Gallery of Mom’s Art: Paintings

I don’t know when my mother’s interest in art began, though I suspect it was pretty early in her life. I just remember it filling her life from the time I can first remember. Twenty years after her death, we cleaned out the house and moved my father in with my brother. In that process we distributed much of her art work. This post will focus on paintings, with others to follow for other mediums.

This is by no means a complete gallery of Mom’s art. During her life she gave many paintings away. I hope they are still being enjoyed as much as we enjoy these.

Childhood Paintings

In the drawer of the cedar chest we found some small canvases with what appear to be very early, even childhood paintings.

College Art Student

My mother, Joan Wheelwright, attended Weber College in Ogden, Utah as an Art Major. At that time Weber was a Two Year Junior College. Her education refined her natural talent. She created a number of works at Weber College and had some exhibited.

This painting hung in my Grandparents’ house from my earliest memories until after Grandpa’s death. It is signed Joan Wheelwright. It was probably painted when she was in College.

This painting is also signed Joan Wheelwright, so is an early work. It had been given to a neighbor when Mom was still living at home. This neighbor’s grandson found it when he moved into the house and felt it should be returned to family. He gave it to my cousin who had bought our Grandparents’ home after Grandpa died. She then gave it to me. It It was not in very good shape – some warping and water damage. I had it reframed and now it hangs in my home.

Though no signature is visible, this also appears to be an early painting.
This is one of several unframed water colors we found in the drawer of the cedar chest. This one is signed Joan Wheelwright, so likely done in College.
This one also appears to be signed John Wheelwright

Early Paintings

These other unsigned and unframed water colors appear to be early paintings. They were found in the cedar chest and other places around the house.

Portraits were something that Mom didn’t really paint, so finding this was kind of a surprise. Possibly it was done as an assignment in College?
This one has a smudge in the corner which may be a signature, though it doesn’t resemble hers. It might be someone else’s work, but I have no idea why she would have kept it if it wasn’t hers.

Other Early Paintings

Mom and Dad married in 1951, just before Mom turned 20 years old. These paintings are signed Joan W. Eggleston, so done after their marriage, but probably when she was still young.

I remember this painting hanging in the house forever. My siblings and I still wonder what the dark thing on the right is supposed to be.

Landscapes in Oil and Acrylic

Through the years, Mom painted many landscapes. I remember camping trips where we kids would be running around exploring while Mom sat and painted the scenery. At some point she started using a pallet knife to get more texture. Earlier landscapes were desert scenes or ones with fall colors.

This one was given to my sister. It has been newly reframed after the frame fell apart.

This is a really small painting in a frame that Mom covered with gold leaf.
This one is also small.

These were probably the last acrylic paintings Mom did. In her later years she went back to water colors. The three small paintings hung over Mom and Dad’s King size bed.

Seascapes

Mom gave this painting to her brother Bob for his birthday in 1967.
This large seascape was painted to hang over the fireplace.

Flower Paintings

Mom painted many flowers – some oil or acrylic, and in her later years all water colors, including the one at the beginning of this post.

This one hung in my room when I lived at home.
This is an unframed one that we found in the house.
This was the first painting that I specifically asked for. The photograph doesn’t do it justice. It is in an amazing antique frame that appears to need some repair.
This is the one that there was almost a fight over. The colors look better in person.

Water Color Landscapes

Besides flowers, Mom did several water color landscapes. After she redecorated with blue, she painted and matted most of these to match the color scheme.

A Few Small Still Life Paintings

This small simple still life is unframed

To Be Continued

We found this unfinished painting and wondered what to do with it. Fortunately, there are several artists among Mom’s posterity. One grandson stepped up and offered to take and finish it. We will have to see how it turns out.

Note: Most of these photographs were taken to send to family members so they could choose which painting they wanted. Unfortunately, I didn’t think ahead to doing something like this, so the quality of the photos is not great.

Shift to Blue – The Story of Mom’s Art Journey

My Mom was an artist. She had a gift, one which some of her posterity have inherited to some degree or another – I much less than others. Part of her gift was an eye for color. Where I might see merely brown, she could distinguish the subtle variations and hues, and blend to make new shades. Her art went through many phases and multiple mediums through the years. She liked to take art classes through community education and even taught some herself. I remember her painting, making pottery and jewelry, drying and arranging flowers, and making porcelain dolls with intricate clothing. She was also an expert seamstress and quilter, her eye for matching and combining colors evident there as well.

My early childhood memories seem to be in black and white, perhaps because all the photos were. I do have early memories of turquoise, popular in appliances of the day which were in our kitchen, but also used in glazes and the real turquoise jewelry Mom created.

New House

When I was 12, we moved to a new house which gave Mom the opportunity to decorate from scratch. The “quality industrial grade” carpet picked out for the whole house, which remained in two upstairs bedrooms until the house was sold because it never wore out, was a blend of browns and orange. Those are the colors I remember for years filling our home and Mom’s art. Mom’s earliest paintings were with oils and then acrylic, some of those being fall or desert scenes typical of southern Utah. Her paintings, along with some from other artists, covered our walls like a gallery.

I remember this painting hanging in our house for years, then Mom donated it to be hung in the new Church. After many years it was found in a closet at the Church and returned to Dad. It has now made its way to my home.

The first painting to break the color mold, was a large seascape that was placed over the fireplace. Even it had a good deal of brown in the rocks on the shore, but the look was the first of the blue.

The Shift from Orange to Blue

Because it happened after I was married and immersed in my own life and family, I do not recall exactly when or how came the shift from orange to blue. With more money for remodeling and redecorating, Mom and Dad replaced the tan wood siding on the exterior with blue vinyl. With new off-white carpeting in the living room, Mom stenciled a blue design as a border on the walls. They put blue carpet in the master bedroom and Mom made curtains and a beautiful blue quilt to cover the bed. Blue wallpaper replaced the orange in the kitchen and bathrooms. When the younger children moved out, the largest bedroom downstairs became Mom’s Blue Room. It was intended to be a TV room, but after Mom passed away, Dad didn’t spend much time there. It was always Mom’s room, and always blue. A curio cabinet housed her dolls, those she had collected for years and the many porcelain dolls she had made. A collage of prints she acquired on trips covered the wall.

The shift to blue was accompanied by a change of medium as well. Mom turned to water colors, painting delicate flowers and winter scenes to replace the autumn ones. One of the now empty upstairs bedrooms became her studio. As her health worsened and became an excuse for not doing many things, she still found energy to paint.

Blue painting sitting on the old orange and brown carpet in the bedroom that became her studio.

Blue to the End

When we met with funeral directors after Mom’s death, they offered to get a nice casket spray of red roses. No! Though red roses are beautiful and this was a nice gesture, that was not right. We went to a florist and ordered one of delicate blue and white flowers. The shift to blue complete.

