I learned that Catherine was born in Holland on April 5,1836. I assumed that she was a recent immigrant who had come to Utah as a single woman. In the 1880 Census she was 45 years old and living in Ogden, Utah with Samuel, who was 76.

Samuel and Katherine Eggleston in Ogden 2nd Ward Record

I learned her parents names early on in my research. The Ogden 2nd Ward Records list Samuel and Katherine as members. Katherine was baptized April 8, 1868.  (Another record has the date 29 June 1868 in Zaandam, Lammers, Netherlands) The record gave her parents names as Peter Kats and Elizabeth Blue. I also found that she had done Tempe work for them in the Logan Temple.

Learning from Catherine’s Death

I learned much more about Catherine from finding records of her death. Catherine Kat Eggleston died September 8, 1888. The Ogden Standard published the following on September 12, 1888:

Card of Thanks. EDITOR THE STANDARD: With your permission the undersigned would like to express their heartfelt thanks to the many friends of the late Catherine Eggleston for their kindness and assistance during her short and severe illness, and also especially thank the Second Ward choir for their beautiful singing during the funeral services. The kindness shown to her before and after her death will never be forgotten. R. B. EGGLESTON, MRS. MARY E. FARR

Reuben worked for the newspaper, so it is not surprising that he had this printed. It does seem to indicate that Samuel’s children had good feelings toward Catherine. Orson also included in a letter to his father from his Mission, “my respects to Catherine and all the rest.”

According to the terms of his Will, Samuel had left Katherine all of his personal property, with his land to go to his children Reuben, Orson and Mary, after Catherine’s death. Samuel wished to “provide for the support and maintenance of my beloved wife Katherine Eggleston as long as she may live, and in a suitable manner as the condition of my estate will provide.” She was allowed to occupy and control his real estate, including benefiting from rents and profits. She may have rented out rooms in the house.

Upon Catherine’s death, Thomas Doxey and Warren G. Child were made administrators of her estate. A Notice to Creditors was published in the newspaper in November and December 1888, by Thomas Doxey. The personal property was inventoried and sold at auction. Her estate was settled in the Probate Court of Weber County April 21, 1890. Final distribution to heirs-at-law was set for Saturday the 17th day of May, 1890.

Catherine’s Family

I learned the names of Catherine’s siblings from her probate record. Heirs listed in the probate record included brothers John [Jan] Kat of Velzen, Holland; Herman [Hermanus] Kat of Wormeveer, Holland; Henrika Kat Koelevaart, wife of John Koelevaart; and children of her deceased sister Angie Kat de Ruyter, including Semelia Jacoba, Elizbeth and Anna Catharine de Ruyter, all of Amsterdam, Holland. These heirs conveyed their rights and interest in the estate to Ida Zitzman, a widowed immigrant from Holland, who lived in Katherine’s ward with her six children.

Catherine’s Final Resting Place?

The Ogden City Cemetery Records show Lurania buried in Lot B-2-30 1E; Samuel in B 2-30 2E; and “Adult Mound” B 2-30-3E. There is nothing in the record to indicate who was buried in this third plot. Orson Eggleston bought a 10 plot Lot in the Cemetery, probably at the time his mother or first child died. It appears that they were not all used, and the rest later sold to others, as Orson moved to Afton, Wyoming and his family were buried elsewhere. It is likely that Catherine was buried next to Samuel in this other plot. Catherine had no children, so Samuel’s family may have buried her there, but never placed a marker. We may never know for sure, who is in this “Adult Mound”, but there have been no other records found to indicate that Catherine was buried anywhere else.

Recent Discoveries

This was all I knew of Catherine for some time, and I thought this was all I might ever know. But we now live in a digital age with many more people interested in genealogy. I recently found on FamilySearch, not only Catherine’s full name, but also her entire family and hints of her previous life in Holland.

Catherine was born Trintjie Catherine Kat, the daughter of Pieter Kat and Lijsbet Blaauw (The Dutch spellings of Peter Kat and Elizabeth Blue). Catherine married Peter Fontijin on November 3, 1861 in Zaandam, Netherlands. Peter had previously been married Geertjie Muntjewerff, who died July 7, 1861. They had six children, though one died as in infant and 3 others died in January 1862. So Catherine at 25 years of age, became instant Step-mother to five very young children and then buried 3 of them just months later.

Peter and Catherine were baptized members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in April 1868. Peter, along with other members of his family, was excommunicated shortly after being baptized.

It would seem that Catherine and Peter divorced at some point, though I haven’t found a record of a divorce. It could have happened before Catherine came to America. Or possibly she came with the expectation that he would follow soon after and he changed his mind.