Stories about the Stuff

Almost five years ago I wrote a blog post about stuff – stuff with meaning, specifically family heirlooms, along with stuff without meaning, and decisions about what to do with it all. In the years since, I have had the task of going through the stuff of three individuals, deciding with others who should take what, what to toss, and what to give away. Now that the stuff has been disbursed or disposed of, I am feeling a need to record and share the stories about the stuff. But first the stories about distributing the stuff. . .

My Three Adventures in Distributing Stuff

The decisions about what to toss and what to take are complicated by the closeness of the relationships with the previous owners of the stuff, as well as by the relationships with the other people who are involved with deciding. My first experience was going through my brother’s storage unit after he was placed in a care center. Not being too attached to his stuff, I looked more at usefulness with most of it. We had a garage sale, which I vowed would be my last. I took some useful items that didn’t sell and a few I just liked. Other family members took some things. We donated most of the rest to thrift shops. I ended up with a bin of personal items and a file box of his records that I felt responsible to hold on to, just in case he might need them.

Dispersing my mother-in-law’s stuff was a little contentious in the beginning, with some eyes on the monetary value of things. Eventually however, we all just wanted to get it gone. I took less of useful things, and more of the things that I just liked. One surprise with this endeavor was the question of what to do with the stuff from the deceased steps – her husbands’ (my husband’s step fathers – yes, two of them), the last husband’s previous wife (who actually had some lovely things I took, but also other family history type stuff no one wanted) and that husband’s wife’s deceased only son. Look forward to more on this complicated stuff in another post.

The last adventure was with my Father’s stuff, which included my family’s heirlooms and stuff. At age 94, we finally convinced Dad to move in with my brother and sell the house – the house he had built and lived in for almost 55 years. Yes, there was lots of stuff. Because we moved him first and had him pack up what he wanted and thought he would need, we didn’t feel much urgency with this. The problem was that it drug on for weeks, even months, of Saturday visits to the house, with him included. Dad kept finding more stuff to take to my brothers, and unfortunately for me, I managed to take another box or two of random stuff back to my house after each trip.

Tossing Stuff

I always thought tossing stuff would be easy for my kids and their cousins, but we found it otherwise with their Grandma’s stuff. We got a big dumpster and some of us started tossing stuff in. There was really a lot of plain garbage in the house, or so we had determined. What ended up happening was some serious dumpster diving. Family members were pulling treasures out of the dumpster almost as fast as others were tossing in, validating the saying “one person’s trash is another person’s treasure.”

With my Dad’s disbursement taking so long and I being the one living closest to his home, I had the weekly task of filling up the garbage cans and putting them out to be picked up. It seemed rather never-ending at some points, with the cans being filled up right after being dumped and more bags full and waiting for the next week. Even the recycle bin filled up quickly with all the small boxes Dad had saved (not really big enough to haul stuff away in, but saved for wrapping gifts), plastic containers (that had been reused) and bottles that served as water storage. After weeks of this, we started filling up truck beds and making weekly trips to the dump. Those included the 50 year old wheat and food storage no one dared to take, along with building materials and spare parts for everything.

Dividing up Family Heirlooms

My Dad tried to give away some of family heirlooms earlier, but somehow no one wanted to take anything out from under him leaving gaping holes on his walls and in the rooms he lived in. Some things had names put on them from when he had told his grandkids to do this at his 90th Birthday. There were other things that one or another of us had put dibs on or he had promised to us. I will have to share the stories of this meaningful stuff in separate posts.

I have a really hard time with meaningful stuff like family heirlooms being given away or sold to strangers. My tendency is to take what others don’t just so it stays in the family. I took more of that stuff than I intended because somebody had to keep them in the family, right?

As the designated Family Historian, I was tasked with going through the boxes of certificates, old letters, journals, unidentified photographs, and Mom’s youthful scrapbook full of ticket stubs, old programs and commemorative paper napkins. I did some tossing as I went through, with lots of scanning to digitize the memories, without having to keep all the stuff.

family heirloom books
Just a few of the many shelves of books in Dad’s house

Dad had a library that seemed to go on and on, with many old, rare books. I ended up with more that I had space for so I ended up taking home a small bookcase which I immediately filled up. Mom was an artist, so the house was filled with her art work. Dad wanted every one of his children and grandchildren to have a painting. I think we eventually fulfilled that.

I attempted to keep with my hoarding-resistant pattern of getting rid of something when I acquire something new. This worked well with some pieces of heirloom furniture which replaced some things I donated to charity. I was amazed though at how a box full of random small stuff could so easily fit into my drawers and closets and on shelves – kind of like sand filling in the spaces between rocks in a jar.

To Sell and Not Really Make Money

We went through Dad’s house in winter, so rather than one big estate sale, we posted things online and ended up with several min-estate sales. At least we were able to keep going through cupboards and closets while waiting for the people who said they were interested in furniture, but never came. We had a few productive sale days. What was satisfying to me was sending items off with someone who I felt would give them a good home, either because they really needed something or because they loved those things.

One day someone who was interested in a family heirloom that no one in the family had a place for, showed up with two other women. They ended up going through the whole house and bought many things, including that heirloom cupboard which was quite a feat to get up the stairs and into their truck. This woman loved this cupboard and I shared the story of it with her. It had been in my Grandparent’s house in Jackson Hole where Grandpa homesteaded. In talking we found out that she knows a cousin well, one whose own father was born at that house in Jackson. She later sent me a picture of the cupboard in her house, all decorated for Christmas.

family heirloom cupboard
Family heirloom cupboard that ended up looking so much better here in its new home than it did in Dad’s basement.

Giving Away Stuff and Memories

I felt good about other items finding good homes. There was a soup tureen from Mom’s stoneware set that was left in the house when she had given my brother the set. I sold the set to a friend when going through his stuff. She was excited to get the whole set. Then I gave her the tureen just in time to use for Thanksgiving dinner. We were able to find a good home for my brother’s large aquarium with a local non-profit. I took a whole carload of my mother-in-laws suits to the local women’s shelter.

Mom and Dad had made porcelain figurines for years and often gave them for gifts. They made good Christmas gifts, as did the books, movies and CD’s that went to a Veteran’s home. Blankets were given to those in need. I took a case of soap to a homeless shelter. Some things we just offered to whoever would haul them away. Because we were doing my Dad’s house during COVID, it was a challenge donating to thrift stores. We had to make appointmentsm, so tried to maximize with as much as we could take at a time.

Finally Dad’s house was empty, but there was still stuff in sheds in the yard when we put it up for sale. The people who quickly bought the house are now the new owners of some of that stuff. Sometimes leaving stuff behind is all you can do.

1870 Smallpox Epidemic in Ogden, Utah

The Death of Lurania Eggleston

Lurania Powers Burgess Eggleston

I had known from family records that Lurania Powers Burgess Eggleston, the wife of Samuel Eggleston and my great great grandmother, had died July 6, 1870. This date is on her headstone in the Ogden City Cemetery. The circumstances of her death took some time for me to unravel and understand.