Catherine sailed for America August 25, 1869 on the ship Minnesota with Jantje, age 7 and Cornelia Fontijin, age 6, Peter’s surviving children from his first marriage. There were 443 Immigrating Saints on this ship. They arrived in New York September 6, 1969. They then traveled by train to Ogden, arriving there September 16, 1869. An obituary of Jantje – Jeanette F. Dartnell – indicated that this was the first passenger train to arrive in Ogden.

What Happened to Peter Fontijin

Peter married a third time to Henedricka von Elburg July 30, 1876 in Amsterdam. Peter was re-baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints June 17, 1876. Hendericka, who was then listed as a widow, was baptized on June 20, 1876, shortly before their marriage. Peter and his wife, known later as Harriet, came to Utah in 1877. They lived in Salt Lake City. Harriet was an ordained preacher of spiritualism, and apparently held seances. Peter died March 27, 1905 in Salt Lake City. It appears that even though he was re-baptized into the L. D. S. Church, he did not remain a faithful member, but joined his wife in spiritualism. Possibly his re-baptism was in part to be able to immigrate to America with L.D.S. Church immigration.

Questions

Catherine came to Utah with two young children. The ages given on the immigration record do not match with the birth records of the daughters of Peter and Geertjie. They should have been a little older – 10 and 12 years old, as indicated not only by their birth dates, but by the length of residence in Salt Lake City when they died. It is possible that preparations for immigration were begun years earlier and those ages for the children remained on the records. Catherine’s age of 36 at the time of immigration is also incorrect, though it is a few years older than she was.

I have not been able to find Catherine or these girls on the 1870 Census, so that early time in Utah is a mystery. Cornelia/Nellie was married in 1876 and Jantjie/Jeanette in 1882 in Salt Lake City.

Did Catherine care for these girls until her marriage to Samuel? Were they all living together after Catherine was married? We do not know for sure where Catherine was living before she married Samuel. It would seem more likely that they became acquainted in Ogden, rather than Salt Lake City.

If these girls were not with Catherine, as seems the case, then who were they with? Did Catherine bring the girls to live with someone else in Salt Lake City? They were too young to be on their own, so must have lived with someone for those first years. They could have joined their father when he immigrated in 1877.

Peter and his daughters all lived in Salt Lake City for the rest of their lives. Obituaries for Cornelia/Nellie Heystek’s says that she resided in Salt Lake City since she came to Utah. One says that she came to Utah with her sister at age 10. Jeanette’s death certificate indicates she lived in Salt Lake City for 77 years, which would date back to their 1869 immigration. Nellie’s says she was a resident for 61 years when she died in 1929.

These girls were very young when their father married Catherine, so she would have been the only mother they ever knew. Yet, they were not listed as heirs in Catherine’s probate record. Records of these girls show no connection at all to Catherine, as if she was just someone with the same surname who immigrated on the same ship or possibly someone hired to escort them to America. So though we have a little more history, Catherine remains somewhat of a mystery.

A Note on Name Spelling

I have seen her name spelled Catherine, Catherina, and Katherine on different records. The papers in Samuel Eggleston’s probate record have her name spelled Katherine. Samuel spelled it that way in his will. In the signature space on the probate papers however, it shows it was signed with X – her mark. So Catherine was likely illiterate herself and others spelled her name as they felt it should be.

Samuel Eggleston Utah Pioneer

Samuel Eggleston

Early Life of Samuel Eggleston in New York

Samuel Eggleston, son of Samuel & Elizabeth Hill Eggleston was born March 30, 1804 in Marcellus, Onondaga County, New York. He wrote a brief autobiography which states:

“I lived in the town of Marcellus until I was 13 years old, then my father, with his family, then moved into the town of Springwater, Livingston County, state of New York. My brothers and sisters numbered ten in family. I lived with my father until I was 19 years old, then I went to live with my brother-in-law to learn the tanner’s trade. I lived with them until I was 23 years old . . .”

Samuel’s father came to Marcellus in the early 1800’s with his parents and other family members. He bought a piece of land bordering Skaneateles Lake. He sold this land in 1817 which was the time that the family moved to Springwater.

Samuel’s mother, Elizabeth Hill Eggleston, also known as Betsy, died in 1823 in Springwater. Some of the children were still quite young at the time of her death. Samuel was about 19 years old. It was around this time that Samuel went back to the area where he had grown up. His older sister Lucy had married Thomas Marsh and they were living in Sempronius, across the lake from Marcellus. Samuel’s obituary indicates that it was Thomas Marsh with whom he lived for 4 years, from age 19 to 23. He learned the tanner’s trade from Thomas Marsh.

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