A notice in The Ogden Semi-Weekly Junction of Wednesday Morning July 6, 1870, stated:

“Died. In this city, of scarlet fever, at 3 o’clock this morning, LURANIA P., wife of Mr. SAMUEL EGGLESTON, aged 61 years and 11 months. The funeral will take place a 5 o’clock this evening, when the friends of the deceased are invited to attend. Mrs. Eggleston was born in Cayuga County, New York. She was baptized in June 1841, moved to Nauvoo in 1842. In 1847, she went with her family to Winter Quarters and in 1862 she came to Utah.”


The Ogden Semi-Weekly Junction 6 July 1870

This seemed pretty straight forward, that Lurania had gotten sick and passed away. It was not unusual at the time to bury someone quickly after their death. This newspaper was a semi-weekly paper, being published on Wednesdays and Saturdays. At that time, Lurania’s sons Reuben and Orson would have been working for the paper. I assume they rushed word soon after her death and had the notice written shortly before the paper was printed that day. Perhaps they actually went in and typeset it themselves.

At some point, I visited the Ogden City Cemetery and stopped in the office to see the Sexton Records. The sexton record indicated the cause of Lurania’s death as smallpox. This was different from the “scarlet fever” stated in the paper. Of course, the family may have been unsure of exactly what disease she had and reported what they thought. The other option might have been that they and/or doctors realized it was smallpox but intentionally did not want to alarm the public.

More Deaths in the Family

I remember learning that Orson had purchased cemetery plots at that time. Also listed in the sexton records were the death of two of Reuben’s children during that same summer. Four year old Cora Gladys died July 26 and seven year old May Julia on August 6, 1870. The cause of death was given as smallpox for one and the other was blank on the record.

I found a biography of Emeline Eggleston, wife of Reuben, written by Disey Eggleston Richardson in the DUP files. This mentioned that two of Reuben and Emeline’s children, Cora Gladys and May Julia were stricken with black small pox in 1870. It added that they were quarantined at Farr’s grove, as were others who were exposed. These two girls could have been easily infected by their grandmother.

In a Biography of William Nicol Fife, I found information about the Smallpox epidemic in 1870. According to his account the disease was brought into Ogden by an Indian Squaw in May 1870. He indicated that “the first person taken down with it, a Mrs. Eggleston died.” Later a few others became sick and were sent to Brick Creek [Burch Creek].

Mr. Fife indicated that he personally built a lumber room for the afflicted and furnished them with food and necessities. He also “followed up the disease with disinfectants” and personally placed yellow flags in front of every affected house. By July, forty cases were quarantined at Farr’s Grove. He indicated that the Mayor assisted him with this and later became sick himself. His case was mild, yet he was also moved to the grove. By the end of July there were 89 cases.

Quarantine Sites

There were two quarantine sites set up during 1870, both of which have connections to the Eggleston Family. Farr’s Grove was land owned by the Farr family near the mouth of Ogden Canyon and not far from where I grew up. Samuel and Lurania’s daughter, Mary Elizabeth, had married Enoch Farr, a son of Lorin Farr. This was his family’s land. I remember the orchards that were still there during my childhood. Created on this land was Lorin Farr Park, which is very familiar to me and everyone around. The swimming pool there was even made famous through the movie “The Sandlot.”

The other quarantine site was Burch Creek, which is actually the neighborhood where I have lived for the past 40 years. Before our marriage, my husband lived in the basement of his Aunt and Uncle’s home which has Burch Creek running through their back yard. Our home is a couple of blocks away. This area was originally settled by John Stephens, the father of Constance Stephens who was Orson Eggleston’s first wife.

Care of the Sick

Though Mr. Fife mentioned building a lumber room at Farr’s Grove, this quarantine may have consisted mostly of tents being set up with some medical people there to care for the sick. The locations suggest that the main idea was to get these people away from the general population and public places where people might gather. At that time, these places were outside of “town.” Mr. Fife stated:


“[I] got good kind nurses for the sick, and by strict regulations in the camp and the city the contagion was prevented from spreading any further. About half the people in camp I furnished with supplies from Z.C.M.I. at the expense of the city. A great portion of the time I was on the move day and night, and though handling most of the sick people in taking them to the grove, I was not attacked by the disease.”

Autobiography of Wiliam Nicole Fife cited in Orson F. Whitney, History of Utah, Vol 4, p. 163, Utah , Salt Lake City, Utah: Genealogical Society of Utah 1998 (Geo. Q. Cannon & Sons, 1904)

I learned by scanning through microfilm of the 1870 Ogden Junction, that this epidemic afflicted Ogden and the surrounding area for much of the year. Having the quarantine site on their land was not good for the Stephen’s family, having afflicted sixteen of them, according to Mr. Fife. John Stephens died Dec 3, 1870 at his residence near Burch Creek of smallpox.


The Ogden Semi-Weekly Junction,
3 December 1870

End of the Smallpox Epidemic?

An article in The Ogden Semi-Weekly Junction of December 14, 1870 stated:

Burch Creek–

The small pox at Burch Creek has, up to date, attacked sixteen persons, all members of the Stephens family. “Doctor” Ryle who has them in charge, pronounces them all, with the exception of Father Stephens whose death was announced last wee, in a state of convalescence, and expects that in a few days they will have entirely recovered.


The Ogden Semi-Weekly Junction, 14 December 1870

These accounts have some conflicts about the timing of this epidemic. Mr. Fife indicated the beginning of this epidemic as May, suggesting that Mrs. Eggleston would have died earlier than her July 6 death date. People would have been people quarantined by the time of her death, according to Fife’s account, so it would seem they would have known what Lurania died of, and she should have been quarantined as well.

Mr. Fife indicated that “ Only seven of the 89 cases were fatal and the epidemic was over by the end of October,” which doesn’t fit with the newspaper accounts that John Stephens died in December and his family members were still recovering. Of course, these accounts are based on the recollections of individuals.

If the numbers reported are correct – 89 people became sick, 16 of those were members of the Stephens family; and 7 died, including Lurania, Cora Gladys, May Julia and John Stephens. With four of the seven deaths being connected to the family, I wonder how many other family members got sick but recovered.

Uncle Howard Cheney Was a Doughboy

Joseph Howard Cheney
Joseph Howard Cheney in his World War I Uniform

I have always thought this a great photo. It is only after doing some research into the military service of Howard Cheney, that I can appreciate the proud, though somewhat terrified look as he stands at attention in his uniform.

Joseph Howard Cheney

Joseph Howard Cheney, was my grandmother’s brother, making him my Great Uncle. I have come to see him as Great in another way. He was born in Jackson Hole, Wyoming on June 20, 1891, the fifth child and fourth son of Selar Cheney and Mary Alice Wilson. His childhood in Jackson Hole was probably adventurous, but could it possibly have prepared him for what was to come?

Howard, as he was called, was a young man as World War I raged across the ocean. The United States was slow to join her allies in this War, waiting and watching until officially declaring War on April 6, 1917. Howard likely read available newspapers accounts and maybe thought about this War as he worked on his ranch.

The first U.S. Draft began in June 1917 and Howard was one of the first to register on June 5, 1917. He was 25 years old. On his registration card he indicated that he had no disability or exception to service.

Private Joseph Howard Cheney

Howard enlisted on May 24, 1918. He was sent to Camp Lewis in American Lake, Washington for training. Having been to this very place earlier this year, I can picture that. Camp Lewis has now morphed into Joint Base Lewis McChord, where my son-in-law was stationed.

Howard served as a Private in Battery A 145th Field Artillery 40 Division. On August 5, 1918, he sailed on the ship Scotian from New York City to France. Unfortunately, there are few available details about his service other than that he served in France until the end of the War. Just knowing about the horrors of this war and the devastation caused to France, we can assume that it was a frightening and horrible experience. Howard was not wounded, though one must wonder if he carried home unseen wounds.

The Armistice was signed on November 11, 1918, ending this Great War. Howard left Bordeaux, France on December 23rd and arrived in Hoboken, New Jersey on January 5, 1919. He was discharged January 24, 1919 at Logan, Utah.

Article in Jackson’s Hole Courier
30 January 1919

Return to the Ranch in Jackson Hole

Howard returned to Jackson Hole January 26, 1919 and resumed ranching. He married Pearl Estella Mangum November 7, 1923. They had five children and raised four to adulthood. Howard farmed and fed his family through the Great Depression.

Howard with his children

With the entry of the United States into another World War, Howard again dutifully registered for the Draft. He was then 50 years old.

Howard died on the eve of Independence Day, July 3, 1949 in Brigham City, Utah at the relatively young age of 58.

Joseph Howard Cheney
Howard and Pearl in Brigham City

After his death, Howard’s wife Pearl applied for a Military Headstone for his grave. She was living in Brigham City, Utah at the time of the application, July 3, 1951. She had the stone marker shipped to her son-in-law Keith Shinkle of Victor, Idaho to the Wilson, Wyoming Post Office, which was on the other side of Teton Pass. This granite marker was placed on Howard’s grave in the South Park Cemetery, in Jackson, Wyoming.

Joseph Howard Cheney
Joseph H Cheney Headstone
South Park Cemetery, Jackson, Wyoming

Eggleston Family Members in Marcellus Baptist Church Records Part 4 1825 and later

The old church records that my father and I found at the Rose Hill/Thorn Hill Baptist Church on our visit in 2001, proved to be a wealth of information about our Eggleston family. The Articles of Faith and Covenant, along with church membership lists are in a previous post. The first excerpts of entries pertaining to Eggleston family members from the beginnings of the church in 1807 until 1811 are in Part 1. Part 2 covers entries from 1812 to 1816. Part 3 continues with 1816 to 1819. This post, Part 4 includes entries from 1825 and later.

1825

Nathan Eggleston began to have difficulties with the church in 1825.

Aug 13 1825
Voted that Dea Nathan Thompson and Br. Ebenezer Edwards be a committee to visit Brother Nathan Eagleston learn the state of his mind and report his case at our next church meeting. .

Nathan Eggleston’s case was resolved rather quickly, or at least the church did not spend much time in labor with him. Fellowship was withdrawn by vote on September 10, 1825.

Monthly Church meeting Sept 10th 1825
Dea N. Thompson and Br. E. Edwards reported that they had visited Br. Nathan Eagleston and that they found him in a very cold (dead) state of mind and that he had no desire to travail with the church and that he refused to attend this church meeting when requested so to do and further that he believed it the duty of the Church to exclude him from the fellowship. After sundry inquries made by the Brethren
Voted that we are at the end of labor with Br. Nathan Eagleston

1826

In 1826 Abraham Eggleston began to have difficulties with the church.

Feb 1826
Br. Abraham Eggleston came forward and manifested that his mind had been laboring under difficulties for a long time and thought that he could not walk with the church any longer and thought it the duty of the Church to exclude him from the Church It was suggested by some of the Brethren that we appoint a committee to visit Br. Eagleston a try to help his mind.
Voted that Brethren Amasa Sessions John B. Hoxey and Lemuel Smith be a committee to visit Br. Eagleston and report his case at our next monthly Church meeting.
The committee appointed to visit Br. Abraham Eagleston not all being present . Br. Sesions however made a favorable statement on the subject and requested another committee to visit Br. Eagleston and report his case at our next Ch mtg.

By August 1826, the church had come to the end of laboring with Abraham and fellowship was withdrawn from him.

24 (12) Aug 1826
After considerable time spent in conversation on Br. Eggleston’s case it was Voted that we are at the end of labor with Br. Abraham Eggleston. Voted to withdraw the hand of fellowship from Abraham Eggleston

1828

Benjamin Eggleston, son of Samuel and Rebecca Eggleston, along with his wife Elizabeth were baptized in May 1828. Unlike his brothers Samuel and Nathan, Benjamin was a faithful member and later served as a Deacon.

May 21, 1828
Came for the following persons:
Benjamin Eggleston
Elizabeth Eggleston

1832

By 1832, Benjamin Eggleston was a Deacon. There were many mentions of him through these later Church books, though we did not copy all of them.

1837

In 1837, Benjamin Eggleston was chosen Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the First Baptist Religious Society of Marcellus.

May 1837
At a meeting of the board of trustees of the first Baptist religious society of Marcellus held at the house of I. Mills Benjamin Eggleston was chosen chairman Charl. A. Calkins secretary & treasurer, Aaron Allen collector & S. C. Baker Sexton
Voted that 8 cords of wood be bought at 7/per cord of Charl A. Calkins & a collection taken on the 4th Sunday in May to pay Eld. B. W. Capron $3.00 for his service the past year in cleaning the house & building fires. E. Sesions B. Eggleston & A. Kneeland be requested to keep order below & J. Smith R. Hoxie & C. Calkins in the gallery. Eld B. W. Capron be requested to keep the key build fires, & sweep the house.

1841

In 1841 Benjamin Eggleston was chosen Trustee, along with his son-in-law Stepehn Vandenburgh. Stephen was also chosen as Clerk.

Theodore Eggleston, son of Benjamin, was Trustee years later, probably 1861 or 1867.

This concludes the transcriptions of pages that my father and I photocopied in 2001. We only copied pages that we noticed information about Eggleston family members, though we made some notes from other pages that were not copied. There likely were other mentions that we missed.

By the time of these later records, Benjamin and his family were the only Egglestons remaining in Marcellus and being associated with this church.

Note:

In my book, The Joseph Eggleston Family: Seven Generations from Joseph (d.1767) of Stonington, Connecticut to Joseph (1885-1965) of Utah and Wyoming (Including Maternal Lines: Hill, Burgess, Titus, Sammis & Johnson)  church record entries for specific people are discussed there under the heading CHURCH RECORDS. Background information about this church is included in Appendix B THE BAPTIST CHURCHES.

Eggleston Family Members in Marcellus Baptist Church Records Part 3 1816-1819

The old church records that my father and I found at the Rose Hill/Thorn Hill Baptist Church on our visit in 2001, proved to be a wealth of information about our Eggleston family. The Articles of Faith and Covenant, along with church membership lists are in a previous post. The first excerpts of entries pertaining to Eggleston family members from the beginnings of the church in 1807 until 1811 are in Part 1. Part 2 covers the years 1812- 1816. This Post, Part 3 continues from 1816 to 1819.

1816 Continued

Electa Eggleston, daughter of Samuel Jr., was baptized into the church in 1816. Some early databases placed Electa as the youngest in the family with an estimated birth date of 1812, which would have made her very young at this time. The Baptists did not baptize small children. The birth date for Electa in family letters is May 20, 1799, which would place her baptism the day before her 17th birthday.


May 19 1816
Joseph Enos and Electa Eggleston were Baptized and received into the church

Samuel Eggleston Jr. began to have issues with the church in 1816. This may have been a precipitating factor for his move from the area in 1817. The first mention was in September of 1816, when Brothers Amasa Chapman and Salman Hunt were sent to visit him. It is interesting that at the same meeting, Samuel’s brother Nathan was sent to visit Wyllis Manley.

Samuel’s case was brought up again at the September 21st meeting, however Brothers Chapman and Hunt had not visited him. They were encouraged to do so. Nathan Eggleston and Brother Chandler had also neglected to visit Brother Manley.

Sept 3rd 1816
Voted the Br. Amasa Chapman & Salman Hunt visit Br. Samuel Eagleston and report to the Church meeting.
Voted that Br. G. Chandler & N. Eagleston visit Br. Wyllis Manley & report next church meeting.
Sept 21 1816
Church met for business at Br. A. Hunt, according to previous appointment. Prayer by Eld Morton. Voted Eld Morton Moderator. The case of Br. Samuel Eggleston was then called up and it appeared that Br. Chapman & S. Hunt had neglected to visit Br. Eggleston consequently Voted they should still visit him. Br. Chandler states that he and Br. N. Eggleston have not visited Brother Wyllis Manley. But as he spoke his mind at last covenant meeting it was thought best for the brethren to visit him individually.

1817

In 1817, other members of the Eggleston family joined this church. Laura Eggleston joined along with Samuel Hovey, Polly Hovey and Jedediah Brown. The record indicates that they joined “by letter”, meaning that they had come from another church with a letter recommending them.

This Laura Eggleston was a mystery to me at the time I first saw these records. I had no idea how she fit into the family. It was some time later that I learned, through other Eggleston descendants, that the other Nathan Eggleston’s wife was Laura. This Nathan is probably the Nathaniel, mentioned as brother of Oliver in the church records. Nathan and Laura were the parents of Leonard Eggleston, who was on Marcellus Baptist Church membership lists.

Oliver Eggleston also joined the church that year. The record specifies that he had a letter from the church in Salem dated 4th March 1809. Salem is in Washington County, New York, where most of the Eggleston lived prior to coming to Marcellus. It is interesting that Oliver had this letter for several years before coming to Marcellus.

Oliver was most likely a son of Joseph Eggleston, who had migrated to Marcellus with Samuel.

1817 21
Covenant Meeting the Church appearing to be in great union. The following persons were united to the church viz. Samuel Hovey, Polly Hovey, Laura Eggleston Jedediah Brown (by letter) and Alpheus Winchester was restored to the fellowship of the Church
1817 Oliver Eggleston was received into our Fellowship by letter from the church in Salem dated 4th March 1809

The case of Samuel Eggleston was brought up again, after his being labored with. He apparently was reluctant to continue with the church, but the church postponed his matter until the next meeting.

Br. Samuel Eggleston being present was labored with faithfully but could not be prevailed upon to take up his travail with the Church. Voted to postpone his matter until next church meeting.

At the next meeting March 11, Samuel seemed to have a change of heart, so his matter was suspended.

1817 March 11
Met for business at Br. Salmon Hunt. Prayer by Br. A. Kneeland. Voted Br. A. Kneeland Moderator. Deacon Thompson reported that he had visited Br. Samuel Eggleston he say Br. Manifested a desire to travail with the church and he hoped that he should be able to make satisfaction to the brethren. Voted to suspend the matter with Br. Eggleston for the present.

April 4, 1817, Elizabeth Eggleston was given a letter of recommendation. This was close to the time that Samuel and Elizabeth sold their land in Marcellus and moved to Springwater, New York. Elizabeth apparently was a member in good standing and given the letter to join another church.

Oliver Eggleston had problems with the church in April 1817. It is interesting that Laura Eggleston, who joined at the same time he did, supported the charges against him. His brothers Nathaniel and Edward and Edward’s wife also refused to defend him. Oliver’s time in the church was short and what happened to him after that is not known.

A complaint was brought against Br. Oliver Eggleston for using profane language at Different times previous to his joining the church (he joined this church by a letter which he had for some years signed by Elder Warren) This charge was supported in evidence by Br. Wm Hunt & Sister Phebe Hunt & Laura Eggleston. Also by his Brother Nathaniel. His Brother Edward and his wife refuse to clear him. Br. Oliver has been labored with at different times and invariably denies the charge or says he has no recollection of ever swearing or taking the name of God in vain…
Voted to Withdraw fellowship from Oliver Eggleston.

September 7, 1817 the church voted to withdraw fellowship from Samuel Eggleston. Samuel had sold his land in April 1817, so he may have already moved away. Possibly, he did not request a letter of recommendation at the time Elizabeth did, or he moved before the church had voted on his status. It is also possibly that they had not yet moved, or he had come back briefly.

Voted to withdraw fellowship from Samuel Eggleston
Samuel Eggleston is excluded

1818

Years after his difficulties with the church, Truman Skeels was finally excluded in 1818.

The whole transaction appears to be the fruit of a dishonest principle. Viz. to say it is right to run in debt and give a man worthless security without telling his creditor of the fallacy.
After laboring with him some time nothing could be gained accept he said he had done wrong by assuming debt after that he had determination taking the benefit of the act.
Voted unanimously that we are at the end of labor with him.
Truman Skeels is Excluded
Voted the clerk shall write Truman Skeels a letter of Exclusion

In April 1818 Elizabeth Eggleston was Dismissed. Since Samuel and Elizabeth had already moved away and Elizabeth had been given a letter or recommendation, there is some question about whether this is a different Elizabeth. I didn’t see any mention in the records of an issue with an Elizabeth Eggleston prior to this and the term dismissed would not seem to indicate that she was excluded because of problems, but just that she had moved or left in good standing.

1818 April 26
Elizabeth Eggleston Dismissed

Abraham Eggleston, apparently the son of Joseph Eggleston, was baptized in December 1818. It is interesting that the record mentions that the others baptized with him related their experiences, however it does not say that Abraham did.

1818 Dec 26 Covenant Meeting
A much larger number of the church were present than common there also appeared to be more union in church than has been for some time past. Tryphene Allen related her experience and was fellowship as a Christian. . .Fanny Sessions related her experience of mind and received fellowship from the church. . .
27
Elder Alphred Bennet Preached and administered the Lords Supper
Abraham Eggleston Tryphene Allen & Fanny Sessions were baptised and united to the church.

1819

In July 1819, the church received word that Samuel Eggleston had joined another Baptist Church. The record did not mention which church, as it did with the mention of Daniel Moore and Susanna Tanner joining the church in Harmony. Susanna Tanner was the wife of Amos Tanner, son of Thomas Tanner and Phoebe Eggleston. Phoebe was a daughter of Samuel and Rebecca Eggleston. Many of the Tanner children had moved to Harmony in Chautauqua County, New York along with Nathan Eggleston and some of Benjamin Eggleston‘s children.

July 1825
New information that Br. Samuel Eagleston has united with another Church of our faith and order. Also that Brother Daniel Moore and Susanna Tanner have united with the Baptist Church in Harmony

Note:

The Marcellus Baptist Church Records continue in another blog post: Part 4 1825 and later.

In my book, The Joseph Eggleston Family: Seven Generations from Joseph (d.1767) of Stonington, Connecticut to Joseph (1885-1965) of Utah and Wyoming (Including Maternal Lines: Hill, Burgess, Titus, Sammis & Johnson)  church record entries for specific people are discussed there under the heading CHURCH RECORDS. Background information about this church is included in Appendix B THE BAPTIST CHURCHES.

Eggleston Family Members in Marcellus Baptist Church Records Part 2 1812-1816

The old church records that my father and I found at the Rose Hill/Thorn Hill Baptist Church on our visit in 2001, proved to be a wealth of information about our Eggleston family. The Articles of Faith and Covenant, along with church membership lists are in a previous post. The first excerpts of entries pertaining to Eggleston family members from the beginnings of the church in 1807 until 1811 are in Part 1. This post, Part 2 covers the years 1812- 1816.

1812

Isaac Skeels, who later married Samuel Eggleston Jr.’s daughter Anna, joined the Marcellus Church June 7, 1812, along with his brother Truman Skeels.

Jun 7
John Alport, Truman Skeels & Isaac Skeels was this day Baptized and received into our fellowship

1813

The Skeels began to have difficulties with the Church shortly after joining. Nathan Eggleston and Luther Manley were sent to visit Simeon Skeels, Isaac’s father, and request he attend a meeting. Deacon Thompson had received a letter from another church mentioning a difficulty with Simeon Skeels and the wife of Jedidiah Hurd. Unfortunately, I did not copy the next page, so this issue is left hanging.

May 15 1813
At Covenant meeting upon a request from Brethren in Camillus.
Voted to send Eld. Harman, Joshua Chandler, Amasa Kneeland & Truman Skeels to set in council on the 20th inst.
Voted at church meeting on Saturday next at 1 o’clock at Deacon Thompsons.
Voted Deacon Thompson, Amasa Sessions, Amasa Chapman, Nathan Eagleston & Luther Manley a committee to visit Mr. Simeon Skeels and request him to attend said meeting.
May 22 Brethren of the church met for Church meeting at Deacon Thompsons according to a previous appointment. After prayer Deacon Nathan Thompson moderator.
Then received a letter from the Church in Gorham stating a difficulty against Brother Simeon Skeels for harboring the wife of Jedediah Hurd. After hearing the above letter and also from the above committee who have visited Brother Skeels. Proceeded to enquire into the merits of the case. 1st Did the wife of Jedediah Hurd have liberty from him to come to Marcellus. Ans. it appeared she had $9 an order from J. D. Hurd and other circumstances. 2nd Has Brother Skeels refused to . . .

Later in the summer of 1813, probably August, Betsey Eggleston was baptized along with Sally Berry. There were a number of Betsey Egglestons. One, Samuel Jr.’s wife had been baptized in the early days of the church, her name being given as Elizabeth in that record. John B. Eggleston married Betsey Hoxie about 1810, so this could be her. Benjamin Eggleston married Elizabeth Wiltse and they were active members later.

15
Received Sisters Sally Berry & Betsey Eggleston into our Fellowship by baptism

1814

Simeon Skeels difficulties had not just been with his previous church. Another issue was brought before the church in 1814. This was about dificulties he had with individual of the church and refusing or neglecting to attend to the difficulties. Nathan Eggleston was again one sent to work with him.

I am including this letter of exclusion for Betsy Johnson because it is probably typical of those letter than some of our family members received.

March 11 1814
Church met agreeable to appointment at Deacon Thompsons after prayer & singing. Voted Deacon Hiscock moderator. Brethren Nathan Eagleston and Wyllis Manly inform the Church that they have cited Br. Simeon Skeels to attend here today. Br. Skeels being present says he has neglected his duty as stated above—and Further says he will attend to the difficulty with those individuals in two weeks. Voted to postpone the above matter with Br. Skeels until next Church Meeting.
Betsy Johnson letter of exclusion “To our once covenanted Sister Betsy Johnson you are hereby informed that in consequence of your unchristian conduct your neglect of travail with the chutch and your refusing to head the church when called upon, we have put you away from amongst us. Yet our desire and prayer to God is that you may find repentance twards God and faith in our Lord Jesus Christ and yet be. . ..

This matter between Simeon Skeel and Brother and Sister Hurd was apparently resolved in April.

April 2 1814
Church met agreeable to appointment. After singing and prayer Br. Skeels being present says he has attended to the difficulty which he has had with individuals of the Church which was proved by Brethren Nathan Eagleston and Amasa Sessions. Voted Satisfied with Br. Simeon Skeels on their labour with him. Br. Simeon Skeels then brought difficulties as follows against Br. Thadeous L. Hurd Viz. 1st Br. Thadeus L. Hurd has once settled all matters of difficulty with him and afterwords denied it or said he had a difficulty with him 2nd For not attending to the above difficulty in a Gospel manner…3rd He says Br. Hurd has reported that he (Br. Skeels) has said one thing at one time and denied it at another time. Voted to receive the above difficulties to labour after learning that Br. Skeels has taken Br. N. Eaglestone and Br. Sessions to labor with him. After considerable conversation Br. Skeels and Br. Hurd & wife said to be satisfied with each other. Voted we are satisfied with them.

Later in 1814, Simeon and Isaac Skeels apparently were becoming involved with Universalism. Nathan Eggleston was sent with Deacon Thompson to visit them.

Sept 26 1814
Brethren appointed to visit Brethren Simeon and Isaac Skeels made reutrns. Voted we are not satisfied with those brethrem. Voted Deacon Thompson & Bro. Nathan Eggleston shall be appointed to visit Brethren Simeon and Isaac Skeels to learn their sentiment concerning Universalism and cite them to our next church meeting.
Nov 12 1814
Church met at Brother John Hunt to set in order things wanting in Gods house. . .After singing and prayer Bro. Harmon was chosen moderator. Deacon Thompson made returns that he with Bro. N. Eagleston had visited Br. Simeon Skeels (Br. Isaac being in the army) and cited him to attend here to day he was not present. Deacon Thompson also stated that in conversation with Br. Simeon Skeels upon the subject of Universalism he stated that he hoped there was no future punishment but did not answer definitely that he believed all men would go to heaven at death or not. Voted that we still are dissatisfied with Br. Skeels. Voted Brethren John Hunt & Ebenezer Lewis shall cite Br. Simeon Skeels to attend next church meeting and answer the Church 1st then reason of his hope why there will be no future punishment and why he has not maintained a gospel travail with the church.

1815

In 1815, apparently after church leaders and members working with the Skeels, Isaac excluded from the church.

Oct 19 1815
Br. Isaac Skeels being present says his mind is much the same it was at the last church meeting after much conversation and labor with him.Eld. Harman then arose and give him the second admonition. We then voted to withdraw our Fellowship from Br. Isaac Skeels. Voted that the Clerk write and read a letter of exclusion next sabbath.

1816

Though Isaac Skeels had been excluded, the church was still working with Truman Skeels in 1816. Nathan Eggleston was sent with John Hunt to visit him.

Feb 29th 1816
Voted Br. John Hunt & Bro. Nathan Eagleston to visit Brother T. Skeels, W. Manley, L. Manley & Calvin Manley and request them to help eld. Harman and make [ ]. . .

Bro. J. Hunt & Br. N. Eggleston say that they have visited the Brethren to which they were appointed and they informed them that they would visit Eld. Harman and settle with him.

Note:

The Marcellus Baptist Church Records continue in another blog post: Part 3 1816-1819.

In my book, The Joseph Eggleston Family: Seven Generations from Joseph (d.1767) of Stonington, Connecticut to Joseph (1885-1965) of Utah and Wyoming (Including Maternal Lines: Hill, Burgess, Titus, Sammis & Johnson)  church record entries for specific people are discussed there under the heading CHURCH RECORDS. Background information about this church is included in Appendix B THE BAPTIST CHURCHES.

Eggleston Family Members in Marcellus Baptist Church Records Part 1 1807-1811

The Records of the First Baptist Church of Marcellus

The old church records that my father and I found at the Rose Hill/Thorn Hill Baptist Church on our visit in 2001, proved to be a wealth of information about our Eggleston family. The Articles of Faith and Covenant, along with church membership lists are in a previous post.

This post begins a discussion of specific entries in the record that pertain to members of our extended family. Because there are so many, I have divided them into four blog posts, in chronological order. This Part 1 covers entries from the beginning of the church in 1807 until 1811.

1807

The Church Record book began in 1807 and Eggleston family members were some of the first to be baptized into this church. Thomas Tanner was the husband of Phebe Eggleston, daughter of Samuel and Rebecca. After Phebe’s death, he married her sister Karen. Joshua Covey was the husband of Rebecca’s sister Karen/Coran Eggleston. Charles Richards was married to Betsey, probably daughter of Joseph Eggleston, Rebecca’s brother. They were all baptized the same day, March 7 (possibly 27th) 1807.

On the same page and also baptized in March 1807 was John Eggleston. John and his wife Rachel lived near the other Egglestons in Marcellus. He is somewhat of a mystery, but likely was another son of Samuel and Rebecca.

Samuel Eggleston Jr. was baptized April 19, 1807, along with his brother Nathan. Samuel’s wife Elizabeth was baptized on May 24th.


March (7th?) 1807 Thomas Tanner & Joshua Covey & Charles Richards & Cyril Johnson Was baptized and joined this church.

March (?th) 1807
David Robbins, Joseph Humphrey, John Egleston, Sally Winchester was Baptised & joined this church

April 19th 1807
Samuel Eagleton Jr. and Nathan Eagleston Was baptised and joined this church.
Sunday May 24th 1807
Elizabeth Eagleston & Hannah Humphrey & Betsy Johnson was Baptised and joined this Church.

1808

In 1808, some family members began to have issues with the church. Joshua Covey was the first. In September 1807 brethren were sent to visit Brother Covey. Apparently after months of work with him, he was restored to fellowship April 22, 1808.

Saturday April 22, 1808
Joshua Covey was restored to fellowship

1809

1809 brought difficulties for Thomas Tanner. This appears to be the beginning of a time of reform because several church members were identified as having difficulties needing to be addressed.

Saturday Jan 7th 1809
At our church meeting Made choice of Deacon Jesse Manley Moderator. Voted that Deacon Thompson, Joseph Humphrey, Jesse Manley, Joshua B. Bearss, Elder Harman, Deacon Kneeland & Amasa Kneeland to visit the following brethren to wit, Thomas Tanner, Daniel Mingus, Wm Collins and go with Brother Eldridge to look into matter between him & Adams.
Saturday Feb 4th 1809
At our stated Church meeting made choice of Deacon Thompson moderator. On hearing the returns from Brother Tanner Voted to suspend labour until our next Church meeting in course. Returns were then made from brother Mingus. The church voted to have an extra church meeting to labour with brother Mingus. The church voted satisfied with brother Collins. Brother Eldredge being present spoke for himself. A majority of the brethren voted satisfied.

In spite of efforts by the brethren and being given an opportunity to “confess his wrongs,” Thomas did not comply and the church voted to exclude him from membership. This was announced through a letter read in public the next Sunday at the school house.

There are no details in the record to indicate what “wrongs” Thomas needed to confess. It is interesting that his problems were originally called to the attention of the church along with several other men, which may indicate that it was a time the church felt a need to reform members. Thomas did not return to the church.

March 11th 1809
At our Stated Church meeting Deacon Jesse Manley was chosen moderator. Brother Tho Tanner being present was called upon by the Church to confess his wrongs; but not complying the church voted to exclude him. A letter of exclusion to be read in public on Sunday 19th inst, at framed School house. Brother King being present was called upon to confess to the satisfaction of the church.

Later in 1809, Brother J. Eggleston, probably John, was cited. At the same November meeting, Charles Richards was excluded.

Nov 1809
Voted Br. Hunt cite Br. Winchester. Elder Harmon to cite Br. Bears and Sister Wentworth Br. Chandler & Br. Thompson to cite Brother Mills J. Eaglestone & Johnson. Br. John Kneeland to cite Wm. Collins and wife. Voted Br. A. Kneeland write a letter of exclusion for Taylor and read tomorrow. Also voted a letter of exclusion for Charles Richards.

John Eggleston’s difficulties were mentioned further in November 1809. Apparently the church member’s efforts with him were successful. On the 6th (probably December) he confessed to their satisfaction.

Thursday Nov 10th 1809
The Church met agreeable to appointment (Extra Meeting) After singing and prayer made choice of Elder Harmon moderator. Brethren J. Hunt, Eld. Harmon J. Chandler Dea Thompson and Dea. Kneeland made returns that they had cited the following brethren to attend this meeting agreeable to their appointment to wit. Br. E. Winchester Br. Bears Sister Wentworth, Bro Mills Br. J. Eggleston Br. Johnson Br. Collins and Sister Collins.
6th
Took up labor with Br. John Eggleston for his neglect of duty in not fulfilling his covenant obligations with his brethren. On his confessing his faults Voted satisfied with him.

1811

Thomas Marsh, who later married Samuel Eggleston Jr.’s daughter Lucy, apparently moved back and forth across Skaneateles Lake, or at least transferred membership from the Marcellus Church to the Sempronius Baptist Church. He was given a letter to take to the Sempronius Church.

May 1811
“The Baptist church of Christ in Sempronius to whom it may concern This certify that Brother Thomas Marsh is a member of good standing in this Church with us and as such we recommend him to any Church of our faith and order and when joined as such dismised from us. By order and in behalf of the Church. Ezekiel Sayles Ch Cl Sempronius May 11th 1811
A true copy attest A. Sessions

Note:

The Marcellus Baptist Church Records continue in another blog post: Part 2 1812-1816.

In my book, The Joseph Eggleston Family: Seven Generations from Joseph (d.1767) of Stonington, Connecticut to Joseph (1885-1965) of Utah and Wyoming (Including Maternal Lines: Hill, Burgess, Titus, Sammis & Johnson)  church record entries for specific people are discussed there under the heading CHURCH RECORDS. Background information about this church is included in Appendix B THE BAPTIST CHURCHES.

Eliza Eggleston Barron

I would really like to have known Aunt Eliza Eggleston Barron. The glimpses we have of her, especially from her letters, give me the impression she was quite spunky and would have been an entertaining storyteller. Her life was not necessarily easy and was not very long.

Eliza’s Early Life

Eliza Eggleston Barron was born March 25, 1810 in Marcellus, Onondaga, New York. Family records had estimated her birth as 1802, but there appeared to be confusion with her sister Electa. Eliza was the youngest daughter in the family. In genealogical information sent by Orson to his father in 1876, he gave this birth date for Eliza. Eliza died November 4, 1869.

Eliza married Carr D. Barron May 9, 1840 in Owasco, Cayuga, New York. He was born February 15, 1809 in Owasco, Cayuga, New York. Eliza and Carr Barron moved from Springwater, Livingston, New York to Michigan, apparently before her sister Electa and family came.

Glimpses of Eliza’s Life through Letters

Much of the sense I get of Eliza’s personality, I gain from a letter she wrote to her brother Samuel June 8, 1862 from Groveland, Michigan. She wrote:

Groveland, June 8, 1862

“It is a long time since I have written to you. You must excuse my neglect for it is quite a task for me to write a letter. My health is not very good but I work some and attend to my business. Carr’s health is poor but he works as hard as ever. Two years ago last fall he had a fit of the palsy, the second one. It was a long time before he could work much. It hurt his speech and memory but we are mortals subject to decay. I suppose you will want to know about the children. Almon will be 21 in August next. Mary was 19 in April and Sarah 17 in May. Barton is 10. They are healthy children and a great help to us.”

Letter from Eliza Eggleston Barron to Samuel Eggleston

After this general family news and health report, she told her brother Samuel about other family members. This is what she had to say about their younger brother Ansel:

“Five years ago this summer Ansel come her head up and pockets full of gold. He said he was on his way to Pennsylvania to get some money that was a comeing to him. He staid here a week and then left and in January after he came here again poorer than Job turkeys. He said he had come from Des Moines and he had left Mary there. She had a boy and he dident know whether it was his or not. He had started for California. He staid here four weeks and then wrote to Mary to come here in about two weeks she came and such a bundle of rags you never saw. She had on an old black calico dress narrow and nasty. It was all she had. Ne bed nor bedding. We found them house, stove, chairs, bed bedding, dishes, and a cow. Through that summer and the next winter he tot into a shop to shoemake and made a living. After that he took a notion to go on his own hooks and wanted Carr to sign with him but he refused and he has been mad at me ever since. I think he is kind of ticklish property. He is now at Holley a shoemaking. They now get a good living.”

Later in the later she mentions, as if she forgot and then just remembered, “”Ansel has 3 boys.” Eliza also shared with Samuel some information about a contact with another Eggleston regarding genealogy. She seemed to want direction from Samuel about how to respond to this person.

“I had a letter the other day from Rev. A. Eggleston, Broome Co., N.Y. He wants me to give him the births, marriages and deaths of my father, mother, brothers and sisters, all except you and their children and grandchildren, if they have any, and all their names and ages, who they married and their occupation. I think he must be crazy. He give his address Broome Co., N.Y. but not the Post Office where it was mailed was rubbed off. . . Write as soon as you get this and tell me if you know what postoffice to direct my letter to him. Your affectionate sister

Eliza Barron

Write soon and direct your letter to Goodrichville, Genesee Co., Mich.”

If this Rev. A. Eggleston was crazy, as Eliza says, then I must be too. I understand the mindset of a genealogist trying to gather family information. In fact Eliza’s nephew Orson asked for the same kind of information when he visited her family while on his mission.

Eliza’s Passing

In a letter to Samuel dated March 5, 1873, their brother Ambrose wrote that he did not know where Eliza was. “I have had no correspondence with her since I moved into Allegany.” Apparently they had not kept in touch, and he was not aware of her death. At the time Orson was on his mission in Michigan in 1876, Eliza was dead. He did spend some time there with his Uncle Carr and cousins.

Eliza Eggleston Barron died of cancer November 4, 1869 in Groveland, Oakland, Michigan. Unfortunately her death record does not give her parents names and has her birthplace as New Jersey, not New York.

Death Record of Eliza Eggleston Barron
Death Record for Eliza Barron, the last entry showing on this image.

Eliza was buried in the Ortonville Cemetery in Oakland County, Michigan. There is a large Barron marker there.

After Eliza’s death, Carr married Sarah M. Beach Thurston March 2, 1870. She was born July 6, 1812 in Gates, Monroe, New York. They had no children.